Tip popping off

chefjeff

If not now...
Silver Member
Emery cloth is tough and is reused often.

Perhaps it was used before to polish a transmission shaft or something oily or dirty like that and the nest user didn't know it. That would be easy to have happen. I might have done it before, come to think of it.


Jeff Livingston
 

WilleeCue

The Barefoot Cuemaker
Silver Member
I have installed a lot of clear and colored acrylic pads between the ferrule and the tip.
I flat sand the pad with 600 grit just like I do a leather tip.
I then wipe the end of the ferrule with a paper towel and a bit of Acetone.
This removes any contaminants and I think sorta etches the surface.
Once the acrylic pad is glued on and set (Locktite Gel) I cut it to size and wipe it with the acetone before gluing on the tip.

This might work also for the fiber pads but I cant say as I have not installed very many of them.
 

wabelly

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Have not had a problem since I started useing Loctite 401 seems to good for 60 days before dumping it unless it goes cheap ferrel Little high price but its worth it
 

PracticeChampion

Well-known member
It eventually came off again 😟
What I figured out by laying edge of razor blade across ferrel face with light behind it is it's got a very slight concave. So what causes that? How do I fix it?
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
It eventually came off again 😟
What I figured out by laying edge of razor blade across ferrel face with light behind it is it's got a very slight concave. So what causes that? How do I fix it?
Is your lathe dialed in so that when you face the ferrule, the facing is exactly 90 degrees in relation to the length of the ferrule? Both the ferrule face and the pad/tip face need to be VERY flat to each other. What kind of lathe do you have?
 

chefjeff

If not now...
Silver Member
It eventually came off again 😟
What I figured out by laying edge of razor blade across ferrel face with light behind it is it's got a very slight concave. So what causes that? How do I fix it?
If using this, some of these have been known to not be a perfect right angle.

1635426084652.png



Jeff Livingston
 

PracticeChampion

Well-known member
Is your lathe dialed in so that when you face the ferrule, the facing is exactly 90 degrees in relation to the length of the ferrule? Both the ferrule face and the pad/tip face need to be VERY flat to each other. What kind of lathe do you have?
I'll get a picture but I use one of these that's mounted to a board minus that headstock and the head is mounted independent of it so there is definitely a possibility that something moved. I'll have to find my square to ensure again that its 90°. It still cuts to center good but will definitely check the 90 before going further.

Here's also a picture of the concave I was talking about, it's very little but I could see with hard plastic pad especially it being a problem
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20211028-095129.png
    Screenshot_20211028-095129.png
    179.6 KB · Views: 42
  • IMG_20211027_120949614.jpg
    IMG_20211027_120949614.jpg
    145.2 KB · Views: 44

chefjeff

If not now...
Silver Member
No but I bought one of those and the rest of the mushroom cutters, burnisher etc to start out with. All that does work but clamping that big piece of metal to my shaft just didn't feel right.

Wanna buy my kit 😁

I have one in a jar somewhere.

I made my own tool to replace tips. It works just fine and does it all.


Jeff Livingston
 

chefjeff

If not now...
Silver Member
I thought I did too 😒

I understand why if it's not cutting a perfect 90 but just can't figure out how it cuts a concave 🤔

Think about it from the blade's point of view.

My tool has a function that takes away the convex center of either the tip bottom or the ferrule top. This problem has crept up on me once in a while over the years, so I figured out a way to deal with it. It takes material out of only the center of the shaft or tip bottom. You can do it with a rounded rasp or something like that but be careful.


Jeff Livingston
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It creates a concave face because the cutting tool is not moving EXACTLEY 90 degrees to the face of the material.

There are a few things to look at.

First things first, find a way to at least get the headstock attached to the rest of the lathe, then try it again and see what happens.

Post up the results.
 

kgoods

Consistently Inconsistent
Gold Member
I thought I did too 😒

I understand why if it's not cutting a perfect 90 but just can't figure out how it cuts a concave 🤔
Also, try making a facing cut on something (plastic, wood, or aluminum if you have some) as large as your chuck will hold. This should make any misalignment of the headstock much easier to see. If you're seeing a concave face now you'll probably see more of a conical face in the larger material. This is also a good test for after you get the headstock dialed in.... it should be completely flat over the larger face. Once that is accomplished you're sure to have a completely flat surface on the smaller ferrule.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
1>Your cutting tool is not sharp. Without seeing your set up and the tools you are using, tool push off is the problem.
2>If the tool is sharp, what ever is holding the tool has slop in it and is causing the push off.
3> The alignment shouldn't matter for a flat cut. If the tool is sharp and you have no slop, chuck up piece of wood and intentionally cock it in the chuck and take a cut. Sharp tool and no slop should still equal a flat cut.
4> Refer to number 1 and number 2.
 

PracticeChampion

Well-known member
Also, try making a facing cut on something (plastic, wood, or aluminum if you have some) as large as your chuck will hold. This should make any misalignment of the headstock much easier to see. If you're seeing a concave face now you'll probably see more of a conical face in the larger material. This is also a good test for after you get the headstock dialed in.... it should be completely flat over the larger face. Once that is accomplished you're sure to have a completely flat surface on the smaller ferrule.
Great ideal
 

kgoods

Consistently Inconsistent
Gold Member
And follow Dave's advice and make sure your cutting tool is razor sharp. Good catch Dave! This is #1 and I tend to assume that everyone keeps a good edge on thier tools so I forget to think about this possibility.
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
I always face the last little bit with a razor blade. Using very light pressure once the ferrule is free of the old tip and glue. You will get a feel for the right speed and pressure with practice. It will come out nice and flat. A quick touch with 220 while it's spinning, clean the surface (never touch with hands) and it's ready.
 

conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'll get a picture but I use one of these that's mounted to a board minus that headstock and the head is mounted independent of it so there is definitely a possibility that something moved. I'll have to find my square to ensure again that its 90°. It still cuts to center good but will definitely check the 90 before going further.

Here's also a picture of the concave I was talking about, it's very little but I could see with hard plastic pad especially it being a problem
Looks to me that either the carriage is not locked/clamped so it can't move. Or, the carriage is locked in position, and the cross slide gib needs to be readjusted so it is not loose. Any slight movement can cause this. You do need sharp tools and it needs to be correctly adjusted to cut on the centreline, otherwise, it will leave a little bump in the centre. Check also that there is not the tight then loose feel of the cross slide feed wheel. If there is, it may have a bent feed screw. Another tip, is to use both hands on the cross slide feed wheel and not use the rapid wind handle. Try to turn the feed wheel by not introducing any sideways motion.
 

PracticeChampion

Well-known member
Looks to me that either the carriage is not locked/clamped so it can't move. Or, the carriage is locked in position, and the cross slide gib needs to be readjusted so it is not loose. Any slight movement can cause this. You do need sharp tools and it needs to be correctly adjusted to cut on the centreline, otherwise, it will leave a little bump in the centre. Check also that there is not the tight then loose feel of the cross slide feed wheel. If there is, it may have a bent feed screw. Another tip, is to use both hands on the cross slide feed wheel and not use the rapid wind handle. Try to turn the feed wheel by not introducing any sideways motion.
Yeah that carriage doesn't lock but I did tighten the tension down so it takes good force to move it.
One or the other did move and it wasn't cutting 90°. Hour worth of adjustments and sharpened bit again and it cut straight, tried 3 different squares to be sure lol. So far it's holding and even just feels solid on hit vrs the last tip.

I am going to find me a head that'll fit on the lathe to avoid this situation again
 

kgoods

Consistently Inconsistent
Gold Member
Yeah that carriage doesn't lock but I did tighten the tension down so it takes good force to move it.
One or the other did move and it wasn't cutting 90°. Hour worth of adjustments and sharpened bit again and it cut straight, tried 3 different squares to be sure lol. So far it's holding and even just feels solid on hit vrs the last tip.

I am going to find me a head that'll fit on the lathe to avoid this situation again
Glad you got it squared away. Hopefully that will solve you tip problems! Good luck!
 
Top