Snooker Cue Selection Question

WoodyJ

Sacred Cow=Best Hamburger
Silver Member
I use the same snooker cue for both American Pool and Snooker.

if you aren’t getting into Snooker, then use your American Pool cue. Otherwise you will miscue a lot. Also, the purpose of the 9mm or so tip is is less for accuracy than controlled spin on the cueball. You won’t be able to do this until you’ve practiced with a Snooker cue.

re potting balls. Erase your brain. American Pool players aren’t as inept at potting balls on a Snooker table than they often experience. The issue is more they don’t approach the table the right way. They are like a novice at baseball who swings at wild pitches. Instead, always look for the best ‘strategy’ when you are at the table. Yes, balls are difficult to pot so you may only try to sink a ball 25% of the time. The best snooker players in the world might get to the table a half dozen times before trying to pot a ball.anyways, try out a snooker cue for fun but use your Pool cue.

re length. There’s 128 players on the exclusive Snooker pro circuit. All sizes of players. I don’t know any who use a 61” cue. More likely to go the other way to 56 or 57”. Nothing to do with reach but rather precision. We don’t get a longer handled brush to paint when we need to paint precise details. Also, an extra inch or two of cue use isn’t going to help much on a 12 foot Snooker table. In fact itmight hinder becoming proficient with the rest.
(in competition a player can only bring one cue to the table. Precision is needed on 90% of shots in Snooker. Extra ‘reach’ on maybe 1% so a player isn’t going to sacrifice accuracy for the odd time he needs an extra inch)


Strategy to win. 75% of shots, send the cue down table to bulk...end where you cue off. Repeat. Repeat. Patiently wait to shoot in a red...then cueball back to bulk. Repeat. Unless playing a very good player you will win 80% of games. Your opponent won’t be sinking 12 foot shots unless you leave him a hanger.
What he said: ^^^^^^

I'm a pool player but have played on a 12' snooker table at a friends house twice week for the past several years. Some things I've learned:

(1) Edit: The balls on a 12' international snooker table are 2 1/16" (versus 2 1/8" for 10' American snooker and 2 1/4" for pool). Much smaller than pool balls.

(2) The rules are different from American snooker. I haven't played American snooker but understand that a legal hit is like in pool (i.e., after the cue contacts an object ball something must either touch a rail or go in a pocket). International snooker on a 12' table only requires that you contact the object ball with the cue ball. So, way easier to play a safety/snooker. For example:

(2a) if you've made a red and are on a colored ball that's near a rail you can kick the cue off the rail and bring it to rest just touching the colored ball and hide behind it, or
(2b) if you are shooting a red ball and it's to the side and behind a colored ball you can hit the red straight ahead and bring the cue ball to rest behind the colored ball, or
(2c) if you are shooting a colored ball and are close to it and don't have a good shot, just barely touch the colored ball with the cue ball and leave the cue behind the colored ball

(3) Most pool players at first try to shoot pocket speed (i.e., too slow). Then when they miss it sets the opponent up. Shoot a bit harder than you normally would and when you miss the ball will often squirm its way out of the pocket and land a foot or two away along one of the rails. If you are shooting down a rail and the object ball barely touches the rail on the way to the pocket, the ball is not going into the pocket. So, shooting softer and hoping the object ball will rattle its way in the pocket like in pool in is foolish because if you don't hit the pocket dead center it's not going in.

(4) I use my regular pool que (12.65 mm tip). I've tried my friend's snooker cues but I never got used to them. At first go with your pool cue that you are used to. You won't be able to get much draw -- just deal with it and hit the cue ball on the center line (i.e., no left or right english or screw as they call it). Then try out your friends snooker cue after you get used to the table and rules. I'll probably eventually get a snooker que but I'm in no hurry.

(5) My friend's table has more than half a dozen bridges of varying shapes. Plus, two longer pairs of what he calls the big lumber. The short lumber is a 7-8 foot bridge paired with the same length cue. The big lumber bridge and cue are 9-10 feet long and the cue has a noticeable sag in the middle due to gravity when in use.

(6) There are no spots or diamonds on the rails. So, when I need to kick at something when I'm snookered, I first figure out where I need to hit the rail (with no side spin) and lock my gaze on that point on the cushion until I'm down on the cue ball and shoot. Whereas, in pool I just figure out where I need to hit the rail relative to a spot and don't need to fix my gaze before shooting.

(7) When I started playing the record for a run on this table was 27 points. I've beaten that a number of times but don't remember my exact high score (somewhere in the high 30s). I'm a B pool player and hold my own in our local league. So, unless you're a pro or semi-pro, if you can make 20+ points in a run, give yourself a well deserved pat on the back! You are a player and 147 is the maximum.

(8) No jump shots or masse shots allowed. But, curve shots are and will get you out of a lot of snookers. Seems odd to me since on a curve shot the ball leaves the table a little bit.

(9) Snooker will quickly point out any flaws in your stroke. If you miss, figure out why before you sit down and be prepared to work on your stroke.

(10) We pool players tend to stretch to shoot a shot versus using the bridge. Use a bridge!

(11) When you go back to playing pool you will quickly notice if you hit a pocket dead center or touched the rail on a rail shot. What you used to think was a good shot when a ball goes in will often make you say that wasn't good at all -- the pockets on a pool table a just huge and want to suck the ball in.

If you haven't already seen him play, after you've played a few games go on youtube and search for: Ronnie O'Sullivan 147. You'll be amazed at the action he gets on the cue ball and he seemingly shoots equally well both right and left handed.

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Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Surely the ball sizes are as follows?

Snooker- 2 1/16"
American Snooker- 2 1/8"
American Pool- 2 1/4"
Nearly. Here are the international rules:

(b) The balls shall be of an approved composition and shall each have a diameter of 52.5 mm with a tolerance of +/- 0.05 mm.​

That's 2.067 inches which is closer to 2 1/15th than 2 1/16, but it's certainly not 2 1/8th.
 

14.1'er

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Use the snooker cue

If you’ve never played before on a real snooker table, deflection will be the least of your difficulties! 😁


I also recommend ensuring that any young children are out of earshot and any breakables are kept out of reach. Drinking may help too. 😂
🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

vjmehra

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nearly. Here are the international rules:

(b) The balls shall be of an approved composition and shall each have a diameter of 52.5 mm with a tolerance of +/- 0.05 mm.​

That's 2.067 inches which is closer to 2 1/15th than 2 1/16, but it's certainly not 2 1/8th.

Ha, I actually had no idea they were measured in mm, I've only ever seen them advertised as 2 1/16", interesting (and a bit odd, given the table is still referred to as a 12 x 6). I wonder if they changed that at some point in history (maybe when the UK went decimalised)!
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ha, I actually had no idea they were measured in mm,
Everything international is measured in the metric system, and millimeters is one form of linear measurement.

The think that gets me is that the international driver will still say he drove 1,000 kilometres instead of the correct 1 megametre.
 

9ballscorpion

Active member
This coming Thursday I’ll have the opportunity to play snooker on a true 6x12 for virtually the first time ever. I’m playing with a customer / friend who was a regular in our room and moved out of the area a few years ago. He would play snooker on our 5x10 pool table, as we purchased a set of 2-1/4” snooker balls and we marked the table for him, so he could play / practice. Once in a while I would play with him, although we usually played 9-ball on that table. About a year ago he purchased a used 6x12 and recently had it refurbished with new cushion rubbers and cloth.

My question is should I try to play with my 12.2 mm Ignite Mezz shaft and cue with a 4-inch butt extension, or should I play with his backup 61” snooker cue with a considerably thinner shaft / tip he’s offered me to use?

Obviously I’m planning to use minimal if any left or right spin, as I’m sure the smaller, lighter snooker cue ball will deflect completely different than what my subconscious brain has learned to account for when playing pool. It’s not like we’re playing for $, but I take pride in my game and would like to choose the cue that will give me the best chance to play decently.

My apologies if I should have posted this on the snooker forum, but I’m specifically looking for input / advice from those here who play both pool and snooker (with the smaller balls) and whether they choose to use the same or different cues?

I believe that the Snooker balls are much smaller then regular Pool balls, so it is probably best to use the Snooker cue. I really want to relocate the Houston, because they have several Snooker clubs on the west side of Houston, and would love to become a Snooker player, and get myself a decent quality Snooker cue. Probably start off with a Woods cue. I read that they are very good quality, and a very good starter cue, for anyone who wants to get into playing Snooker.

Woods Snooker Cues, Cue Cases And Accessories (woodscues.com)
 

Greg M

Member
I believe that the Snooker balls are much smaller then regular Pool balls, so it is probably best to use the Snooker cue. I really want to relocate the Houston, because they have several Snooker clubs on the west side of Houston, and would love to become a Snooker player, and get myself a decent quality Snooker cue. Probably start off with a Woods cue. I read that they are very good quality, and a very good starter cue, for anyone who wants to get into playing Snooker.

Woods Snooker Cues, Cue Cases And Accessories (woodscues.com)
Currently using a Woods as my snooker cue. I'm not really a fan of the lacquer on their cues, but I doubt you'll be able to find a better starter set than them.
 
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