Light diffusing question...

Diogenes

Registered User
Silver Member
Ok, so I'm tired of the shadows from my 4 globe "basic" billiard lamp and want to build something worthy to hang over my GC-IV table.
I'm building a large hanging box light (similar to a 100" Diamond) and will be using Egg-Crate type diffusers with 2 rows of dual T8 bulbs (4 bulbs total).

My question... is there that much of a difference between using the basic white plastic egg-crate vs. the metallic coated (other than the metallic costing over twice as much). I know in theory the reflective coating should cast light in multiple directions but I'm just wondering if there is actually a negligible difference.

The light will be hung high from a 9' ceiling. I'll go the extra $50-70 that it would cost for reflective if it is going to make that much difference... but I'd rather save my $$$ for other billiard projects and toys.

Thanks 4 any input at all.
 

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
If you're putting the box flush against a 9' ceiling, you might want to put in 6 bulbs instead of 4. Mine is about a foot lower than that, and I can switch on just 4 bulbs or all 6. Usually 4 are enough, but sometimes it's nice to have all 6.

My diffusers are the metallic type, and I don't know whether the plain white ones work well enough.
 

fish on

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok, so I'm tired of the shadows from my 4 globe "basic" billiard lamp and want to build something worthy to hang over my GC-IV table.
I'm building a large hanging box light (similar to a 100" Diamond) and will be using Egg-Crate type diffusers with 2 rows of dual T8 bulbs (4 bulbs total).

My question... is there that much of a difference between using the basic white plastic egg-crate vs. the metallic coated (other than the metallic costing over twice as much). I know in theory the reflective coating should cast light in multiple directions but I'm just wondering if there is actually a negligible difference.

The light will be hung high from a 9' ceiling. I'll go the extra $50-70 that it would cost for reflective if it is going to make that much difference... but I'd rather save my $$$ for other billiard projects and toys
Thanks 4 any input at all.

silver parabolic reflects light output down on table giving a higher lume the opposite of black
if you want/need to get even more light on table you can put silver paper above lamps this can be done for any light use t8 daylight full spectrum tubes as these are suppose to be better for eyes
 
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sjb

evolving player
Silver Member
I built a light exactly like you're describing.at first I had the white egg crate diffusers in it, which were fine. But then later I got some of the deeper silver parabolic diffusers and they are much better. They're more expensive, but worth it. The light is much more focused on the table surface, and there is much less glare overhead when you are down on a shot.
 

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fish on

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I built a light exactly like you're describing.at first I had the white egg crate diffusers in it, which were fine. But then later I got some of the deeper silver parabolic diffusers and they are much better. They're more expensive, but worth it. The light is much more focused on the table surface, and there is much less glare overhead when you are down on a shot.

nice what tubes
 

rottenrod

Registered
I would go with 3 sets of lights, metallic diffuser and if you can, lower it to about 3ft above the table surface. Here's a shot of one I built for a friend some time back:
rodtable.jpg
 

swami4u

Banned
Paint the interior of the light box Flat white.......Not gloss ect ect....just natural white color matte finish. :grin-square:

This will assure you have all the avaliable light going down.

I would use a 10k bulb also, it's more of a crisp white light, the 5500k and 6500k have a yellow tint to them. When not playing pool, you could grow some plants under the 10k's! :groucho:
 

Diogenes

Registered User
Silver Member
Actually I'm going to drop the light down to about 8' with a 1' gap from ceiling. I may run 3 rows of duals (actually quads since I'm running 2- 4' T8s to equal 8'... easier to store). But the egg crate answer looks as though the sliver is worth the money and being a purest at the sport... I'll never be happy with almost on my own table. All of the bulbs will be 5000k as my research seems to show that is the best light spectrum for billiards.
Thanks to everyone for helping me answer my question. Logic told me that silver was probably worth the extra $$$... just wasn't sure how much without going to those who have "been there and done that".

BTW... I'm also designing an AC powered cross beam laser pointer into the light (I hate ball spots on a quality cloth) complete with a remote control on and off switch. I'm just not sure if it would be safe with reflection coming off of a set of freshly cleaned Super Amamiths or Centennials. I'm pretty good without the glue spot but others sometimes just can't find a blind mark.

Anyway thanks to all... I'm going to like hanging out here.
 
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fish on

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Actually I'm going to drop the light down to about 8' with a 1' gap from ceiling. I may run 3 rows of duals (actually quads since I'm running 2- 4' T8s to equal 8'... easier to store). But the egg crate answer looks as though the sliver is worth the money and being a purest at the sport... I'll never be happy with almost on my own table.
Thanks for the input.

grrt I will say one last time I recommend T8 4' full spectrum daylight 6500k tubes as these simulate natural daylight characteristics and create a good bright white light!
10k lights ??? tell me about these? where can ya get them at and cost for them? ty t8 Daylight tubes at HD are 33 bucks for a 10 pack
 
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swami4u

Banned
grrt I will say one last time I recommend T8 4' full spectrum daylight 6500k tubes as these simulate natural daylight characteristics and create a good bright white light!
10k lights ??? tell me about these? where can ya get them at and cost for them? ty t8 Daylight tubes at HD are 33 bucks for a 10 pack


After further thought' i would Prob. just go with 6500k and save the extra $$$$

10k bulbs are prob. overkill.
 

BobY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Be sure you get a good quality ballast and lamp. The electronic ballast should have an efficiency rating on it with the higher number being better. This will make a bigger difference as opposed to lamp change. Good brands of ballast are GE, Sylvania, and Advance.

Many of the lamp manufacturers have a better quality lamp. I used to sell GE for my job and theirs were marked with an SPX for better phosphers and color. Having better quality products can effect light levels by 20% or more.
 

cool_hand_ljb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
paint

I built a 8' light for my 10' table. I used a metallic spray paint to paint them and you can't tell the difference between my defuser and one that comes already coated. Well except for the fact I went with gold instead of chrome becai I built my light out of oak and the gold looks better with it.
 

Diogenes

Registered User
Silver Member
sjb, You're right... that light of yours is exactly where I'm going with my project. I was originally thinking that two 8-foot quad fixtures was going to be enough and the pic that you posted seems to be a good amount of light over the table without being too little or too much. I think that I'll stick with that line of thought. It will probably be overwhelming at first once I drop my classic 4 globe.

On another note... if memory recalls I used to use 10k lighting in my salt-water fish tanks. I'm not sure if that would be the right choice... but I will look into it. I do remember that it blinded my lion fish so bad that they wouldn't eat.
As for the 6500k lights... they are getting into the blue spectrum of the Kelvin chart. I am using 6500k bulbs now and I can notice it just a touch. 5000k is rated as "pure white" or "full spectrum" and I read somewhere recently that 5000-5500k is the recommended and most common used Kelvin value by the PBA in most major tournaments and suggested by the BCA.
I'll see if I can find where I read this info and post the site info.

When the cost gets lower I'll forgo the ballast all together and just go full led tubes. I'll have to post a pic of my room in a few weeks when I get my light finished.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Actually I'm going to drop the light down to about 8' with a 1' gap from ceiling.

Diamond recommends 78 inches from the floor to the bottom of the light
shade.
I feel that any higher than this is for lighting your whole room....
...which detracts from that 'je nais sais quoi' that a light gives you
when it is single purpose...for the table only.

...although I might be outta line giving advice about lamps to a man who
calls himself Diogenes...:wink:
 

Sloppy Pockets

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Interesting discussion, and very timely as I am finally getting ready to hang my light. Good to know the correct height.

I have been playing under a solitary compact fluorescent 23W bulb (supposedly 100W equivalent) that is 6500K. It seems brighter than other bulbs of similar wattage, but a bit harsh after playing awhile. I'm putting up a three-light fixture (table is a large 8) that is supposed to have 75W incandescents in it as a maximum. I found some 26W G.E. Reveal CFL floods that produce 1150 lumens.

I don't see the temp of the light listed, but the Reveal bulbs have a rare earth coating in them that filters out the yellows that make things look dingy. They are advertised as producing "clean, beautiful light" (whatever that means), and are supposed to be "full spectrum". I've used a Reveal incandescent for years in the gooseneck lamp on my repair bench because it gives me the best color match to actual sunlight when I do touch up work. Nothing worse than taking a finished repair out to look at in the sunlight and seeing it is tinged with red.

I'm hoping that the tripling of my previous light output, coupled with a better color, closer distance, and the downward funneling of light provided by a flood all work to give me a more pleasant playing experience. If not, I'll be putting this thing up for sale and building my own diffusing fixture.
 

Diogenes

Registered User
Silver Member
Diamond recommends 78 inches from the floor to the bottom of the light
shade.
I feel that any higher than this is for lighting your whole room....
...which detracts from that 'je nais sais quoi' that a light gives you
when it is single purpose...for the table only.

...although I might be outta line giving advice about lamps to a man who
calls himself Diogenes...:wink:
pt109, Actually i won't be too far off the 78" (or 48" from the playing surface) at the base of my light after all is said and done. I'm currently at "bridge of my nose" level" with my standard light simply to avoid glare. However with the new light I want it to illuminate the "table only" as much as possible and no more. One thing for sure is that the higher the lighting the less shadowing... but somehow I don't think I'll have much shadowing at any height with this new light. I'll be adjusting it up and down until I hit around the outer edge of the table.

In short... I couldn't agree with you more. BTW... LOL... nice touch on the Diogenes/lamp reference. And may I say JFK was always one of my biggest heros.
 

Diogenes

Registered User
Silver Member
@Sloppy Pockets... I found that those standard 3 and 4 globe lights need to be below eye level
unless you want to be blinded at times between shots. They get you by and are quite acceptable
but at times your guest will clang a globe with a wild uplifting break.

Also if you have 3 lights you will have 3 shadows and in my case 4 lights= 4 shadows. I find it
easier to focus on my aim without all of the multiple shadows.

If your bulbs are rated at "full spectrum" then they are likely 5000 Kelvin. I personally believe that
is the acceptable color range for a table of any color cloth. I also noticed today at Home Depot that
the lux values on the 5000k lamps were much higher than those on the same 6500k.

I got used to my current lighting but I knew in the beginning that it was just a temporary thing to
get me by while I educated myself on lighting, cloth maintenance (and break-in) and built the rest
of the room around my table.

I hope you enjoy your new light.
 
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