Please help identifying this table.

DnaPetty

New member
This pool table was purchased by my grandmother in the mid 60's. Its been passed around the family a few times throughout the years and has certainly seen some wear during that time. Its a wood top table with ball return. On the bottom of the table you can see where there used to be labels glued to it, but all that remains of them is a small torn piece of paper with the single word "Minnesota". I dont know if that means it was manufactured in Minnesota or not, but any help would be appreciated.
 

Attachments

  • Pool Table.jpg
    Pool Table.jpg
    94.3 KB · Views: 56

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This pool table was purchased by my grandmother in the mid 60's. Its been passed around the family a few times throughout the years and has certainly seen some wear during that time. Its a wood top table with ball return. On the bottom of the table you can see where there used to be labels glued to it, but all that remains of them is a small torn piece of paper with the single word "Minnesota". I dont know if that means it was manufactured in Minnesota or not, but any help would be appreciated.
I have no clue but it looks cool as hell. Those metal aircraft-style corner castings just scream 1960's. UD: it could be an Armac. They made some MinnesotaFats-series tables back in the day.
 
Last edited:

DnaPetty

New member
I have no clue but it looks cool as hell. Those metal aircraft-style corner castings just scream 1960's. UD: it could be an Armac. They made some MinnesotaFats-series tables back in the day.
Thanks Garczar!
I tried googling "Minnesota pool tables" and totally went down a rabbit hole reading about Minnesota Fats. Super interesting read. I should look more into the Minnesota Fats pool tables though. I think originally i made the assumption that Minnesota Fats wouldn't endorse a wood top table, but what do i know?
 
Last edited:

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks Garczar!
I tried googling "Minnesota pool tables" and totally went down a rabbit hole reading about Minnesota Fats. Super interesting read. I should look more into the Minnesota Fats pool tables though. I think originally i made the assumption that Minnesota Fats wouldn't endorse a wood top table, but what do it know?
Minnesota Fats would have endorsed Hitler if they paid him enough..
 

forabeer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not sure of the brand but 3 things stand out to me . . .
1- Unique corner castings (never seen any like those)
2- Rails that have more cloth surface area than wood/laminate (never seen that either)
3- Side pocket openings look like they extend into playing surface (to the point of altering a slow roll down the rail?)
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Interesting looking table - sounds like granny's table has been well used & loved, and a great addition to multiple generations of extended family. Can't beat that. (Didn't Shane learn from his grandma?)

Its a wood top table

Do you mean the features are wood as opposed to formica?
Or do you mean it is not slate?

smt
 

PoodlePuncher

Registered
I have no clue but it looks cool as hell. Those metal aircraft-style corner castings just scream 1960's. UD: it could be an Armac. They made some MinnesotaFats-series tables back in the day.
+1
the thin cabinet screams ARMAC

Here's one that's similar, though not exact

 

DnaPetty

New member
Interesting looking table - sounds like granny's table has been well used & loved, and a great addition to multiple generations of extended family. Can't beat that. (Didn't Shane learn from his grandma?)



Do you mean the features are wood as opposed to formica?
Or do you mean it is not slate?

smt
It is MDF, not slate. I have looked into redoing it with slate or some type of substitute but i dont think the frame is strong enough to support it. The MDF does need to be replaced though as its no longer perfectly flat.
 

PoodlePuncher

Registered
It is MDF, not slate. I have looked into redoing it with slate or some type of substitute but i dont think the frame is strong enough to support it. The MDF does need to be replaced though as its no longer perfectly flat.
the cost and work involved in converting to slate would be extremely prohibitive.
In my opinion, leave it as is. the sentimental value of the table "as is", far outweighs any theoretical benefits of changing it.
 
Top