Sax Dal Porto

L.S. Dennis

Active member
Yes his wife‘s name was Evelyn, quite an attractive woman in those days.
I remember how hard Sax would practice when he knew he’d be playibg Jimmy Caras in an upcoming exhitbition, he once told me he’d really like to beat that guy, but in the end never did. Back in the sixties, his best game by far was nine ball, I think he took a 7th at the Stardust in Vegas in the late sixties.

We kids (early teens) would alway love to get in Shorty’s 55 Buick and go watch him when he managed the billiard portion of Sea Bowl out on the coast. He was a very nice man and like Tugboat would share his knowledge of the game with us younger players.
 

poolinSCC

New member
Anyone remember Sax?
I was in high school around 1970 or so when I won a small local tournament in Mtn. View California and thereby won the opportunity to later play the "Masked Marvel". I did not know it at the time and I did not know who he was but I later learned he was Sax Del Porto. He strolled into the poolroom wearing a black executioner type mask covering his entire head. We began to play a game of 14.1 race to 100 or 150 , I don't recall. Anyway, shaking like a leaf, I ran the first 14 or so and missed. He then ran the rest out to win the match. He then put on a trick shot exhibition afterwards. Always a gentlemen as I recall. This is my first post. The pool hall was called "The Fun Center". It had archery too. Dorothy Wise played there. Anyone remember her? She was the Alison Fisher of her day. She loved straight pool and would give me tips but I was too young stupid and chavanistic to seriously listen to her.
 

L.S. Dennis

Active member
I was in high school around 1970 or so when I won a small local tournament in Mtn. View California and thereby won the opportunity to later play the "Masked Marvel". I did not know it at the time and I did not know who he was but I later learned he was Sax Del Porto. He strolled into the poolroom wearing a black executioner type mask covering his entire head. We began to play a game of 14.1 race to 100 or 150 , I don't recall. Anyway, shaking like a leaf, I ran the first 14 or so and missed. He then ran the rest out to win the match. He then put on a trick shot exhibition afterwards. Always a gentlemen as I recall. This is my first post. The pool hall was called "The Fun Center". It had archery too. Dorothy Wise played there. Anyone remember her? She was the Alison Fisher of her day. She loved straight pool and would give me tips but I was too young stupid and chavanistic to seriously listen to her.
Welcome aboard, yes Sax did do the Masked Marvel thing for a whiLe. I think he actually did some work for Brunswick and that might have part of his obligation with them.

I knew Dorothy quite well, (check out may article entitled ‘Memories of Dorothy Wise’ on this forum. In fact I mentioned the place in Mt. View that you talked about, I didn’t remember the name Fun Center but it must have been the same place. Good to hear from someone who remembers those times.
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was in high school around 1970 or so when I won a small local tournament in Mtn. View California and thereby won the opportunity to later play the "Masked Marvel". I did not know it at the time and I did not know who he was but I later learned he was Sax Del Porto. He strolled into the poolroom wearing a black executioner type mask covering his entire head. We began to play a game of 14.1 race to 100 or 150 , I don't recall. Anyway, shaking like a leaf, I ran the first 14 or so and missed. He then ran the rest out to win the match. He then put on a trick shot exhibition afterwards. Always a gentlemen as I recall. This is my first post. The pool hall was called "The Fun Center". It had archery too. Dorothy Wise played there. Anyone remember her? She was the Alison Fisher of her day. She loved straight pool and would give me tips but I was too young stupid and chavanistic to seriously listen to her.


This is from a post a few years ago in which I reminisced about one of my first pool halls:

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One day I was playing on a table near the center of the room and was surprised to see the legendary Tugboat Whaley walk into the room.

Ancient, slightly bowed, but still rosy-cheeked, with pure white hair, suspenders in place, he confidently shuffled in, opened up a beat up old black cylindrical leather case, pulled out his brass jointed cue and start hitting balls with a soft easy grace. Shortly thereafter, I was again surprised when I saw Dorothy Wise, then several times Women's U.S 14.1 Open champ come in. Trim, grandmotherly, and coiffed, she put her own cue together and they began to spar, stopping occasionally for Tugboat to impart some bit of wisdom to Ms. Wise. I probably made two balls that afternoon, as I strained to listen in above the juke box and glean whatever crumbs of knowledge floated from their table.
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Lou Figueroa
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
He was still playing into the 1980s in tournaments in the SF Bay Area. I remember playing him 9 ball at the Palace in SF. (The weekly tournament was run by "Scratchy John".) I also played him 14.1 once at San Jose State when the manager of the rec center there ran quite a few tournaments with the encouragement of Hal Mix. He was past his peak but still expected to finish in the money.
 

L.S. Dennis

Active member
He was still playing into the 1980s in tournaments in the SF Bay Area. I remember playing him 9 ball at the Palace in SF. (The weekly tournament was run by "Scratchy John".) I also played him 14.1 once at San Jose State when the manager of the rec center there ran quite a few tournaments with the encouragement of Hal Mix. He was past his peak but still expected to finish in the money.
Bob, I remember Sax playing well into the 1980’s mostly at Executive Billiard in Redwood City and as you say was well past his prime. I first met him as Jimmy and Dorothy’s Sequoia Billiards over on main street in Redwood City back in the 60’s. He was a nice man who loved the 49ers and like Tugboat was free with his knowledge for us younger players.
 
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