Technique for trimming a cue tip flush with the ferrule

Deruki

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
When trying to read a long thoughtful reply in a thread where someone has previously inserted a huge picture causing the text to run off the right side of your screen so you can't read it easily, click on the "quote" button as if you are going to quote the post you want to read.

You can then read it without it being blown out by the huge photo in the thread above and use the back button on your browser to go back to the thread.

Hope this helps with the matter at hand.:)
 

troyroy78

I can average 2 ball's :)
Silver Member
Thanks for this, I recently purchased one and am practicing on the technique.

I think so far from experiments is I need to leave a little more on the tip before I use this blade to finish. As if it’s a small amount I am fining it’s not easy to cut.





Maybe you can try a Japanese flat side blade... One side is angle ground and sharpend and the other is flat. With a thin paper backing you can sit the flat side of the blade on the ferrule and trim outward.
 

conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I trimmed 27 tips today on the tip holders and used this tool.
The last tip, 27th trimmed, as turned, and after a light burnish.
It is dulling after 27 tips, as you can see in the shine on the surface after it is cut.
I trim at the one diameter setting from the outside to the chuck and back out again. I'm running 600 rpm.
Measuring the tip holder, the wear appears to be about 0.01mm on diameter after 27 inserts. The cross slide dial looks to still be the same position as when I started.
The difference between the tip holder diameter and the turned tip is about 0.01mm in diameter larger.
The tip is a Super Pro
Neil
 

Attachments

  • As-Turned-R4.jpg
    As-Turned-R4.jpg
    151.8 KB · Views: 112
  • Light-burnish.jpg
    Light-burnish.jpg
    108.5 KB · Views: 110

conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just some more information for those that may be wanting to know.
These will work on a taig type lathe, but need a tool holder that can take the 12mm shank tools. I buy mine from a local supplier. The tools are actually made for small production machines. It is an 8mm round insert for Aluminum. It is also called a profile tool.
Below is the link I get mine from, but the tool numbers and insert numbers is what you need to order. I am not sure of the USA insert and holder numbering system.
For the Taig lathe, I don't think the 1/4 inch centre height holder will be ridgid enough. If you have the quick change holder system then it will work for sure.

link to insert number
https://www.carbidenz.co.nz/rcgx0803m0.html

Link to the 12mm shank tool holder here
https://www.carbidenz.co.nz/sracr1212k08.html

Many brands make them, like Mitsubishi , and Kennametal, and Sandvik, they will be under small tools in their catalogues.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I trimmed 27 tips today on the tip holders and used this tool.
The last tip, 27th trimmed, as turned, and after a light burnish.
It is dulling after 27 tips, as you can see in the shine on the surface after it is cut.
I trim at the one diameter setting from the outside to the chuck and back out again. I'm running 600 rpm.
Measuring the tip holder, the wear appears to be about 0.01mm on diameter after 27 inserts. The cross slide dial looks to still be the same position as when I started.
The difference between the tip holder diameter and the turned tip is about 0.01mm in diameter larger.
The tip is a Super Pro
Neil
That is some serious equipment for trimming tips.
I just use a parting tool till 1/4 mm away. :grin:
Then Irwin blade.
 

EL Picos

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
More the material is soft more the tools need to be sharp and no radius, it's a simple principle for any material.
 

conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Some HSS will not sharpen to as sharp an edge as some carbon steels, due to the grain size of the steel being too large. How ever the HSS will have a greater wear resistance. I faced a piece of acrylic tube yesterday with the round insert. I was very impressed to how good a surface finish it created.
 

Attachments

  • end-face.jpg
    end-face.jpg
    145.1 KB · Views: 47

muskyed

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Neil, those carbide bits, and holders are just like some of the hollowing bits that we use in woodturning. They come in about three diameters I think Just look up Huntertoolsystems. Also sold in most all woodturning stores. Also forgot to add, in woodturning, we just loosen the cutter, and turn it slightly to get a new sharp edge.
 

conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Neil, those carbide bits, and holders are just like some of the hollowing bits that we use in woodturning. They come in about three diameters I think Just look up Huntertoolsystems. Also sold in most all woodturning stores. Also forgot to add, in woodturning, we just loosen the cutter, and turn it slightly to get a new sharp edge.
Yeah they come in 6mm, 8mm 10mm and 12mm diameter. The inserts I use are specific for Al and plastics, and have a little chip breaker in them. There are many brands of these inserts out there. And yes, when it dulls, you just rotate to what ever direction will give a new sharp cutting edge. They can also be micro honed on the outer top part to get another very sharp edge, but the diameter will no longer be the nominal size. No issue if you are just facing or using for general stuff where a specific size is not important. The centre height does change though. When you have taken 8 thou off the top part outer diameter, the centre height has dropped by 4 thou. Not that big of a deal , but can effect some geometries being turned. Some inserts are not as sharp as what the picture or sales rep say they are either.
 

shojingod

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Have anybody thought of using a hand plane blade which you stone sharpen by hand to razor edge. I been using this to do tips by hand but I'm sure it would work with lathe.
 

WilleeCue

The Barefoot Cuemaker
Silver Member
The problem with cutting a tip with a lathe tool is that on all but the hardest tips ... it will fluff the leather as it cuts it.
You will easily destroy an ElkMaster tip trying to do that as they are so soft.
Learn the skill required with a razor sharp blade held in your hands to trim the tip down almost flush.

If you do use a lathe tool to cut the tip you need the sharpest edge you can get and that is High Speed Steel freshly sharpened.
A radius cutting edge (rounded) will cut smoother than a sharp pointed edge.
Dont cut it down flush ... leave it a bit larger than the ferrule and finish it down with fine sandpaper (600 or less) on a backing board.
Give it the slightest bit of taper so that you can see when you get the tip down flush with the ferrule.
Watch what comes off where on the sandpaper to avoid sanding the ferrule.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Have anybody thought of using a hand plane blade which you stone sharpen by hand to razor edge. I been using this to do tips by hand but I'm sure it would work with lathe.
Too dangerous close to the chuck. So you really have todo it long way from the chuck and with spinning support on the tip .
I've seen it done with the shaft laid out full length.
You have to hold the shaft as you turn on the lathe or it could whiplash on you.
A planer blade would work better .
 
Top