Benefits of joining an APA league?

BD23

New member
I just want to play and improve, not interested in "meeting" new friends. Can anyone explain their reasons for joining.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Exposing new players to the sport can only be a good thing. I constantly hear people lament how the sport is dying out. Well you can't have it both ways. What's the point of being elite if the player pool shrinks to nothing? New blood means more money to bars, manufacturers and the sport in general. I no longer play APA but I would if my sons decided to put together a team and needed some guidance. I do play with the local APA League operator who is a great guy but we play an in house BCA league. I personally can't handle the length of a match that starts at 7PM but I am getting older and I still have to get up to work.
If mini-golf makes a comeback. 400k people playing. What's that do for the PGA?
Diddly squat.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pro

Pool for US players is in the gutter still...no change.

Same as league mentality, we sold US pro pool for peanuts looking for a quick fix. Now there's a huge influx of foreign talent and we can't field more than 3 that can compete.

How does getting your buddy who never hit a ball or your housewife improve the level of pool in the US? People need to start young and be in an environment that breeds players. The APA and other national leagues are in it for the money.
Have you ever played in the APA?
 

cjl0s

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
If mini-golf makes a comeback. 400k people playing. What's that do for the PGA?
Diddly squat.
My local bar has about 20 well maintained diamond tables. This place would not exist if there weren't APA leagues running 5 times a week. I enjoy it as well as the big table halls. Your point is well taken that it is not going to produce a lot of champions and maybe that ship has sailed. American kids would rather play video games and tik tock. That is not the league's fault.

I know who you are and you are an excellent player and an owner over a very long time. And I enjoy your insights. I wish also the sport in US flourished more. But running down people that are new to the sport serves no one. I have seen people (one person in particular) rise up from the ranks in APA to approach a 700 Fargo rating. Not typical but it happens. If they didn't start in leagues they may have never played.
 

WoodyJ

Sacred Cow=Best Hamburger
Gold Member
Silver Member
I attempted to play APA again after stopping in 2004. At that time I was an 8 in nine ball and a 6 in eight ball.

Not one team was interested in me because my rank was too high.

So I contacted everyone from the local APA all the way to the national headquarters to have my rank adjusted lower based on age and medical issues. I am now 71and have benign essential tremors in my hands.

They all refused and said I should just join a team and my handicap would be reflected in my results.

Nonetheless no team will take me based on the rank from 2004. I am considering TAP but honestly losing interest in any league at this point and playing less pool all the time now.

I've never played APA and this sounds like why I wouldn't want to.

Do you have a table at home? If so, what I do is find other people in the area (through league members, tournaments, ...). Invite people you like to play at home.

My friends and I now regularly play one day a week and rotate houses each week. Been doing this for over a decade now. And, my new league team is now starting to get together for team practices the same way since we all own tables.

Sounds like you just need to figure out how to have fun while playing.
 
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tim913

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think the leagues help the lower handicapped players cause you’re always playing someone at or above your skill level. The better players should find a masters or similar league or else you’re always matched against someone who just needs a couple of games to beat you and that really isn’t doing anything for your game
 

nicksaint26

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
According to SBC we should all be gambling with people way better than us to enrich them for playing pool 24/7 their whole lives. That way they don't feel like they wasted their life in the pool room. If you have a real job and don't have a lot of time to get better you should just quit and not join a league. Nobody should play pool for fun according to him.

The guy owns a pool room, probably practices more than anyone and still ain't a pro. That should tell you all you need to know about him and his talents. Yet he still knocks anyone who won't gamble way above their head because they actually work for a living and play pool as a hobby.
 
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dardusm

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pro

Pool for US players is in the gutter still...no change.

Same as league mentality, we sold US pro pool for peanuts looking for a quick fix. Now there's a huge influx of foreign talent and we can't field more than 3 that can compete.

How does getting your buddy who never hit a ball or your housewife improve the level of pool in the US? People need to start young and be in an environment that breeds players. The APA and other national leagues are in it for the money.
Getting your buddy or housewife in a league creates money for the industry. It also can create fans of the sport. Which in turn creates numbers for the product "professional pool" which can be sold to other sponsorships outside the industry. I'm not an APA fanboy but they are doing some things to make the US players more competitive by offering junior leagues and competition. There are others that are fueling the juniors which will in turn will grow the talent pool and in turn close the gap between the US, Asian and European players. It needs to be treated as a sport rather than a past time.

It takes time. I don't have kids but If I did, 15 years ago I wouldn't let them near a pool table. The current paradigm in pool would make me rethink that stance.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
According to SBC we should all be gambling with people way better than us to enrich them for playing pool 24/7 their whole lives. That way they don't feel like they wasted their life in the pool room. If you have a real job and don't have a lot of time to get better you should just quit and not join a league. Nobody should play pool for fun according to him.

The guy owns a pool room, probably practices more than anyone and still ain't a pro. That should tell you all you need to know about him and his talents. Yet he still knocks anyone who won't gamble way above their head because they actually work for a living and play pool as a hobby.
Who does have a real job.

We can bet W2s. I'll spot you 40k.
 

jtompilot

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just want to play and improve, not interested in "meeting" new friends. Can anyone explain their reasons for joining.
I quit the APA. What a pile of garbage league along with ample doses of frustration. There are much better ways of improving. I’ll admit your results may vary.
 

justadub

Rattling corners nightly
Silver Member
APA isn't for everyone, and thats ok. It is good for a couple hundred thousand folks tho, so that's not all bad. There are many rooms that wouldn't be able to survive without league and it's players, so that's not bad. Those housewives and beginners and such buy far more gear and gadgets, so that's not a bad thing. And they usually buy food and drinks, also not a bad thing.

Will APA create the next great pro, probably not. But pool rooms that continue to remain open because of league players might just help that aspiring pro. I've played with several people in APA here who have gone on to other leagues and regional tournaments, it's fun keeping up with how they're doing.

To the OP, maybe you ought to go spend a little time on league night, and see for yourself. Maybe you'll like it, maybe you won't. Maybe you are better suited for weekend tournaments. That's cool, too.
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pro

Pool for US players is in the gutter still...no change.

Same as league mentality, we sold US pro pool for peanuts looking for a quick fix. Now there's a huge influx of foreign talent and we can't field more than 3 that can compete.

How does getting your buddy who never hit a ball or your housewife improve the level of pool in the US? People need to start young and be in an environment that breeds players. The APA and other national leagues are in it for the money.

I can't think of a single good player in the US come out from the league "system". It's not there for that, but they do help a lot with equipment sales which does indirectly help pro players with sponsorship money.
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I attempted to play APA again after stopping in 2004. At that time I was an 8 in nine ball and a 6 in eight ball.

Not one team was interested in me because my rank was too high.

So I contacted everyone from the local APA all the way to the national headquarters to have my rank adjusted lower based on age and medical issues. I am now 71and have benign essential tremors in my hands.

They all refused and said I should just join a team and my handicap would be reflected in my results.

Nonetheless no team will take me based on the rank from 2004. I am considering TAP but honestly losing interest in any league at this point and playing less pool all the time now.

Why not start your own team then if you can't find a existing one to join?
 

Justaneng

Registered
For the OP. If your primary goal is to improve, APA is the lowest rung of players in the league systems (by design), but they are also the most prominent so depending on your specifics (days available, location, etc..) it may be your best option. If your current skillset is around an APA SL-5 or lower, then you'll be able to find good competition within the league and play a wide variety of players. It can be a bit innefficient time wise though, as you'll spend 1 hour shooting and the rest either scoring or waiting unless you can play in a room with some spare tables for practice.
 

mattb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I played it for years but I did so because I liked to teach and help the lower players on my team. But APA in itself is a terrible program with garbage rules, payouts, tournaments and travel expenses.

If you aren't into meeting people and having some social interaction, then as said maybe do a Masters league or just stick to practice and tournaments. Doesn't sound like APA is for you.
 

Rickhem

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just want to play and improve, not interested in "meeting" new friends. Can anyone explain their reasons for joining.

If you are a fairly competent bar player, APA will make you better. You'll be playing (or watching) people with skill sets different than yours, and if you pay attention, you can learn from that. You can do that by watching YouTube or live streams, but being actually in the match is different. And you'll lose to people that do something you didn't expect, and you can learn from that. You'll screw up safety shots that require a level of touch that you may not have yet, and you'll work on that and any of the other things that pop up highlighting an aspect of your game that needs some work. You may get on a team with someone that can help identify those things and help make you better, and he doesn't have to become your new best buddy. You'll figure out pretty quickly who is there to play and who is there to pad innings and keep their handicap low, but that doesn't mean you can't learn from them either. Any one of the other organized league systems can do all of those as well, but it seems that APA is the more prevalent and easiest to locate. Local tournaments are great too, but I find that less coaching and advice is offered in those environments. That old saying of "you don't know what you don't know" kinda fits here, and once you realize that on every shot you have multiple options, both offensive and defensive, it often comes as an epiphany, and sucks you even further into the game.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I can't think of a single good player in the US come out from the league "system". It's not there for that, but they do help a lot with equipment sales which does indirectly help pro players with sponsorship money.
What do you think the total product sponsorship is for US pros?
If it's over 300k it's a shock.

APA making least 100 million plus what league ops get. Does nothing for pool. Players get a little better, handicap goes up and then they recruit more bangers to make more teams, like the cult it is.
 
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