Historic Cues. Do you have any?

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
Dick and Ken, thanks very much for posting those great cues.

Dick, your website has been my go-to for years, appreciate it very much. I also remember you at tournaments, and buying a Scruggs Titlist conversion from you in 2002 in Lanham, Md.

Ken, the Mizerak Dove Balabushka has to be one of the most iconic cues of all time. Other than the Joss I posted, and three other cues, it's also the only one in this thread that I've seen up close in person. So this one's extra special. I was hoping you'd post it at some point. Many thanks to both of you.

All the best,
WW
 
Last edited:

Moet.1977

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
wow

Wow those are some amazing cues their great history.
Thanks for posting these cues guys I love getting to see
Cues like this. You guys are very lucky to own them, I think
any collector would absolutely love to have any of them.
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
In 1973 I had my Palmer stolen and I called George and met him in his shop. At the time I was fooling around restoring, inlaying and refinishing cues so we talked for quite a while and he showed me how he put on his finish and gave me a jar of his finish to try. I also ordered a plain 4 point cue. I sent him some MOP inlays I made which I'm sure he never used and he sent me a cue for $120. which I definitely did use. A year later my car was stolen with the cue inside, I got the car back minus tires, battery, radio, cue and a briefcase full of papers. I called George and three weeks later I had another cue for $125. Neither cue was inlaid.

Great account, Paul. If it was 1973, you may have had the same Palmer I did, typical plexiglass window buttplate. Sorry to hear of the loss, but it's also good to hear that you got another Bushka to replace your lost one in only three weeks. That's pretty good surge capacity.

I'm more intrigued by the jar of finish he gave you, as I've heard accounts that he used mainly spray cans, and didn't use all the can, as the first half was usually the best. This tells me that by his later production, he had probably gone to a brushable lacquer. Anyhow, it's always good to hear from those who had actual contact with George.

All the best,
WW
 

classiccues

Don't hashtag your broke friends
Silver Member
I do not know if I answered this but, what we have found is George's Cues follow a basic timeline BUT there is crossing of the designs vs the time. We know in his last year or two, when he was primarily using Gus blanks, he made a few Spains, possibly titlists. So a window on a Spain is not all that shocking.

This Bushka came off the internet and could be a windowed Gus blank, I don't know, without seeing the cue in person. So nothing surprises me.

JV

This gem belongs to my friend Brian, bigb'scues - cue is going out for a special resto and better photos will be taken then.

Potentially historic cue? Balabushka, Spain forearm, gorgeous intact window and foil, sharp classic Bushka ring, MOP inlays... All on one cue.

I haven't seen many window cues. I haven't seen many non-Titlist window cues. I haven't seen any window cues with a Bushka ring, are there any others?

JV, any thoughts?


EDIT: It's not foil, but milled aluminum
 

Attachments

  • bushka_2_cl.jpg
    bushka_2_cl.jpg
    89.6 KB · Views: 1,131

classiccues

Don't hashtag your broke friends
Silver Member
There are so many rumors about the late 80's and early 90's... Those who know aren't saying, and those with anonymous accounts shouldn't be saying unless you are going to mention names, including yours.

Now that aside.. George was a master at efficiency. His basic cues, titlists, forearms, etc.. were basically 30-40% done. Remember most were simple, cutting and sleeving plastic rings is not complicated. Even using pre-turned shafts... I think from 58-59 to 75, 1200 is not out of the question.

Remember he didn't have to dazzle the internet know it all's with 20 year hang times taking a .000005" off each cut, at 3850.58595 RPM.

He made cues for world champions. That was his business.
JV

[/COLOR]


Does anyone know if this is in anyway true??
 

Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There are so many rumors about the late 80's and early 90's... Those who know aren't saying, and those with anonymous accounts shouldn't be saying unless you are going to mention names, including yours.

Now that aside.. George was a master at efficiency. His basic cues, titlists, forearms, etc.. were basically 30-40% done. Remember most were simple, cutting and sleeving plastic rings is not complicated. Even using pre-turned shafts... I think from 58-59 to 75, 1200 is not out of the question.

Remember he didn't have to dazzle the internet know it all's with 20 year hang times taking a .000005" off each cut, at 3850.58595 RPM.

He made cues for world champions. That was his business.
JV

Today we seem to tend to diminish cue "assemblers" in favor of scratch makers. But Balabushka was a cue assembler, not a scratch maker.

Give the right parts to the right assembler and you can have a top notch player.

The best example to prove that is Balabushka himself.

And it detracts nothing from his work.

.
 

Colonel

Living The Dream
Silver Member
Today we seem to tend to diminish cue "assemblers" in favor of scratch makers. But Balabushka was a cue assembler, not a scratch maker.



Give the right parts to the right assembler and you can have a top notch player.



The best example to prove that is Balabushka himself.



And it detracts nothing from his work.



.



Ok Doc, do you think there's anyone fitting into that category today?
 

Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok Doc, do you think there's anyone fitting into that category today?

Interesting question. And what surprises me is that I had not considered it at all.

I am not sure what category you mean.

We certainly have some great cue makers today.

Cues and cue making have evolved a lot.

Do we have a "modern Balabushka?" Seems to be the question as best as I can figure out.


My knee jerk answer when I saw your question was no. But after reflecting on the matter I have to say I simply can't answer. I don't know. Maybe I don't know enough to answer or am not sufficiently qualified or experienced.

Still, my heart wants to say no.


.
 

dnixon

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
1975 Bob Meucci. This was given to Palmer Byrd in 1975 by Bob Meucci. P.S. to chopdoc: cross this off your list. Has nylon insert. Lol
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0124-2.JPG
    IMG_0124-2.JPG
    41.2 KB · Views: 1,062
  • IMG_0132.JPG
    IMG_0132.JPG
    37.1 KB · Views: 1,036

dnixon

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
More pics.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0133.JPG
    IMG_0133.JPG
    40 KB · Views: 822
  • IMG_0130.JPG
    IMG_0130.JPG
    35.8 KB · Views: 943
  • IMG_0129.JPG
    IMG_0129.JPG
    35 KB · Views: 939

cuesblues

cue accumulator
Silver Member
I don't know if they are historic, but these cues were owned by this guy.
He was a famous stage actor.
I read that he used to play billiards at the Lambs Club in New York, with John Barrymore and other actors.



Otis_Skinner.jpg

tour-of-otis-skinner.png

Poster-OtisSkinner-1899.jpg

DSC00018 (2).jpg

DSC00010 (2).jpg
 

Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't know if they are historic, but these cues were owned by this guy.
He was a famous stage actor.
I read that he used to play billiards at the Lambs Club in New York, with John Barrymore and other actors.


I would say they are historic. The provenance is known and connected to a figure with some historical references.


I dig that stuff. :thumbup:




.
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
1975 Bob Meucci. This was given to Palmer Byrd in 1975 by Bob Meucci. P.S. to chopdoc: cross this off your list. Has nylon insert. Lol

What a nice old Meucci cue. In the points, it looks like a combination of a gunsight design, plus almost an earlier version of his "road agent" cue to hit years later.

The name Palmer Byrd may not be familiar to some, but she along with women such as Dorothy Wise paved the way for womens' billiards in later generations. Great cue and post; thanks very much.

All the best,
WW
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
I don't know if they are historic, but these cues were owned by this guy.
He was a famous stage actor.
I read that he used to play billiards at the Lambs Club in New York, with John Barrymore and other actors.

What a nice collection of Rambow cues. And correct me if I'm wrong, but they appear to be Rambows, rather than generic Brunswick cues, given their treatment and look.

Historic indeed, whenever an actor has players such as these. Great post, thank you very much.

All the best,
WW
 
Top