Preshot routine
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Preshot routine - 12-05-2017, 03:54 PM

Like a lot of people I struggle some with my pre-shot routine, after stepping into the shot.

1. Scott Lee taught me to try to do the same thing each time to train my sub conscious what to expect. I tried 2 strokes aim pause then shoot for quite a while. I never mastered it and found myself thinking more about counting how many stokes I did than aiming. I have a friend I shared this idea with who started with 5 practice and ended up settling on two and does it religiously and it has helped his game. He is probably more trainable then I am.

2. Jerry Briesath talks about evaluating and when everything looks good say "looks good - shoot" or something like that. If it doesn't look good re-do. He does not mention a specific number of practice strokes. He also emphasizes a slow take back on the final stroke. I think almost all the instructors agree with that part.

3. CJ Wiley compares it to a basketball player shooting a free throw. He doesn't take a series of full extensions, he takes several short aiming shots, gets the feel for it then takes a final full slow take back and shoots.

I have tried all of these and find I do best when I don't think much about the first part and just work on relaxing. Sometimes no practice strokes others a few short ones and for some shots a long stroke or two. It depends a lot on how I plan to hit the ball. If I know I have to extend through and take a long stroke for speed or draw, etc. I almost have to take a couple full length strokes. For shots where aim is critical but not speed I like the short strokes for aiming. What I have settled on is a slow take back and getting very stable on my final stoke then a mid to long pause. I feel the nervous energy drain while I pause and get the Jerry Briesath feeling of "it looks good" and my game has picked up substantially in the last week after settling on this routine.

I would be curious what other instructors teach and other players find works best for them.
  
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12-05-2017, 04:35 PM

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Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Like a lot of people I struggle some with my pre-shot routine, after stepping into the shot.

1. Scott Lee taught me to try to do the same thing each time to train my sub conscious what to expect. I tried 2 strokes aim pause then shoot for quite a while. I never mastered it and found myself thinking more about counting how many stokes I did than aiming. I have a friend I shared this idea with who started with 5 practice and ended up settling on two and does it religiously and it has helped his game. He is probably more trainable then I am.

2. Jerry Briesath talks about evaluating and when everything looks good say "looks good - shoot" or something like that. If it doesn't look good re-do. He does not mention a specific number of practice strokes. He also emphasizes a slow take back on the final stroke. I think almost all the instructors agree with that part.

3. CJ Wiley compares it to a basketball player shooting a free throw. He doesn't take a series of full extensions, he takes several short aiming shots, gets the feel for it then takes a final full slow take back and shoots.

I have tried all of these and find I do best when I don't think much about the first part and just work on relaxing. Sometimes no practice strokes others a few short ones and for some shots a long stroke or two. It depends a lot on how I plan to hit the ball. If I know I have to extend through and take a long stroke for speed or draw, etc. I almost have to take a couple full length strokes. For shots where aim is critical but not speed I like the short strokes for aiming. What I have settled on is a slow take back and getting very stable on my final stoke then a mid to long pause. I feel the nervous energy drain while I pause and get the Jerry Briesath feeling of "it looks good" and my game has picked up substantially in the last week after settling on this routine.

I would be curious what other instructors teach and other players find works best for them.
The first thing I do is try to figure out my position 2 or 3 balls in the future. Then I aim, step into the shot, take two practice strokes and shoot on the third stroke. I try very hard to keep focused on my aiming spot and never see the ball go into the pocket. Correct or not, it seems to work for me.


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12-05-2017, 05:31 PM

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Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Like a lot of people I struggle some with my pre-shot routine, after stepping into the shot.

1. Scott Lee taught me to try to do the same thing each time to train my sub conscious what to expect. I tried 2 strokes aim pause then shoot for quite a while. I never mastered it and found myself thinking more about counting how many stokes I did than aiming. I have a friend I shared this idea with who started with 5 practice and ended up settling on two and does it religiously and it has helped his game. He is probably more trainable then I am.

2. Jerry Briesath talks about evaluating and when everything looks good say "looks good - shoot" or something like that. If it doesn't look good re-do. He does not mention a specific number of practice strokes. He also emphasizes a slow take back on the final stroke. I think almost all the instructors agree with that part.

3. CJ Wiley compares it to a basketball player shooting a free throw. He doesn't take a series of full extensions, he takes several short aiming shots, gets the feel for it then takes a final full slow take back and shoots.

I have tried all of these and find I do best when I don't think much about the first part and just work on relaxing. Sometimes no practice strokes others a few short ones and for some shots a long stroke or two. It depends a lot on how I plan to hit the ball. If I know I have to extend through and take a long stroke for speed or draw, etc. I almost have to take a couple full length strokes. For shots where aim is critical but not speed I like the short strokes for aiming. What I have settled on is a slow take back and getting very stable on my final stoke then a mid to long pause. I feel the nervous energy drain while I pause and get the Jerry Briesath feeling of "it looks good" and my game has picked up substantially in the last week after settling on this routine.

I would be curious what other instructors teach and other players find works best for them.
Hey Ship.

I'm posting several videos in sequence for your review. Hope these help ya out.

The only thing I would add to this video is once you see the straight line walk up to the butt of the cue so that you can see where it is pointed on your body keeping the shot straight in line as you see it. This will always be the starting point of your grip hand forever on the shot line as you see it. You build your stance around your grip hand. (it's already on the shot line)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKoMZrg1MAg

Then do this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDkP...9F913F&index=4

Once you practice the above you will want to master this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuaNdCU64R4

Then this one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5QrJGUocAo

Then this on. Watch all three parts.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGUIlp1q44Q

Then watch Alex Pagulayan. If you want to improve copy from the best all around player in the world. Watch his practice strokes, he is feeling the shot and not counting how many practice strokes he is taking. Everyone has their own rhythm on practice strokes yours will be different from others as mine is.

The elbow is a hinge get it on the shot line naturally and you'll really strat to enjoy the game. Your grip on the cue will allow for the elbow to close naturally.

One thing I will add is to learn to push the cue ball as Alex does. Feel in your grip hand that you are pushing the cue ball and not hitting the cue ball. There is a big difference. Feel the push in your grip hand.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZYaTo4WdR0

Hope all of this helps ya. You asked other players help so here it is.

Have fun.

John


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Last edited by One Pocket John; 12-05-2017 at 06:14 PM.
  
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12-05-2017, 06:43 PM

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Originally Posted by One Pocket John View Post
Hey Ship.

I'm posting several videos in sequence for your review. Hope these help ya out.

The only thing I would add to this video is once you see the straight line walk up to the butt of the cue so that you can see where it is pointed on your body keeping the shot straight in line as you see it. This will always be the starting point of your grip hand forever on the shot line as you see it. You build your stance around your grip hand. (it's already on the shot line)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKoMZrg1MAg

Then do this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDkP...9F913F&index=4

Once you practice the above you will want to master this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuaNdCU64R4

Then this one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5QrJGUocAo

Then this on. Watch all three parts.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGUIlp1q44Q

Then watch Alex Pagulayan. If you want to improve copy from the best all around player in the world. Watch his practice strokes, he is feeling the shot and not counting how many practice strokes he is taking. Everyone has their own rhythm on practice strokes yours will be different from others as mine is.

The elbow is a hinge get it on the shot line naturally and you'll really strat to enjoy the game. Your grip on the cue will allow for the elbow to close naturally.

One thing I will add is to learn to push the cue ball as Alex does. Feel in your grip hand that you are pushing the cue ball and not hitting the cue ball. There is a big difference. Feel the push in your grip hand.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZYaTo4WdR0

Hope all of this helps ya. You asked other players help so here it is.

Have fun.

John
I loved the videos and learned a lot from them. None specifically addressed any particular preshot practice stroke routine however. They literally covered everything else.

After stepping into the shot; always take the same exact number of practice strokes? take full strokes or partial? some of each depending? long pause or short pause? or continuous back, transition then forward with minimal pause.

I have a friend who does about 20 practice strokes. I can do things he can't and understand the game better but we play even. The reason is he knows exactly what he can and can not do and rarely ever misses a shot he is capable of. It is crazy waiting for him to shoot but it works for him. He just takes a LONG time to get comfortable.
  
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12-05-2017, 06:53 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
I loved the videos and learned a lot from them. None specifically addressed any particular preshot practice stroke routine however. They literally covered everything else.

After stepping into the shot; always take the same exact number of practice strokes? take full strokes or partial? some of each depending? long pause or short pause? or continuous back, transition then forward with minimal pause.

I have a friend who does about 20 practice strokes. I can do things he can't and understand the game better but we play even. The reason is he knows exactly what he can and can not do and rarely ever misses a shot he is capable of. It is crazy waiting for him to shoot but it works for him. He just takes a LONG time to get comfortable.


Skip. It's about feel for the shot. Maybe your friend needs 20Practice strokes before
Shooting that's his rhythm not yours. Your rhythm is unique to you and
Not what someone says it should be. The really important thing to
Remember is to pay more attention to the set position. Take longer at the set position.
John


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


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I don't play One Pocket as much as I use to, but when I do, I play at Cue & Cushion - Overland, MO.

In Memory of Dean Higgs and Harry Sims - gone but not forgotten and thank you.

Last edited by One Pocket John; 12-06-2017 at 03:23 AM.
  
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12-05-2017, 08:41 PM

A player's pre shot routine depends on the type of player they are. For example, mechanical type players will favor a certain number of practice strokes and will be more regimented in how they approach the table.

A feel player will take as many practice strokes they feel they need for a given shot, usually until things feel right. So things will change from shot to shot. Also, the feel player will be more instinctive-like (although humans don't really have instincts, but for lack of a better term) with their approach and aim.

When watching someone on Youtube, make sure you understand whether or not that player is more mechanical or instinctive. You can learn things from both types of players, regardless of how you play, but you may find yourself having more of a hard time trying to adapt to a style that may not suit you.


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12-05-2017, 09:12 PM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
A player's pre shot routine depends on the type of player they are. For example, mechanical type players will favor a certain number of practice strokes and will be more regimented in how they approach the table.

A feel player will take as many practice strokes they feel they need for a given shot, usually until things feel right. So things will change from shot to shot. Also, the feel player will be more instinctive-like (although humans don't really have instincts, but for lack of a better term) with their approach and aim.

When watching someone on Youtube, make sure you understand whether or not that player is more mechanical or instinctive. You can learn things from both types of players, regardless of how you play, but you may find yourself having more of a hard time trying to adapt to a style that may not suit you.
I like this post, a lot.

I played a guy once that took thirty to forty practice strokes on every shot. It was such slow play that I found myself counting his practice strokes! Don't be that guy.

My practice strokes vary based on what I'm trying to visualize. Just like when I play golf... sometimes, when out in the middle of the fairway and no particular goal other than a straight and long shot, I just step up and hit the ball. But if I'm playing a chip and run with an 8 or 9 iron, I may take several little practice swings, visualizing the exact trajectory and feel for the shot.


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12-05-2017, 10:06 PM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
A player's pre shot routine depends on the type of player they are. For example, mechanical type players will favor a certain number of practice strokes and will be more regimented in how they approach the table.

A feel player will take as many practice strokes they feel they need for a given shot, usually until things feel right. So things will change from shot to shot. Also, the feel player will be more instinctive-like (although humans don't really have instincts, but for lack of a better term) with their approach and aim.

When watching someone on Youtube, make sure you understand whether or not that player is more mechanical or instinctive. You can learn things from both types of players, regardless of how you play, but you may find yourself having more of a hard time trying to adapt to a style that may not suit you.
I am a very logical player but play best when I can turn that off while actually shooting. I do all my thinking before I step into the shot. Then I try to tune it all out. I don't want to think about where my team is in the match, what other choices I could have made, what other players are saying in the back ground. I just want to focus, relax and make the ball with the speed I planned on. I really get the value in Scott Lee's process of always doing a repeatable series but I got too literal and found myself going ONE TWO and then I was compelled to shoot, ready or not. Now I don't think about it and may not take any practice strokes, just extend the cue to the cue ball, pause to sight the shot in, draw back slowly and shoot. Other times It is 2-3 long strokes and others it is a few tentative little tap strokes then the slow take back, pause and shoot.

I appreciate your comments. Thank you.
  
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12-05-2017, 10:08 PM

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Originally Posted by BC21 View Post
I like this post, a lot.

I played a guy once that took thirty to forty practice strokes on every shot. It was such slow play that I found myself counting his practice strokes! Don't be that guy.

My practice strokes vary based on what I'm trying to visualize. Just like when I play golf... sometimes, when out in the middle of the fairway and no particular goal other than a straight and long shot, I just step up and hit the ball. But if I'm playing a chip and run with an 8 or 9 iron, I may take several little practice swings, visualizing the exact trajectory and feel for the shot.
I believe Jack Nicklaus said he didn't take a practice swing on full shots as he knew how to hit a full swing. Like you, he took practice swings to get the feel of pitch and chip shots because each one was different.

Good advice.
  
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12-05-2017, 10:10 PM

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Originally Posted by One Pocket John View Post
Skip. It's about feel for the shot. Maybe your friend needs 20
Practice strokes before
Shooting that's his rhythm not yours. Your rhythm is unique to you and
Not what someone says it should be. The really important thing to
Remember is to pay more attention to the set position. Take longer at the set position.
John


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks John.
  
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12-06-2017, 06:45 PM

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Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Thanks John.
Watch Alex. It is not he amount of how far you bring the cue back. Its how far you deliver the cue forward that gets the job done.
The amount of practice strokes is what I like to call "measuring the shot" for speed and force going forward. Your practice strokes will happen automatically, Like Jerry B says "when it looks good and feels good "shoot"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ileKS7-WQDI&t=307s

Over and Out. Have fun.

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12-16-2017, 08:32 AM

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Originally Posted by Jonbouy View Post
The first thing I do is try to figure out my position 2 or 3 balls in the future. Then I aim, step into the shot, take two practice strokes and shoot on the third stroke. I try very hard to keep focused on my aiming spot and never see the ball go into the pocket. Correct or not, it seems to work for me.
That is what Scott teaches and I believe is a great approach. It is not a matter of 2 strokes or 5, it is always doing the same thing. I was surprised to find I could not actually master that.
  
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12-16-2017, 08:35 AM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
A player's pre shot routine depends on the type of player they are. For example, mechanical type players will favor a certain number of practice strokes and will be more regimented in how they approach the table.

A feel player will take as many practice strokes they feel they need for a given shot, usually until things feel right. So things will change from shot to shot. Also, the feel player will be more instinctive-like (although humans don't really have instincts, but for lack of a better term) with their approach and aim.

When watching someone on Youtube, make sure you understand whether or not that player is more mechanical or instinctive. You can learn things from both types of players, regardless of how you play, but you may find yourself having more of a hard time trying to adapt to a style that may not suit you.
Great analysis. I play best when I am in the feel mode. I would not consider myself a feel player but must be. When I engage my conscious mind and "think too much" I play poorly. "Study long study wrong."
  
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12-16-2017, 04:49 PM

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Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Great analysis. I play best when I am in the feel mode. I would not consider myself a feel player but must be. When I engage my conscious mind and "think too much" I play poorly. "Study long study wrong."
Yes I have noticed my tournament wins came with a lot of "feel" of every shot. There is no overthinking, there is just the feeling of how right the shot is going to be. The elusive "zone" i guess
  
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12-17-2017, 01:05 PM

Skip...I have always been a "feel" player. That, however, is not something you can teach someone...they have to come to their own conclusions about what "feel" means to them...as it may not be the same for everyone. That said, like Knels mentioned, being in "the zone" or "deadstroke" is probably the most sought after ability a poolplayer can strive for. Anyone who has ever run a rack of pool has experienced deadstroke...even if just for a few shots. What we can control, and deliver under pressure, is a physical and mental routine to accurately set up and deliver the cuestick. Something must be trained physically (consciously), before it can enter the subconscious level of application. This is the real reason why doing the same thing the same way on every shot is the quickest way to see solid improvement, like your friend did. What we are really doing, is creating opportunities for us to fall into deadstroke more frequently (and hopefully for a longer time) Are you less trainable? I doubt it. What you are (imo) is unsure of something about what you do...maybe your stroke, maybe your aim, maybe something else...which is why you continue to seek the "holy grail"...whatever that is. While, in the end, it is different strokes for different folks...simpler is better. KISS rules!

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Great analysis. I play best when I am in the feel mode. I would not consider myself a feel player but must be. When I engage my conscious mind and "think too much" I play poorly. "Study long study wrong."


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