Is It Safe to Have Amateurs Dismantle a Gold Crown?

Mike the Beginner

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Very interested in advice on this. Local mechanic wants $900 to move a GCIII 2.5 miles up the road. Current owner and me, the buyer, are thinking of taking it apart and moving it ourselves so I can just pay the mechanic the $375 he charges for setup. Is there anything we should know when taking it apart? Is this a dumb idea? I've paid a huge amount (well, for me) to build a room for the table and I don't want to ruin the table myself getting it moved!

Thanks much for any help...
 

ThinSlice

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Very interested in advice on this. Local mechanic wants $900 to move a GCIII 2.5 miles up the road. Current owner and me, the buyer, are thinking of taking it apart and moving it ourselves so I can just pay the mechanic the $375 he charges for setup. Is there anything we should know when taking it apart? Is this a dumb idea? I've paid a huge amount (well, for me) to build a room for the table and I don't want to ruin the table myself getting it moved!

Thanks much for any help...

It’s not a problem to take it a part and move. A couple pieces are heavy. Mainly the 3 piece slate. But, 2 relatively strong men can do it without any issue. Just mark or sort into bags the different bolt and screws. You can even assemble it with enough patience. Now to recover the table or do any rail modifications while it’s apart is an entirely different animal and not only requires a mechanic but, a good mechanic. Outside of that the toughest part of you decide to assemble it will be leveling the 3 piece slate. That can be very difficult if you have never done it. You can learn by doing which is certainly possible although you will pull your hair out a couple times or you can have someone level and recover it. Up to you. You might save a little money having someone level and recover if you have the table assembled only to the base. Because they would normally have to do that. At bare minimal they certainly would appreciate it. Good luck.


So my vote is go for it. Not difficult and I could even walk you through it if needed. PM me if you need help or advise.

Sent from my iPhone using AzBilliards Forums
 

Type79

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
It depends on your expectations.

Some thoughts that come to mind:
- $375 is quite a bargain for a proper setup of a Gold Crown.
Have you talked to other mechanics, and if so, specifically about their experience with Gold Crown IIIs?
- Are you experienced with disassembling a Gold Crown III?
- Are you experienced assembling a Gold Crown III?
- Have you ever moved 300lb slates?
- After assembly and setup who do you expect to be responsible for any issues?
- If you are primarily basing your decision on price, the possibility of errors widens.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Sure it CAN be done but do you really want it done?? If they are REALLY careful and pack-n-pad every critical part sure its doable. I would NOT have them do ANY re-assembly work. Be sure to bag-n-tag ALL screws/bolts/fasteners.
 

lgherb

Registered
I bought my GCII about 15+ years ago from a guy in the Hudson Valley (NY) who was moving to Vegas the following week. He gave me quite the deal that was contingent on having the table removed from his basement within 4 days.

I live in Maryland, so my then teenage son and I drove up to New York with a copy of Mose Duane's pool table maintenance and repair book in hand.

As ThinSlice says, it is not overly difficult, but keep a systematic approach and - echoing ThinSlice's advice - keep all of your screws, bolts, and parts clearly organized and labeled.

I'd also take cell phone pictures of every major component BEFORE you disassemble them so you have a photo record of how it goes back together.

If you have to go up any steps with the slate, I recommend using a hand truck and strapping the slate section (only do 1 at a time) to the hand truck (or consider using an appliance dolly). One "oops" and you might be looking at shopping for new slate. Get some moving blankets to use also.

If you're using a pickup or van, put the slate sections in your vehicle 1st and make sure that weight is between your axles.

When I purchases my table, I set it up myself. Though I did a pretty good job, I'll hire a mechanic to do this moving forward. (I'm looking for a mechanic to set it up again now.) A mechanic has the experience to get it level and get the cloth right so that it will be playable for years to come.

Lastly, I'd confirm the setup price. That $375 set up fee might simply be a labor charge line item in the total relocation and setup quote and a setup charge in isolation could be higher.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My buddy and I bought two Gold Crown I's out of a local bowling alley. We disassebled and transported them ourselves, cosmetically restored them ourselves and hired a professional to do the railwork and setup. Anyone with minimal mechanical aptitude can break it down and transport it. If you do a search of the Mechanic's Section, Trent posted the service manual of all the Gold Crown Models. Read through the Gold Crown III version and take your time during disassembly.
 

Mike the Beginner

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks very much for the replies. I'm still torn as to how to proceed. But this gives me more information. I appreciate it.

Mike
P.S. I'm clearly going to need a new avatar.... :cool:
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks very much for the replies. I'm still torn as to how to proceed. But this gives me more information. I appreciate it.

Mike
P.S. I'm clearly going to need a new avatar.... :cool:
Just go for it. I think you'll be fine. It certainly isn't difficult.

49622667162_283e6b60a9_c.jpg
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Here is a reference to the Gold Crown III Service Manual

Take your time. The slates are about 215 lbs. Best if you can move them with a hand truck or dolly, though two able-bodied individuals can carry them. If using a cart/dolly/hand truck, slide the slates off the sides of the frame, and rest the side edge on the floor, to stand each slate upright. This saves unnecessary lifting. I like to stack components face-to-face, and wrap everything together with stretch wrap. I then wrap all components with mover's blankets, and stretch wrap again. Maybe a couple of quart and gallon storage bags, and a small box for hardware. I generally use a 27 gallon storage tote, which fits everything, including pockets, castings and ball return tray.

If it's not already marked, be sure to mark each slate location. The frame should be factory stamped.

Be careful that you don't bend the ball return rails. Absolutely remove them from the frame. In fact, my first step is to remove the pockets. Second is to remove the ball return.

Might as well continue the procedure:
- Remove hardware securing the ball return tray to the frame
- Remove rail bolts (middle bolt on foot rail requires a shallow socket and ratchet, accessed from the ball storage tray)
- Remove rail top assembly, flip it upside-down, and rest it back on the table (lift head end first to clear the slate, then slide the assembly toward the foot end of the table to clear the ball return tray, then lift the foot end above the table)
- Remove the corner brackets that secure the aprons together
- Remove the bolts that secure each apron the the rail top assembly, as well as the small bolts that secure the end aprons to the ball storage tray
- Remove the bots that secure the ball storage tray (you may or may not wish to separate the ball return tray from the ball storage tray)
- Remove the castings from the rails, by removing the bolts that secure each
- Remove the cloth (make sure that there are NO staples on the underside of each slate)
- Remove screws that secure slates to the frame. These are in-set from the screws that hold the slates to the liners (DO NOT REMOVE THESE)
- Remove slates (Gold Crown III slates should not have alignment dowels)
- Remove inner frame support members
- Remove end frame members (4 bolts total)
- Remove side frame members (4 bolts total, securing members to pedestals)
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Also of note:
An entire Gold Crown can be transported in a Dodge Grand Caravan (or similar), or any truck with a 5.5' box. I believe I recall a member here who transported one in a Honda Pilot. I will also note that a Gold Crown is around 1200 pounds... This is generally quite a bit more than the specified weight capacity of a number of vehicles. Just be careful of the slate placement (try to get it centered in the vehicle, and as far forward as possible), and of any erratic movements.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for the clear, detailed post!
Will benefit a lot of us.
Hope the mods make it a sticky.
smt
 

ThinSlice

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Here is a reference to the Gold Crown III Service Manual

Take your time. The slates are about 215 lbs. Best if you can move them with a hand truck or dolly, though two able-bodied individuals can carry them. If using a cart/dolly/hand truck, slide the slates off the sides of the frame, and rest the side edge on the floor, to stand each slate upright. This saves unnecessary lifting. I like to stack components face-to-face, and wrap everything together with stretch wrap. I then wrap all components with mover's blankets, and stretch wrap again. Maybe a couple of quart and gallon storage bags, and a small box for hardware. I generally use a 27 gallon storage tote, which fits everything, including pockets, castings and ball return tray.

If it's not already marked, be sure to mark each slate location. The frame should be factory stamped.

Be careful that you don't bend the ball return rails. Absolutely remove them from the frame. In fact, my first step is to remove the pockets. Second is to remove the ball return.

Might as well continue the procedure:
- Remove hardware securing the ball return tray to the frame
- Remove rail bolts (middle bolt on foot rail requires a shallow socket and ratchet, accessed from the ball storage tray)
- Remove rail top assembly, flip it upside-down, and rest it back on the table (lift head end first to clear the slate, then slide the assembly toward the foot end of the table to clear the ball return tray, then lift the foot end above the table)
- Remove the corner brackets that secure the aprons together
- Remove the bolts that secure each apron the the rail top assembly, as well as the small bolts that secure the end aprons to the ball storage tray
- Remove the bots that secure the ball storage tray (you may or may not wish to separate the ball return tray from the ball storage tray)
- Remove the castings from the rails, by removing the bolts that secure each
- Remove the cloth (make sure that there are NO staples on the underside of each slate)
- Remove screws that secure slates to the frame. These are in-set from the screws that hold the slates to the liners (DO NOT REMOVE THESE)
- Remove slates (Gold Crown III slates should not have alignment dowels)
- Remove inner frame support members
- Remove end frame members (4 bolts total)
- Remove side frame members (4 bolts total, securing members to pedestals)

Personally I like removing the skirts right after the ball return. Makes everything much easier to get to.


Sent from my iPad using AzBilliards Forums
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Personally I like removing the skirts right after the ball return. Makes everything much easier to get to.


Sent from my iPad using AzBilliards Forums

If the table is a Gold Crown I or II, I might agree with you. However, Gold Crown III, IV, V, and VI are designed differently. They are designed to remove the entire rail top assembly as one piece.
 

David in FL

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Just a thought. After spending “a huge amount” to build your room, is the effort and potential downside, whatever it may be, really worth quibbling over another $500?
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Just a thought. After spending “a huge amount” to build your room, is the effort and potential downside, whatever it may be, really worth quibbling over another $500?
This is a good point. Generally, when I am asked to move and set up a pool table, I provide a combined cost, which includes a number of factors. The $375 set up fee, in this case, seems a bit low. I would second the suggestion of a previous poster, to confirm the actual set up price, without the move.
 

ThinSlice

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
If the table is a Gold Crown I or II, I might agree with you. However, Gold Crown III, IV, V, and VI are designed differently. They are designed to remove the entire rail top assembly as one piece.

Removing the skirts doesn’t change any of that. You have to remove them regardless.


Sent from my iPhone using AzBilliards Forums
 

noMoreSchon

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The slate is pinned. Do not lift up on the slate until they are apart.
You will be very disappointed in yourself. Many people have moved GC and not known about that, which is why you see slates that are super bondoed at the seams.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JC

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The slate is pinned. Do not lift up on the slate until they are apart.
You will be very disappointed in yourself. Many people have moved GC and not known about that, which is why you see slates that are super bondoed at the seams.
Not true. You can slightly lift up on the end slates to break the seam without damaging the pins or slate. SLIGHTLY.
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
The slate is pinned. Do not lift up on the slate until they are apart.
You will be very disappointed in yourself. Many people have moved GC and not known about that, which is why you see slates that are super bondoed at the seams.
The table referenced is a Gold Crown III. Not likely to be pinned.
 
Top