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Basic Aiming - My thoughts and approach - 12-03-2018, 10:55 AM

Like many of you I've played pool all of my life.

I was blessed with above average hand-eye coordination.

I took lessons from Jimmy Reid many years ago (if you're not familiar with Jimmy, he was a stone cold champion - 1985 US OPEN 9 Ball Champion, World 8 Ball Champion, etc, etc...).

Jimmy taught me the fundamentals needed to be a good shot maker. These aren't any secret...but at the time he showed these to me as a kid they were life changing.

1. Your stance should always be well balanced regardless of the shot. If you're balanced, after your tip makes contact with the cue ball you should be able to freeze completely in place (head/arm/stance/all) UNTIL the cue ball stops rolling. When you can do this consistently you will play way, way, better. And when you miss, you'll KNOW why you missed (overcut, undercut, etc).

Aiming is perception so everyone will ultimately develop or fine-tune their own methods (despite the various, wonderful techniques that can help you get started...I advocate trying them all), but if they can't stay still or get in-line...they'll never REALLY know why they miss or make a ball.

Here is how I aim. It's really basic, but it works.

1. I find the line between the cue ball and a 100% full hit on the object ball (regardless of where the object ball is in relation to the pocket). I need to see that full hit first.

2. Then I look at the object ball in relation to the pocket.

3. Looking at these two perceptions helps me find the contact point. I always had a tendency to overcut everything and when I figured this out, it really helped.

4. Shoot with good fundamentals and if you miss, your brain will interpret why and should kind of automatically adjust as you progress in your game for that day. You should get these adjustments out of the way during practice and before competition each day.

I hope this might help someone.


"I used to bet my own but it gave me ulcers." - John Schmidt, 2008
  
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12-03-2018, 11:22 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post
Here is how I aim. It's really basic, but it works.

1. I find the line between the cue ball and a 100% full hit on the object ball (regardless of where the object ball is in relation to the pocket). I need to see that full hit first.

2. Then I look at the object ball in relation to the pocket.

3. Looking at these two perceptions helps me find the contact point.
Do you do anything in particular with the contact point? For instance, I "measure" how far my stick is pointed from the contact point. I don't do anything consciously with that measurement, just take note and let my subconscious use it to tell me when the shot "looks right".

pj
chgo
  
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12-03-2018, 04:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post
Here is how I aim. It's really basic, but it works.

1. I find the line between the cue ball and a 100% full hit on the object ball (regardless of where the object ball is in relation to the pocket). I need to see that full hit first.

2. Then I look at the object ball in relation to the pocket.
That's exactly what I do. Don't exactly know why, but that straight in shot starts things off. I'd add that I probably only do this for longer shots, and not for sharp angles.


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12-03-2018, 04:48 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post


Here is how I aim. It's really basic, but it works.

1. I find the line between the cue ball and a 100% full hit on the object ball (regardless of where the object ball is in relation to the pocket). I need to see that full hit first.

2. Then I look at the object ball in relation to the pocket.

3. Looking at these two perceptions helps me find the contact point. I always had a tendency to overcut everything and when I figured this out, it really helped.

4. Shoot with good fundamentals and if you miss, your brain will interpret why and should kind of automatically adjust as you progress in your game for that day. You should get these adjustments out of the way during practice and before competition each day.

I hope this might help someone.

I never paid much attention to the full hit comparison until I started looking at fractional aiming. Now I see it as a great key to recognizing cut shots. Great helpful post!
  
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12-03-2018, 05:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post
3. Looking at these two perceptions helps me find the contact point. I always had a tendency to overcut everything and when I figured this out, it really helped.

I hope this might help someone.
Thanks for your post. I am so surprised that you "overcut" everything! When I'm in a daze or not concentrating, I undercut everything. And, that is what my pool teacher says most misses are from. It usually boils down that the pocket is not really the pocket along the rails, etc. It could be 4" outside of the actual pocket with the middle of the rail ends. I think most amateurs "undercut" almost everything thinking the pocket is the pocket. Thinking that what they see as the deep dark end of the pocket is the goal to send the OB. Maybe just my mistake.


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12-04-2018, 03:19 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post
Like many of you I've played pool all of my life.

I was blessed with above average hand-eye coordination.

I took lessons from Jimmy Reid many years ago (if you're not familiar with Jimmy, he was a stone cold champion - 1985 US OPEN 9 Ball Champion, World 8 Ball Champion, etc, etc...).

Jimmy taught me the fundamentals needed to be a good shot maker. These aren't any secret...but at the time he showed these to me as a kid they were life changing.

1. Your stance should always be well balanced regardless of the shot. If you're balanced, after your tip makes contact with the cue ball you should be able to freeze completely in place (head/arm/stance/all) UNTIL the cue ball stops rolling. When you can do this consistently you will play way, way, better. And when you miss, you'll KNOW why you missed (overcut, undercut, etc).

Aiming is perception so everyone will ultimately develop or fine-tune their own methods (despite the various, wonderful techniques that can help you get started...I advocate trying them all), but if they can't stay still or get in-line...they'll never REALLY know why they miss or make a ball.

Here is how I aim. It's really basic, but it works.

1. I find the line between the cue ball and a 100% full hit on the object ball (regardless of where the object ball is in relation to the pocket). I need to see that full hit first.

2. Then I look at the object ball in relation to the pocket.

3. Looking at these two perceptions helps me find the contact point. I always had a tendency to overcut everything and when I figured this out, it really helped.

4. Shoot with good fundamentals and if you miss, your brain will interpret why and should kind of automatically adjust as you progress in your game for that day. You should get these adjustments out of the way during practice and before competition each day.

I hope this might help someone.
This is also what I do ever since I saw Jimmy Reid's "No Time for Negative" VHS tape back in the mid 90's or there about.

John


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12-04-2018, 06:34 AM

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Originally Posted by BC21 View Post
I never paid much attention to the full hit comparison until I started looking at fractional aiming. Now I see it as a great key to recognizing cut shots. Great helpful post!
See Section 2, this article: https://www.thoughtco.com/aim-primer...ll-line-367991


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12-04-2018, 06:40 AM

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Originally Posted by denwhit View Post
Thanks for your post. I am so surprised that you "overcut" everything! When I'm in a daze or not concentrating, I undercut everything. And, that is what my pool teacher says most misses are from. It usually boils down that the pocket is not really the pocket along the rails, etc. It could be 4" outside of the actual pocket with the middle of the rail ends. I think most amateurs "undercut" almost everything thinking the pocket is the pocket. Thinking that what they see as the deep dark end of the pocket is the goal to send the OB. Maybe just my mistake.
Stronger players tend to be undercutters IMO. Most league players overcut, driving corner cuts into the long rails, not the short rails.

Reasons for overcutting from weaker players include:

* Overcutting past the geometric aim point can help counteract throw, so they overcut subconciously, don't get throw, miss

* Aiming/aligning the body on the perceived geometric aim line, where the full line is easier to hit full upon, by contrast

* Hitting the ball too hard (subconciously, perhaps, attempting to account for throw again) and squirting/deflecting off line/jumping the ball, etc.

* Having been "taught" (often by "knowledgeable" pool friends rather than instructors) that certain cuts are best when we "aim to miss then come back a bit"

* Ghost ball aim players often overcut, their emphasis is on "missing" rather than edge-to-edge or something solid


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Instruction Staff, InsidePool Magazine
Author, Book & DVD, Picture Yourself Shooting Pool (Named to the 25 Best Billiards Books of All Time by Bookauthority)
  
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12-04-2018, 10:22 AM

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Originally Posted by Patrick Johnson View Post
Do you do anything in particular with the contact point? For instance, I "measure" how far my stick is pointed from the contact point. I don't do anything consciously with that measurement, just take note and let my subconscious use it to tell me when the shot "looks right".

pj
chgo

I don't even think of it as a "point". I think of it as a "face"...almost as if the ball is a cube. It psychologically gives me a much bigger target. Don't know if it makes sense for others, but works for me. Of course, when I'm in stroke I don't have it to give it much thought. I've been playing for so long it doesn't take as long to get my aiming in tune.


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12-04-2018, 10:25 AM

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Originally Posted by Dan White View Post
That's exactly what I do. Don't exactly know why, but that straight in shot starts things off. I'd add that I probably only do this for longer shots, and not for sharp angles.
That's a great observation, Dan. This is really how I came up with it - when working on long shots. I mean, I'm sure I'm not the "inventor"...it's nothing revolutionary. But, discovered it for myself.


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12-04-2018, 10:28 AM

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Originally Posted by denwhit View Post
Thanks for your post. I am so surprised that you "overcut" everything! When I'm in a daze or not concentrating, I undercut everything. And, that is what my pool teacher says most misses are from. It usually boils down that the pocket is not really the pocket along the rails, etc. It could be 4" outside of the actual pocket with the middle of the rail ends. I think most amateurs "undercut" almost everything thinking the pocket is the pocket. Thinking that what they see as the deep dark end of the pocket is the goal to send the OB. Maybe just my mistake.
Yeah, when I started out I had a tendency to overcut.

To add to my technique...I will also walk to the object ball and look at it compared to the pocket. THEN I will go and find the full ball hit, etc, etc. Sometimes I might even imagine or visualize the ball rolling into the pocket. All of these little visuals help you perceive where to hit it. Do whatever techniques you need BEFORE getting down on the ball. By the time you get down on the ball you should be 100% confident on where you are aiming. Then if your fundamentals are good and you miss, you'll know why and can adjust.


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12-04-2018, 10:31 AM

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Originally Posted by One Pocket John View Post
This is also what I do ever since I saw Jimmy Reid's "No Time for Negative" VHS tape back in the mid 90's or there about.

John
I went to Jimmy's house when he lived in Nashville....early 2000s. He was a nice guy, great player, and great teacher. If I had gone and ONLY learned the stance/stability practice technique it would have been worth it's weight in gold. I hope people realize how valuable that is.


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12-04-2018, 10:38 AM

[QUOTE=BilliardsAbout;6278774]Stronger players tend to be undercutters IMO. Most league players overcut, driving corner cuts into the long rails, not the short rails.
Reasons for overcutting from weaker players include:
* Overcutting past the geometric aim point can help counteract throw, so they overcut subconciously, don't get throw, miss
* Aiming/aligning the body on the perceived geometric aim line, where the full line is easier to hit full upon, by contrast
* Hitting the ball too hard (subconciously, perhaps, attempting to account for throw again) and squirting/deflecting off line/jumping the ball, etc.
* Having been "taught" (often by "knowledgeable" pool friends rather than instructors) that certain cuts are best when we "aim to miss then come back a bit"
* Ghost ball aim players often overcut, their emphasis is on "missing" rather than edge-to-edge or something solid[/QUOTE]<===I've never seen a "ghost" yet.
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NOW.......you're sounding like a pool player!
That's good stuff.
WTG.


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12-04-2018, 11:44 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_24 View Post
I don't even think of it as a "point". I think of it as a "face"...almost as if the ball is a cube. It psychologically gives me a much bigger target. Don't know if it makes sense for others, but works for me. Of course, when I'm in stroke I don't have it to give it much thought. I've been playing for so long it doesn't take as long to get my aiming in tune.
Sounds similar to visualizing the tangent line as an aiming guide. I've heard of that, and have even noticed myself doing something similar on occasion.

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chgo
  
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Smile 12-05-2018, 05:59 AM

[QUOTE=Low500;6278995]
Quote:
Originally Posted by BilliardsAbout View Post
Stronger players tend to be undercutters IMO. Most league players overcut, driving corner cuts into the long rails, not the short rails.
Reasons for overcutting from weaker players include:
* Overcutting past the geometric aim point can help counteract throw, so they overcut subconciously, don't get throw, miss
* Aiming/aligning the body on the perceived geometric aim line, where the full line is easier to hit full upon, by contrast
* Hitting the ball too hard (subconciously, perhaps, attempting to account for throw again) and squirting/deflecting off line/jumping the ball, etc.
* Having been "taught" (often by "knowledgeable" pool friends rather than instructors) that certain cuts are best when we "aim to miss then come back a bit"
* Ghost ball aim players often overcut, their emphasis is on "missing" rather than edge-to-edge or something solid[/QUOTE]<===I've never seen a "ghost" yet.
Attachment 506780
NOW.......you're sounding like a pool player!
That's good stuff.
WTG.


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