My new Cue Arrived from Coos Cues

NevadaP

Active member
The first of two cues John is building for me finally arrived. This one has a burled walnut handle with forearm and butt of Cocobolo. The core is a Lignum Vitae, so it is about 20 ounces. I asked John to make matching joint protectors for both shafts and the butt. These photos do not do justice to these beautifully finished pieces. John's attention to detail is over the top. The finish on the shafts is the smoothest I've ever encountered. The detail in the ringwork is exceptional. Note how the inserts in the rings Iine up from butt to joint. encourage anyone looking for a unique cue and work of art to check out John's videos on his Rumble Channel (start at cooscues.com). I am expecting another from John in the coming weeks.
Cocobolo with Burl Walnut and purple heart core.JPG
Coos Cues joint protectors.jpg
 

NevadaP

Active member
It is much nicer than the photos. It plays very well, which is not a surprise. Check John's site out, and his pricing. I don't think many can touch his quality and price point, maybe none.
 

Bishop

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
John’s cue making videos are fantastic. I really like the stuff he’s putting out. He’s got a good eye for unique woods too.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
:):)Very nice! Lining up ringwork inserts is something I rarely see, even from many well known cue makers, as well as lining up inlays AND ringwork inserts all together throughout the cue. It is truly a sign that this maker really cares about every inch of quality in his work!! CONGRATS
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I remember early/ mid 60s cues - some builders were using Walnut for the forearm without points, guys like Sailor and Abe Rich made some Walnut forearm cues; some of it may be the cost or availability of that wood today. Ron Caudle from Conyers, Georgia used Walnut at times in his beautifully made custom cue and shotgun cases. My one remaining Caudle Cue case dates back 20 years- not sure if he is around any more.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I love the look of wrap less cues with strong contrast in appearance - darker butt sleeve and forearm and lighter wood handles - yours was a great choice of woods! I recently won the auction for a SAWDUST cue made by Jack Tan in Singapore- he does a very nice maple handle with contrasting ebony butt sawdust1.JPGsawdust2.JPGsleeve and forearm - mine is a four pointer as well :
 

NevadaP

Active member
I was told by a cuemaker that walnut is too light of a wood, although I think, like you, it is exceptionally beautiful. Of course, I don`t know if that is a fact
John has developed an elaborate spreadsheet whereby he establishes the density of each wood type and then can estimate very closely what the final cue weight will be with different woods for forearm, butt and core. As you point out, the walnut has a relatively low density. In this case, that was offset with the use of the Lignum Vitae core, which is very dense.
I highly recommend John's videos on his processes. His attention to detail and his patience are astounding. The video on how he attached the forearm and butt to the core convinced me of his dedication. All the small steps and considerations in each step are impressive. I honestly don't understand how he can meet his current price point.
 

NevadaP

Active member
I love the look of wrap less cues with strong contrast in appearance - darker butt sleeve and forearm and lighter wood handles - yours was a great choice of woods! I recently won the auction for a SAWDUST cue made by Jack Tan in Singapore- he does a very nice maple handle with contrasting ebony butt View attachment 663011View attachment 663012sleeve and forearm - mine is a four pointer as well :
Very nice. I agree.
 

sammylane12

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
John has developed an elaborate spreadsheet whereby he establishes the density of each wood type and then can estimate very closely what the final cue weight will be with different woods for forearm, butt and core. As you point out, the walnut has a relatively low density. In this case, that was offset with the use of the Lignum Vitae core, which is very dense.
I highly recommend John's videos on his processes. His attention to detail and his patience are astounding. The video on how he attached the forearm and butt to the core convinced me of his dedication. All the small steps and considerations in each step are impressive. I honestly don't understand how he can meet his current price point.
That is all very interesting, especially about the wood density
 
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