Pool when we were kids

RichSchultz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Anyone remember the ol rule, if the cue ball is against the rail, you can move it out the width of the cue bumper? Or how about turning the cue around to break with the bumper?

Any other kid rules you can recall?
 

Michael Andros

tiny balls, GIANT pockets
Silver Member
Anyone remember the ol rule, if the cue ball is against the rail, you can move it out the width of the cue bumper? Or how about turning the cue around to break with the bumper?

Any other kid rules you can recall?

When I first began playing on a real table in 1st grade, we did both of those things. Hadn't thought of either in probably more than 50 years. Thanks for the memories.
 

Michael Andros

tiny balls, GIANT pockets
Silver Member
Anyone remember the ol rule, if the cue ball is against the rail, you can move it out the width of the cue bumper? Or how about turning the cue around to break with the bumper?

Any other kid rules you can recall?

If we mis-cued ( probably every third shot at least ) we would just put the cb back and shoot again.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
Another thing we used to permit was resting your hand on a ball that was obstructing your bridge while you shot.
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I can’t even imagine a first grader being tall enough to even bang the ball around.
 

SmokinJoe46

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not a rule of sorts, but how about stuffing the pockets with hats, rags, paper cups so we could play all day with a quarter! (or at least until we got booted out)
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Growing up in the rural Bible Belt playing pool was a big no-no for me and my brothers. The local Pool Hall was off limits. It wasn’t until I reached 15 years old, or so before I was able to sneak in there and play some. Same with playing cards, they weren’t even allowed in the house.
 

mbvl

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Growing up in the rural Bible Belt playing pool was a big no-no for me and my brothers. The local Pool Hall was off limits. It wasn’t until I reached 15 years old, or so before I was able to sneak in there and play some. Same with playing cards, they weren’t even allowed in the house.

Where I grew up they also had "blue laws": 18 and older! I, too, snuck in in my early teens.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Carroms

My first exposure to "pool" was at the age of 8-10 years old, playing "carroms" (yep, that's the real spelling) at the local park/rec center. Only distantly like real pool, but close enough to catch the incurable bug...

pj
chgo

Carrom-Board-Game-750x430.jpg
 

a1712

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
phone books!!

Milk Crates. You know, the ones that say don't steal - Property of such and such. My little brother and I both had are own and spent many a day in our Parents Bar, misspending our youth.....who am I kidding, I'd do it all over again. Brian.
 

Brookeland Bill

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My father took me upstairs to the domino/pool hall in the small town in East Texas where I went to high school. I was 14. All my friends were afraid to go because of the pressure of the so called religious values practiced by and espoused by the Baptist community. When the rest of my friends did show up they had to have a written permission slip from their parents. By that time I was kicking azz and taking names. Other than the Zdairy Queen the pool hall became the big hangout.
 

CESSNA10

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't know about rules but it was not uncommon to play with cues with no tips.
Playing on a concrete floor and dropping the cues as kids do we frequently
had all the cues with tips off. Made it tough to chalk up and also to listen
to DAD when he went down to shoot a few.
 

Michael Andros

tiny balls, GIANT pockets
Silver Member
I can’t even imagine a first grader being tall enough to even bang the ball around.

I'm 6'4" so I was always tall for my age. But, the kid whose house it was was normal size and he got along just fine. I didn't find out until decades later, it was a GC. And it had gold cloth. The kid's father was R I C H. Owned half of Clearwater Beach.
 
Top