SLOW BACK SWING

Tin Man

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Jerry Brieseth showed me a good one. Put the cue ball maybe 8" from the middle of the end rail. Practice kicking it to the end rail and back.

Here's the kicker - you have to shoot one handed, and you have to bring your tip back past the cushion to the middle of the rail. In other words, if you draw back two more inches the cue stick falls to the floor.

The point is this - when you shoot you can't jam your stick or it will go haywire. You have no bridge and it's 'off the rails'. You have to carefully get the cue stick moving forward and on the right track, then as the cue tip clears the cushion nose you can start to add swing speed to make a good hit. At first it's hard, with practice you can get an accurate 4 rail speed lag with near center.

Get a feel for this rhythm. Back, start the cue ball on the right track forward, swing. Back, get in the groove, swing. Then work on that rhythm on normal shots.
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Look up Tom Rossman videos, I think on CSI site. He's got some good stuff about things like that.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
shouldn't have to. your stroke should be whatever it is that you can repeat all the time. and that is the one that feels the most comfortable when even under stress.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
shouldn't have to. your stroke should be whatever it is that you can repeat all the time. and that is the one that feels the most comfortable when even under stress.
Yes, the correct stroke should be repeatable and yes, you should be comfortable enough with a stroke that you can perform it even under pressure- but that does not mean one should repeat an incorrect stroke over and over- the guy is trying to IMPROVE his performance- so let's just try to help him with constructive assistance- repeating something that is incorrect makes no sense at all.

I would suggest that he attempt to add a slight pause to the end of his back swing just prior to moving the stroke forward- once he becomes comfortable with the pause- he will unconsciously slow down the backswing to accommodate this brief pause- and it will also help correctly separate the triceps induced backstroke with the biceps induced forward cue stroke
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
thats assuming your stroke is the correct one or an improvement for him or anyone else.
 

Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Yes, the correct stroke should be repeatable and yes, you should be comfortable enough with a stroke that you can perform it even under pressure- but that does not mean one should repeat an incorrect stroke over and over- the guy is trying to IMPROVE his performance- so let's just try to help him with constructive assistance- repeating something that is incorrect makes no sense at all.

I would suggest that he attempt to add a slight pause to the end of his back swing just prior to moving the stroke forward- once he becomes comfortable with the pause- he will unconsciously slow down the backswing to accommodate this brief pause- and it will also help correctly separate the triceps induced backstroke with the biceps induced forward cue stroke
All true here! I'd like to add that ALL pool strokes have a pause at the back, whether it's intentional or accidental. It's just about how long or short it is. Physics says you have to stop the backward movement, to some degree, to change direction and accelerate smoothly. Otherwise you will jerk the cue forward starting your forward stroke.

Scott Lee
2019 PBIA Instructor of the Year
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pay closer attention to the pause that occurs on your back swing
that always precedes your stroke’s forward motion. Feel the pause
a little more and you will be able to feel the backswing motion more
and how quickly you are cocking your stroke. Don’t fan a six gun if
you are trying to aim and hit the bullseye. There is rhythm to everyone’s
pool stroke and you want to feel the movement and control it.

Here is an simple, easy way to look at your pool stroke. Think of it as
the equivalent of being a violin sometimes and a fiddle others. The
two instruments look identical and it is how you play it, the movement
of the bow, that allows it to produce drastically different musical notes
and sounds. You can play it in a symphony orchestra or on a stage in a
C&W saloon. Your pool stroke is the same. The cue you use is merely
an instrument of sorts. How you play it is analogous to the violin and
fiddle comparison. It is your pool stroke that determines which one it is.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Is there any exercise or drill to help you learn how to slow your backswing down ... thanks
Watching YouTube videos of the players that do it best or even just thinking about them and their tempo is helpful for me - Buddy Hall, Chris Melling, Allison Fisher, Siming Chen, Stephen Lee, just to name a few. All of those players also have pronounced pauses at the completion of their backstrokes.
 

jacob

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Jerry Brieseth showed me a good one. Put the cue ball maybe 8" from the middle of the end rail. Practice kicking it to the end rail and back.

Here's the kicker - you have to shoot one handed, and you have to bring your tip back past the cushion to the middle of the rail. In other words, if you draw back two more inches the cue stick falls to the floor.

The point is this - when you shoot you can't jam your stick or it will go haywire. You have no bridge and it's 'off the rails'. You have to carefully get the cue stick moving forward and on the right track, then as the cue tip clears the cushion nose you can start to add swing speed to make a good hit. At first it's hard, with practice you can get an accurate 4 rail speed lag with near center.

Get a feel for this rhythm. Back, start the cue ball on the right track forward, swing. Back, get in the groove, swing. Then work on that rhythm on normal shots.
I got to try this drill today. I will be doing it before starting my practice sessions in the future. It really helps you to feel a better rhythm for the stroke.
 

Poolmanis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Try shoot some balls in without cueball.
Just put balls in near end rail and shoot them in directly. Then you can put 100% focus to one aspect what you wanna improve. Do it until it start feel easy and natural. Then start over with cue- and object ball. Easy shots first.

Rinse repeat. Do it couple days 15 minutes. After one week you got it down and it stays. You can use this method to isolating any part on stoke to improve it fast. Like staying still, grip.. anything.
It sounds stupid and boring but it is quite fun when you notice FAST improvement and enjoy that because later you enjoy benefits of this kinda basic work.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just thunk this so Scott Lee welcome to bash. (I think it's a good idea anyway) Try backstroking with a weak resistance band or bungee cord; rubber band if you have one long enough.
 

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
All true here! I'd like to add that ALL pool strokes have a pause at the back, whether it's intentional or accidental. It's just about how long or short it is. Physics says you have to stop the backward movement, to some degree, to change direction and accelerate smoothly. Otherwise you will jerk the cue forward starting your forward stroke.

Scott Lee
2019 PBIA Instructor of the Year
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
I took what Mike was saying is, concentrating on a long(er) pause eliminates or reduces the tendency to rush the backstroke.

I've been working on a longer pause for a few months now. When I lose track of that, my backstroke also tends to speed up.
But maybe that's just me.
 

mark187

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was told by a coach to imagine you're drawing a bow string on the backswing and then releasing.
 
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