Rings vs. Discs

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I just discovered that pool cues have two different types of “rings”.

First, there are the type I expected -- true rings -- the ring is about three to four mm thick and its center is hollow. Beneath the surface of such rings, one finds the wood of the cue’s body.

Second, there are rings which are “discs” -- round, solid, transverse plates. Beneath the surface of these, one finds only more of the same material across the entire cue body.

Any information is appreciated.

Thank you in advance.
 

cuetrip

Rob Hardman Cues
Silver Member
I've never seen nor heard of solid discs. That would make for a VERY weak junction.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
The Hoppe Ring on my '48-'49 WH Pro is a solid piece of ivory, except for the hole drilled for the screw through it and black butt cap. It is a "disc" as described above.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I know ZERO about cue construction, but I do read/look at a lot of stuff. I was very surprised when I removed my butt cap and found a solid piece of ivory -- I expected a ring. Then I remembered the patterns for made to order decorative rings I had seen on Prather's website: https://prathercue.com/pages/decorative-rings. I assume these are discs? Would you install them as discs or remove the center material and install as a ring? What about other cue components like Joe Gold's silver stitched rings? How are they made? Installed? At any rate, the more I thought about it, the more confused I got. Thus this post.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For all intents and purposes , they are ALL RINGS.
Unless they are T shaped . That way they would not need a hole in them.
Joe Gold stitched rings are milled to a rod. The rod then gets drilled and rings get parted from that tube .
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Right on rods. I had figured them out -- once cut from the rod, they are a true ring. How are the disc types installed? Drilled wide to create ring or are they pinned or doweled?
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The word Disc by itself can be confusing when used in cues. If it has a hole, it's a ring.
Jmo
 

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Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
It does have a hole. Just not what I expected. Among other things, I wondered how often this type was used.
 

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Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It does have a hole. Just not what I expected. Among other things, I wondered how often this type was used.
Yesteryear, it was done quite a bit. But yesteryear also laid the foundation for what we and technology have changed and use today.
Machine options are different.
Glues and epoxies are different.
PEOPLE are different because of the above options.
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Once you know, understand and visualize the constructions used when building cues the answers come naturally.
As an example here is the cue for one of my pupils I'm just working on. Something new for me to learn by doing my first cue with segmented handle with some rings on all positions. Half of the parts are already assembled and glued on the full length core. The rest is ready to go there too.
Whatever construction is used you want it as solid as possible. I'm far from being an expert ... just having some fun by trying & doing. I'm still very eager to see if it turns out beautifully after turning it down).
 

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Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Moving from Brunswick House cues (wonderfully constructed but seldom properly maintained) to my first pos 2-piece (for which I did everything I knew) was an improvement because it provided me with a consistent, although inferior, cue. My first custom purchased in '78 was a dream, but it could not compete with many "good" 21st century production cues. The custom cues most folks produce today are incredible -- they defy adequate written or verbal description, however a mere minute of handling one can convey everything one needs to know.

In all I have encountered, a thorough knowlege of a subject has proved of great benefit. I want to know as much as I can about subjects that interest me. Thankfully, folks here at AZB are incredibly knowledgable and are also generous in sharing their knowledge. I only wish that the learning opportunities of today had existed 50 years ago.
 
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