questions about video recording

evergruven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
want to record myself more to study/improve my game..a few questions

what's your preferred camera angle to watch/study pool? overhead is good, but you don't get to see the stroke. high up, at an angle?

the table I play on is public, so wondering the best way to mount an iphone a few hours at a time? is a really tall tripod the answer?

gracias-
 

couldnthinkof01

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have enough flaws that I don't need a great angle to spot them. I just put my phone in the handle of my case, on top of the side table.
 

marini3105

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
I use an Amazon basics tripod and cell phone mount, got both for less than $30.

Set up the same shot, mark the ball position on the table. Video it multiple times to find inconsistent behavior. I usually say what happens on the shot and what I thought went wrong so I have context when I watch the video.

Side view you'll want to be far enough away to see your backstroke and follow through. I usually use this view. You can go head on, along the shot line to see if you're lining up on the shot correctly.
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my hero's
Silver Member
If you buying a Tripod don’t go cheap, cheap tripods wobble.

Get a sturdy one you will get better results.
 

Tennesseejoe

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you are trying to examine your stroke, I find the best way is from the rear. The behind movement of your stroke shows the horizontal. This is the most important fundamental in pool. You can judger wrist, forearm, elbow, shoulder, etc., movement and then make adjustments. Try it by shooting 5 foot straight in shots with no spin.
 

mrpiper

Registered
1 Tripod
2 Cell phone video
3 record the same shot from in front of you a few shots, behind you a few shots (you will see variation from straight stroke)
4 record the same shot from the side on your shooting side for several shots. (you will diagnose elbow drop, grip, bridge placement, follow through etc...

This is simple and IT WORKS. You can correct the flaw when you see it and understand it. WAY better than practice near a mirror.
 

u12armresl

One Pocket back cutter
Silver Member
want to record myself more to study/improve my game..a few questions

what's your preferred camera angle to watch/study pool? overhead is good, but you don't get to see the stroke. high up, at an angle?

the table I play on is public, so wondering the best way to mount an iphone a few hours at a time? is a really tall tripod the answer?

gracias-
I have filmed a few different ways.
This one is high up on a table about 8 feet away.

This one is on the bigger table, at the end about 6 feet away, but pretty high up.
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
want to record myself more to study/improve my game..a few questions

what's your preferred camera angle to watch/study pool? overhead is good, but you don't get to see the stroke. high up, at an angle?
The traditional front view gives alot of information, which it's the default shot on streams and videos. Overhead view give the most.
the table I play on is public, so wondering the best way to mount an iphone a few hours at a time? is a really tall tripod the answer?

gracias-
It depends on the environment, and what is available. Smartphone tripods are very to use, portable and affordable. My smartphone is capable of recording 4K, but in that mode it drains the battery. Bringing a charger, powerbank and tripod simply maximize the useful camera feature of my smartphone.

Along with tripods, I've also used ceiling mount brackets, superclamps, c-stands, and auto-poles to get the required camera angle. If the room has Diamond lights, and tables are aligned, perhaps you can rest the camera on a mini tripod from an adjoining table.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
want to record myself more to study/improve my game..a few questions ...
If you are working on your fundamentals and mechanics, the camera mostly needs to see what your cue stick is doing. That means the camera should either be exactly in the line of the shot (cue ball to ghost ball), or directly broadside to the cue stick. What the balls are doing is not so important to this study.

If you are analyzing your pattern play, get the camera as high as possible.
 
Top