Rapid Cue Top Sander??

PickPocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Can anyone tell me.. If there is any difference between the tweeden Brand product, and reproduction's?

I bought one recently paid more for it, because it advertised MADE IN USA TWEEDEN per the add, and got one marked made in china? Am I going to have issues with this unit? or can I expect the same thing in a different box if returned? :confused:
 

bruppert

<Insert witty comment>
Silver Member
I bought one a long time ago and have it somewhere. I honestly didn't care much for it. I used it on some cheap sticks that came with my pool table years ago. It did an acceptable job but I wouldn't use it on any of my good sticks. Then I tried the Porper Trimmer to true up the tip edge and it gouged one of the ferrules. For me, they were both a waste of money.

It doesn't cost much to have a tip replaced and how often do you do it? I had a LePro on my one cue for close to 10 years. I only replaced it because I am switching them all to Snipers. A cuemakers will not charge you much to replace the tip, especially if you already have the tip. Maybe $10 or so.

Actually, if anyone wants to buy that stuff drop me a PM.
 

Blue Hog ridr

World Famous Fisherman.
Silver Member
When I did tips by hand, I used the Tweeten. I found that spinning it really didn't do as good a job as just moving the top from left to right in small strokes, using a bit more downward pressure. I still made sure I put a straight edge on top of the ferrule as you weren't guaranteed a perfect flat.
Sometimes it was good. Other times I had to do a bit of a clean up with a fine file.

Tweeten does make a heavier model than the one most get. I have seen the two side by side and there is a fair difference between the two in terms of weight anyway. I can't tell you if the heavier duty model would work better than the light one.

PS - If I remember, I think mine said Tweeten on the box and China on the sander itself.
There is a video of a Chinese guy replacing a tip. He used what looked like a chisel but I'd guess that it was an oriental type wood working tool. The Japanese have some wonderful hand tools and they can use them like nobodies business. He used the chisel to take away any remnants of the old tip and that was pretty much it. You could do the same with a blade if careful. Use a straight edge and a fine file or a sanding block for the same result.

Either way, you still have to careful with the ferrule.
 
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cuesblues

cue accumulator
Silver Member
I have one of the "imported" rapid sanders, and although I'm not allowed
within 15-feet of a cutter or tube of glue when cues are around,
the Tweeten unit seems to be beefier and more stable.
There was another difference, but I can't remember what is was,
as it's been a while since i've seen a Tweeten rapid sander.
 

radge69

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Like Terry said they don't always sand flat. So I would take whatever shafts you're going to put tips on to a repair man to install a fiber tip pad. At least then if you have to grind, you're not grinding the ferrule, just a cheap tip pad. Also, wrap a half sheet of paper around the shaft where the clamp goes, or you'll have some nice dents in the shaft. Practice on something you don't care about, they can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time.
 

Blue Hog ridr

World Famous Fisherman.
Silver Member
Darn it. Good point Roger. Its been a while since I have used the sander.
Wrap the shaft to protect it from the clamp.
 

PickPocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
HAs anyone tried..

Darn it. Good point Roger. Its been a while since I have used the sander.
Wrap the shaft to protect it from the clamp.

trimming a piece of felt to match the sander edge? or would it cause it to be too narrow for the shaft to fit in as it should?
 

Blue Hog ridr

World Famous Fisherman.
Silver Member
I don't think a piece of table felt. will be too big.

I just used a piece of electrical tape over the jaws so it wouldn't be metal on wood. and also, you don't have to gorilla grip it down. Snug is fine.
 

WildWing

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
To be honest, I think there's so much play in those tools, they're not worth the effort. If you're going to do you own tip replacement, I think it's much better to practice with a medium or fine file to prepare the ferrule. I've been doing that for decades. Also, you can always leave a little layer of the old tip on the cue if you don't want to take it all the way down to the ferrule, and glue the new tip on that.
 

mnb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

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Blue Hog ridr

World Famous Fisherman.
Silver Member
I think you're right Wing. A little play as in, when you rotate the top plate with the abrasive, and you get the knob 180 degrees to the ferrule, it can have a rocking motion, or an uneven amount of downward pressure, hence the ability to not get a good flat.

Thats why I suggested putting an even amount of downward pressure on the plate and going from left to right in small strokes.

If that is all a person is using it for is to replace a tip on their personal cue once in a while, it is perfectly fine.
 
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WildWing

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Agree, Ridr, if the tool is used in small, left to right motions, I think you can get it to work, though I still like the file, with concentration. I sure wouldn't use it like a manual grinder, turning the knob around and around.
 

PickPocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think you're right Wing. A little play as in, when you rotate the top plate with the abrasive, and you get the knob 180 degrees to the ferrule, it can have a rocking motion, or an uneven amount of downward pressure, hence the ability to not get a good flat.

Thats why I suggested putting an even amount of downward pressure on the plate and going from left to right in small strokes.

If that is all a person is using it for is to replace a tip on their personal cue once in a while, it is perfectly fine.

Thanks for all the advice!
 
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