Is there anyone still know/remember Play Master pool table?

kevina

RASSON BILLIARDS
Is there anyone know about Play Master pool table? It's a big billiard name like Brunswick about ten years ago, but seems not any more in the market.

Is there anyone still remember this brand or ever played on a Play master table? How do you think about it?
 

ROB.M

:)
Silver Member
Table

Is there anyone know about Play Master pool table? It's a big billiard name like Brunswick about ten years ago, but seems not any more in the market.

Is there anyone still remember this brand or ever played on a Play master table? How do you think about it?

-

C.L. Bailey, Winslow Gameroom and The Level Best

Charles Bailey started his own pool table manufacturing company, Play Master, in 1973. Play Master then acquired Renaissance,
a high-end custom pool table manufacturer, and the company became known as Play Master-Renaissance. His son Chuck,
who grew up working in the factory, joined the company full time after graduating from college in 1988. “Play Master was one of the largest
domestic pool table manufacturers in 1993, when AMF Bowling approached us about buying the company. I took them up on their offer, and decided to
give retirement a try. Retirement was tough. I was used to working long hours, and suddenly I had all of this free time on my hands.” – Charles Bailey

By 1998, both father and son realized they missed owning their own pool table manufacturing company, and founded The C.L. Bailey Co. They
purchased an 80,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Marionville, Missouri, and began manufacturing pool tables in late 1999.



Rob.M
 

Sealegs50

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I purchased a new 9' AMF Grand Prix in late 1997. Some documents maintain the AMF PlayMaster name and some look to be retiring the PlayMaster part. My table has 3-piece 1" Italian slate. The frame looked like a GC. I believe the rails are K-66, but I don't have documentation to confirm. When the table was new, I did not like the AMFast rails. They were too stiff and the cue ball bounced when rebounding off them. Bank shots on the AMF were played differently than the GC tables in the local pool hall. After a couple years of use, the rubber came to play more like GCs and were not such an issue. Now, I cannot tell the difference. Pockets are very wide. I would like to redo the rails and pockets to 4.5", but don't know if the rail beds are also similar to GC and worth the expense to upgrade. The table has held up well in the 18 years I've owned it. Except for a 6 year period when I worked away from home during the week, the table has seen daily play.
 

Attachments

  • Basement3.jpg
    Basement3.jpg
    42.4 KB · Views: 4,608
Last edited:

kevina

RASSON BILLIARDS
Rob, thanks and very good story, seems you know much about the history of Play Master! Have you ever played on any playmaster table? How's the quality?

Do you think the young generation in US know this brand?
 

kevina

RASSON BILLIARDS
I purchased a new 9' AMF Grand Prix in late 1997. Some documents maintain the AMF PlayMaster name and some look to be retiring the PlayMaster part. My table has 3-piece 1" Italian slate. The frame looked like a GC. I believe the rails are K-66, but I don't have documentation to confirm. When the table was new, I did not like the AMFast rails. They were too stiff and the cue ball bounced when rebounding off them. Bank shots on the AMF were played differently than the GC tables in the local pool hall. After a couple years of use, the rubber came to play more like GCs and were not such an issue. Now, I cannot tell the difference. Pockets are very wide. I would like to redo the rails and pockets to 4.5", but don't know if the rail beds are also similar to GC and worth the expense to upgrade. The table has held up well in the 18 years I've owned it. Except for a 6 year period when I worked away from home during the week, the table has seen daily play.


wow, it's a table with long history! Hopefully it still plays well.
 

Scaramouche

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
-

C.L. Bailey, Winslow Gameroom and The Level Best

Charles Bailey started his own pool table manufacturing company, Play Master, in 1973. Play Master then acquired Renaissance,
a high-end custom pool table manufacturer, and the company became known as Play Master-Renaissance. His son Chuck,
who grew up working in the factory, joined the company full time after graduating from college in 1988. “Play Master was one of the largest
domestic pool table manufacturers in 1993, when AMF Bowling approached us about buying the company. I took them up on their offer, and decided to
give retirement a try. Retirement was tough. I was used to working long hours, and suddenly I had all of this free time on my hands.” – Charles Bailey

By 1998, both father and son realized they missed owning their own pool table manufacturing company, and founded The C.L. Bailey Co. They
purchased an 80,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Marionville, Missouri, and began manufacturing pool tables in late 1999.



Rob.M

From the website

In early 2007, The C.L. Bailey Co. was acquired by Armand Billiards Group, part of Armand Capital Group, which also owned Belgium based Saluc SA, maker of the famous Aramith billiard balls.

During 2010, a team lead by Charles Bailey, Chuck Bailey, Shine Lee, Curt Cook and Scott Hickman repurchased certain assets of The C.L. Bailey Co. Today, CLB Assets LLC, doing business as The C.L. Bailey Co., continues as a leading supplier of quality home recreation products to specialty retailers throughout North America, under the trade brands C.L. Bailey pool tables, Level Best billiard accessories, Level Best game room furniture, Winslow game room furniture, and Velocity worsted billiard cloth.

http://www.clbailey.com/about_us
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I purchased a new 9' AMF Grand Prix in late 1997. Some documents maintain the AMF PlayMaster name and some look to be retiring the PlayMaster part. My table has 3-piece 1" Italian slate. The frame looked like a GC. I believe the rails are K-66, but I don't have documentation to confirm. When the table was new, I did not like the AMFast rails. They were too stiff and the cue ball bounced when rebounding off them. Bank shots on the AMF were played differently than the GC tables in the local pool hall. After a couple years of use, the rubber came to play more like GCs and were not such an issue. Now, I cannot tell the difference. Pockets are very wide. I would like to redo the rails and pockets to 4.5", but don't know if the rail beds are also similar to GC and worth the expense to upgrade. The table has held up well in the 18 years I've owned it. Except for a 6 year period when I worked away from home during the week, the table has seen daily play.

They had K66. They were widely used during the PBT days .
The Lion's Den in Las Vegas had like 50 AMF tables . They were all sold after the place closed. One pool hall here in the desert area had some of them.
Local players who are used to GC's did not like them.
 
Top