Snookerpool

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... four points or the value of the highest valued object ball that is contacted first by the cue ball, whichever is higher.
That's not the whole rule in snooker, if you're trying to have similar scoring.
 

RubixOne

Member
That's not the whole rule in snooker, if you're trying to have similar scoring.
I know that. This change is intentional, as it makes the calculation for the penalty value much simpler. I know this rule works because the app I use to play snooker, called Real Snooker 3D, uses it, and I haven't had any problems.
 
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DaveK

Still crazy after all these years
Silver Member
Have you ever seen snooker tables in Canada with the "wrong" rubber on them? (By "wrong" I mean with a triangular cross section.)

I was not aware that L-profile rubber existed until about 2000.
Checked the other day, both snooker tables at The Snooker Shack have the L-profile rubber.

Dave <-- hates taking this thread to the top, and offers apologies to those similarly annoyed
 

Imotv8u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don’t know. I’m so used to both colors I couldn’t even tell you which pool halls I play at have either color. I can’t even tell you what color my 6 is at my house!
Well, I just realized the snooker table we usually play on has an orange six and the other two tables have pink sixes. Arimith snooker balls.
 

Imotv8u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well, I just realized the snooker table we usually play on has an orange six and the other two tables have pink sixes. Arimith snooker balls.
 

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Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Well, I just realized the snooker table we usually play on has an orange six and the other two tables have pink sixes. Aramith snooker balls.
Probably American-size snooker balls -- 2 1/8 -- as opposed to pro balls which are 2 1/16. I don't think they made numbered balls for 2 1/16.
 

Imotv8u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably American-size snooker balls -- 2 1/8 -- as opposed to pro balls which are 2 1/16. I don't think they made numbered balls for 2 1/16.
Yes. These are American snooker balls. I’ve never seen any 2 1/16 snooker balls, even on the 12 foot table I’ve played on.
 

Renegade_56

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
After a recent game of Snookerpool where I noticed that it was hard for my team to catch up after I fouled a lot, I decided to change the penalty value to the four points or the highest valued object ball that is "on" or could be "on," whichever is higher, to make catching up and determining penalty values a little easier.
it just keeps getting better,,,,,,,,,
 

RubixOne

Member
Turns out, I still not sure what the best way to handle penalty values in this game. For now, it is tied to the value of the ball hit first by the cue ball until I can conduct further tests.
 
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DaveK

Still crazy after all these years
Silver Member
After pondering for a bit, I decided that the rules used in the base game would be the best choice for the penalty values. Finally, I can say that this game is completely done.
I think your game was done a long time ago.

Dave
 

DaveK

Still crazy after all these years
Silver Member
Every other rule besides the calculation for the penalty value was done, and hasn't changed since (aside for maybe a little housekeeping/clarification). But after some testing, it turned out that the rule I was using for calculating penalty values of fouls wasn't the one that was best suited for the game. The base game rules for calculating penalty values, despite their complexity, gave the losing player the best chance of catching up. I wanted a penalty value calculation rule that was simple and made sure anyone could win up until the final 15-ball, and through the additional tests it turned out that the base game rules were better than anything I came up with. The only difference here is that I simplified the fouls that always gave maximum points.
Done
verb
1 past participle of do1.
2 Nonstandard. a simple past tense of do1.
auxiliary verb
3 Nonstandard: South Midland and Southern U.S. (used with a principal verb in the past or, sometimes, present tense to indicate completed action):I done told you so. He done eat his lunch.
adjective
4 completed; finished; through:Our work is done.
5 cooked sufficiently.
6 worn out; exhausted; used up. <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< this done

Dave
 

RubixOne

Member
Done
verb
1 past participle of do1.
2 Nonstandard. a simple past tense of do1.
auxiliary verb
3 Nonstandard: South Midland and Southern U.S. (used with a principal verb in the past or, sometimes, present tense to indicate completed action):I done told you so. He done eat his lunch.
adjective
4 completed; finished; through:Our work is done.
5 cooked sufficiently.
6 worn out; exhausted; used up. <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< this done

Dave
Better late than never.
 

SlimSchadey

New member
Oddly enough I attended a demonstration of Snookerpool from Chris Henry last night. Information can be found at 6reds.com. Aramith is producing a set of balls the same size as American pool balls designed for the game.
 

RubixOne

Member
Oddly enough I attended a demonstration of Snookerpool from Chris Henry last night. Information can be found at 6reds.com. Aramith is producing a set of balls the same size as American pool balls designed for the game.
Sorry to burst your bubble, but that is six-reds snooker on a pool table and possibly with some rule changes, not Snookerpool. 6reds and six-reds snooker can indeed be played with pool equipment, but they use the standard "triangle behind the 6-fer" arrangement and are designed around a standard snooker set. Snookerpool was designed with American pool equipment in mind, and the setup is completely different because of this, taking advantage of the diamonds lining the table that otherwise only act as measuring points.
 
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RubixOne

Member
I tried to come up with something simpler then the base game rules for penalty values, and it turns out that system was the best fit for this game. Oh well, better late than never.
 
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SlimSchadey

New member
Sorry to burst your bubble, but that is six-reds snooker on a pool table and possibly with some rule changes, not Snookerpool. 6reds and six-reds snooker can indeed be played with pool equipment, but they use the standard "triangle behind the 6-fer" arrangement and are designed around a standard snooker set. Snookerpool was designed with American pool equipment in mind, and the setup is completely different because of this, taking advantage of the diamonds lining the table that otherwise only act as measuring points.
If by American pool equipment, you mean standard balls 1-15 then you’re correct. But the ball set is the same diameter and weight as American pool balls, you use American pool cues and standard American pool tables. An awful lot of American pool equipment in mind.
 

Renegade_56

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If by American pool equipment, you mean standard balls 1-15 then you’re correct. But the ball set is the same diameter and weight as American pool balls, you use American pool cues and standard American pool tables. An awful lot of American pool equipment in mind.
And, as gallant an effort as the OP has made, the plain and simple fact is the ability to play snooker on a pool table has been around for many years. Go to any billiards supply store and buy a set of 2 1/4" American Snooker balls, take them to your favorite pool table, lay out a few spots as suggested on most any snooker site as to where the number balls spot, as well as the location and size of the Balk area (D). Don't forget to switch the balls, oh, and just download the rules for American snooker, again from most any Snooker site. And there you go, all set, no need to make up rules as you go because you probably don't even know how to play Snooker. Everything has already been done.
 

Flyer

New member
I just picked up a 12 foot Brunswick Gold Crown Snooker Table today here in Canada. My back hurts - those 5 slates are no joke to move - 1.75 Inches thick. Does anybody have any information on these tables like what year they were manufactured or anything else? I haven't been able to find much information at all from researching online. It will sit right next to my new 5' X 10' Soren Sogaard carom table :).
 

Renegade_56

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just picked up a 12 foot Brunswick Gold Crown Snooker Table today here in Canada. My back hurts - those 5 slates are no joke to move - 1.75 Inches thick. Does anybody have any information on these tables like what year they were manufactured or anything else? I haven't been able to find much information at all from researching online. It will sit right next to my new 5' X 10' Soren Sogaard carom table :).
What a find, I'd love to see pics of the room you can fit a 12 and a 10 footer in.
 

Flyer

New member
I'm very fortunate. I'm working on putting together the best private residential pool room on the East Coast of Canada. I have a big workshop attached to my house so when I get the 6 X 12 Gold Crown Snooker table set up I'll have 3 tables in there:

1. 4.5 X 9 Palason Pool table
2. 5 X 10 Soren Sogaard heated Carom table (brand new)
3. 6 X 12 Brunswick Gold Crown Snooker Table.

The snooker table will be going in next to the carom table.
 

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