Ball Polisher

Call_me_Tom

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’ve not been impressed with the DIY polishers. The buffers used aren’t that great, combined with near zero airflow within the bucket the DIY polishers burnout quick.
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unless you do what I did....

I cut breathing holes in the bucket.
Also I cut small round holes in the bucket for the corners of the buffer handles to stick through. Holds the buffer in place and can be easily removed.

The buffer still gets pretty warm, but it takes a while. My next design will have a small fan in one of the holes.
 

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arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
One highly significant (and unique) superiority of the Diamond ball cleaning/polishing machine that we use, is its patented "spiraling" capability. While the balls are obviously rotating around a nominally horizontal plane, the effect of this additional spiraling feature is that every square millimeter of the ball's exterior surface is contacted by the cleaning elements many times throughout the cycle.

Think of it as the 100% coverage of points anywhere on the Earth's surface by a hypothetical satellite rotating on infinitely variable orbital planes.

Arnaldo
 

fastone371

Certifiable
Silver Member
For my standards, my bucket polisher works great.

I'd hand polish before I spent $500.

I would never hand polish my pool balls again, I bought a Diamond polisher. With 3 sets of high end balls its well worth it and they look like they are brand new out of the box every time I use them.
 

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Is the 'spiraling' capability really patented? I searched USPO and couldn't find it.


One highly significant (and unique) superiority of the Diamond ball cleaning/polishing machine that we use, is its patented "spiraling" capability. While the balls are obviously rotating around a nominally horizontal plane, the effect of this additional spiraling feature is that every square millimeter of the ball's exterior surface is contacted by the cleaning elements many times throughout the cycle.

Think of it as the 100% coverage of points anywhere on the Earth's surface by a hypothetical satellite rotating on infinitely variable orbital planes.

Arnaldo
 

JusticeNJ

Four Points/Steel Joints
Silver Member
I've got a Ballstar and its great. I couldn't find a Diamond readily for sale. The poolhall I used to work at had the Bloodworth one and I prefer the Ballstar and the Diamond over that one by far. I'd make my own before buying the Bloodworth IMO.
 

Mick

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I really like the design of the diamond polisher. I think I'll rip it off when I build another one. Can probably do it for $150 if I keep my eyes open for a good 2nd hand motor.
 

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I really like the design of the diamond polisher. I think I'll rip it off when I build another one. Can probably do it for $150 if I keep my eyes open for a good 2nd hand motor.

Here's a design that improves on the 16-ball Diamond machine...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9V_-YoJRnas

It has an offset platter that imparts 'spin & tumble' to the balls. Works really good but a real pain to build with just basic woodworking equipment. A large CNC machine would be nice. Strictly parts/materials is a bit under $200, labor is free if you like building stuff with close tolerances.

Yes, I've launched some balls out of some experimental versions, that's why I don't like the revolving platter idea too much (whipping 6 lbs of hard balls around in a circle).
 

Mick

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I really like that one too, but think I want to keep an 8 ball setup, storage space is at a premium.

This is my current one I'm using, but it's getting a bit long in the tooth, I built it awhile ago and probably has over 200 cycles on it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdWtVb2nlsE
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Here's a design that improves on the 16-ball Diamond machine...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9V_-YoJRnas

It has an offset platter that imparts 'spin & tumble' to the balls. Works really good but a real pain to build with just basic woodworking equipment. A large CNC machine would be nice. Strictly parts/materials is a bit under $200, labor is free if you like building stuff with close tolerances.

Yes, I've launched some balls out of some experimental versions, that's why I don't like the revolving platter idea too much (whipping 6 lbs of hard balls around in a circle).

That's a nice design. Is it your design? I wonder if an industrial sewing machine ebay special motor would work fine for it. You might be able to reduce the height if its shorter than the motor you used.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Genuin...481363&hash=item23513dac2c:g:mLoAAOSwl8VcrsIV
 

Mick

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was thinking a cheap drill press would have all the basic parts you'd need, with very little needing modification.
 

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was thinking a cheap drill press would have all the basic parts you'd need, with very little needing modification.

The little Harbor Freight $59 (on sale) drill press claims to be 1/3 HP and looks perfect for a ball cleaner. Chances of burning it out in a couple hours are likely pretty high.
 

Geosnooker

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dishwasher, a touch of detergent, vinegar. Come out clean and sparkling.

The key is literally a drop of detergent.

(same with glassware, make your wife happy...sparkle, sparkle...sparkle.).
 
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