Can You Improve?

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Gold Member
Silver Member
Its the little things at a point

What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.

Its picking up on little things that help my game and playing a bit more than I do. Lately Im not playing as much because business things are in the way. I know a few things I need a bit of work on because I know how they work I just need to practice them a few times. I've picked up a few new moves for my One Pocket Game that's always nice. I will when I get time.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Its picking up on little things that help my game and playing a bit more than I do. Lately Im not playing as much because business things are in the way. I know a few things I need a bit of work on because I know how they work I just need to practice them a few times. I've picked up a few new moves for my One Pocket Game that's always nice. I will when I get time.
Realising what you need to work on is the first step to improving. Good job.
 

gregnice37

Bar Banger, Cue Collector
Silver Member
I need table time without a doubt. But my back is so bad right now it's impossible. I'm hurting after 1 rack during league night, and breaking forget it, just a soft break gives me spasms.
 

One Pocket John

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.

#1 is what I'm always working on. I train to feel the QB as well as I can. On days that I'm feeling the QB real well, then its off to #2.

I'm retired and have a table. Table time is not an issue.

Good post

John
 

worktheknight

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I started shooting many years ago before all the teaching aids were available and I would play the best players I could find and see how long my $ 50.00 would last. Pick up something and go home and practice it.

I would use chalk to mark the table where the object ball and cue ball was and hit that shot until I could duplicate it. Then hit it with every spot around the cue like clock just to see how the cue ball would react.

I have shot 30 years in a traveling league and the operators of the league has used Champion Mercury Ultra cloth with a backing. In just the last month-month and a half, the league operator has switched to Champion Tour Edition 30-30 cloth without a backing. Wow !! am I lost, it will take about (as I am told) a half of year on our league tables to wear off the sheen on our league tables as everything is sliding and rolling forever and ever and ever and did mention forever??
Last Night, I pulled the rails and every staple off my table and a table recovery person is going to put this new cloth on. So far, it's been a nightmare for me to adjust.
I found my old books from Robert Byrnes where I have hundreds of notes in as his early books for beginners, intermediate and advanced play is what got me going to the next levels.
I will be marking the table and relearning all over again ( that's how I feel anyways ) as being stubborn is not getting the job done.

I'm not a pro by any means, but, have some hardware I am truly proud of, like over 100 pieces including state championships, perfect match 30-Zip, perfect match 50-Zip, this years winner of the sportmans classic 8 ball at the vnea world championships, last years 2nd place finish in the classic division's 9 ball as some 3rd and fourths from years past. I've won a seven state championship as well.
But, with the change of cloth, it's like starting over with cue ball control. I applaud the players who can adapt so well from table to table conditions. You may think that hitting the same shot over and over stinks - at least I do !!, but, it's what I will be doing to get back to where I feel competitive again.
Pool - I don't think you can ever learn enough.
Good Luck and drop me a line sometime to see how your doing. sales@cdand.com
Chuck
 

philly

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The better you get the tougher the game becomes because the better you get improvement comes in smaller increments. I find I get better if I have a short term goal such as an upcoming tournament that I am preparing for.
 

denzilla171

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.


That third category does not sound like "improving"..
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.

for me
my fundamentals are pretty good although i still need to work on my vision center

i drill more than play since there arent alot of people to play in my home room
(especially to play one pocket)
also i can only get out on the weekend days so my time for match play is limited


for sure more table time would help me with my speed control
often i am on the right tract for position but hit it alittle too hard or soft
i played straight pool for the first time in many years yesterday
i will add it to my list of games to play and practice
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
for me
my fundamentals are pretty good although i still need to work on my vision center

i drill more than play since there arent alot of people to play in my home room
(especially to play one pocket)
also i can only get out on the weekend days so my time for match play is limited


for sure more table time would help me with my speed control
often i am on the right tract for position but hit it alittle too hard or soft
i played straight pool for the first time in many years yesterday
i will add it to my list of games to play and practice
Get your vision centre fixed!!!!!!!!!!

It is the most vital part of accurate cueing and the game becomes a whole lot easier. If I can help in any way I'm only a pm away :)

The table time will definitely help with speed control. I'm one of those guys that needs to play a lot to get my speed control where I want it. If I don't play for a few days it feels like my arm belongs to someone else. So I have been hitting 100 straight in shots a day for months now. If I get 5 mins spare I hit as many straight in shots as I can at home. It has helped massively with consistency.

I forgot to mention in my OP... My break. It needs a lot of work. I have the power I just tend to lose the cue ball some times. Some days I will break like a pro and others I won't get a shot on the 1 in 4 hours.
 

drv4

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I need a combination of 1 and 3. Never taken lessons, only have been playing for a few years. I have found myself warming up by hitting cross table straight in shot ( placing cue ball by one pocket and object ball in middle of table) once I'm making these consistently I feel like I'm ready to start shooting. I'm gaining confidence though because players I used to have no business playing I can win a few racks against now.
 

Drop The Rock

1652nd on AZ Money List
Silver Member
Probably 1+2 because I get a fair amount of table time in. The only thing in #1 being my vision center. I have been trying to play with the cue in the middle of my chin for a while. I'm very right eye dominant. As a result I tend to use right hand English a lot! I have tried to adopt a fair amount of snooker fundamentals for everything else and its definitely helped but getting the cue under my right eye is a change that has had a ton of benefits, but something I'm not used to yet.

I have been playing for about 2 and a half years so experience is part of it for sure. I play a lot of one pocket as well and need to play better players in 9 ball so I can ask questions and learn patterns.
 

JoeyA

Efren's Mini-Tourn BACKER
Silver Member
Subscribing to a thread

If I wanted to subscribe to this thread and not post, when I opened up the thread, I would just click on THREAD TOOLS and click on subscribe to thread.

To get back on topic, I was watching Benji from England playing in the Florida 10 Ball tour and was admiring the way he stroked and ran the balls. Mike DeLawder missed a ball early in the set and Benji took off like a sprinter. Later on in the set Benji paused a moment and Mike started a run at him but again missed an easy shot and Benji coasted on in.

It looks like some players just have an easier time potting the balls and it almost always looks like it is a European or a left-hander like Rodney Morris. They just look more comfortable at the table. They don't always win but they just look like they are having an easier time running balls.

The fancy players who like to spin their rock at every opportunity look great when they are dialed in and making the object balls and getting shape but when they aren't dialed in, it gets kind of messy. The players who look more comfortable SEEM to be the ones who use less intentional side spin and rely on angles, rails and speed of cue ball to pot the object ball and get shape. Even when they miss, it doesn't look like such a mess.

I don't know if others see it this way or not and maybe it's just my perspective but I see myself as wanting to use less side spin as the years roll by, just because it SEEMS that is the way to be more consistent.

That being said, I was with a champion this past week and he mentioned that on straight in shots, he doesn't hit center cue ball, similar to what CJ suggests except that this particular champion uses a touch of outside most of the time on straight in shots. There are many different ways to play and people sometimes live most of their lives thinking that they just need to play more but don't because it is work.

I probably fit all three ways you described. :p

JoeyA

P.S. Since I posted in the thread, I am automatically subscribed to the thread so that when anyone posts in the thread, their post will appear when I log onto the Main Forum next time.


What does it or will it take for you to reach the next level?

I tend to class it in 3 different ways..

You have those that can benefit from a fundamental change because they aren't hitting the cue ball well enough...

You have those that hit the cue ball very well, but need experience against better players to pick up more knowledge and tactical awareness...

Then you have those that need more table time. Just playing hours each day to make sure everything is working in harmony and keeping your touch and feel for the game up to date... This is where I think I class my self at.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I wanted to subscribe to this thread and not post, when I opened up the thread, I would just click on THREAD TOOLS and click on subscribe to thread.

To get back on topic, I was watching Benji from England playing in the Florida 10 Ball tour and was admiring the way he stroked and ran the balls. Mike DeLawder missed a ball early in the set and Benji took off like a sprinter. Later on in the set Benji paused a moment and Mike started a run at him but again missed an easy shot and Benji coasted on in.

It looks like some players just have an easier time potting the balls and it almost always looks like it is a European or a left-hander like Rodney Morris. They just look more comfortable at the table. They don't always win but they just look like they are having an easier time running balls.

The fancy players who like to spin their rock at every opportunity look great when they are dialed in and making the object balls and getting shape but when they aren't dialed in, it gets kind of messy. The players who look more comfortable SEEM to be the ones who use less intentional side spin and rely on angles, rails and speed of cue ball to pot the object ball and get shape. Even when they miss, it doesn't look like such a mess.

I don't know if others see it this way or not and maybe it's just my perspective but I see myself as wanting to use less side spin as the years roll by, just because it SEEMS that is the way to be more consistent.

That being said, I was with a champion this past week and he mentioned that on straight in shots, he doesn't hit center cue ball, similar to what CJ suggests except that this particular champion uses a touch of outside most of the time on straight in shots. There are many different ways to play and people sometimes live most of their lives thinking that they just need to play more but don't because it is work.

I probably fit all three ways you described. :p

JoeyA

P.S. Since I posted in the thread, I am automatically subscribed to the thread so that when anyone posts in the thread, their post will appear when I log onto the Main Forum next time.
If it's straight in how do you know if it's outside or inside... Lol
 

Cameron Smith

is kind of hungry...
Silver Member
If I wanted to subscribe to this thread and not post, when I opened up the thread, I would just click on THREAD TOOLS and click on subscribe to thread.

To get back on topic, I was watching Benji from England playing in the Florida 10 Ball tour and was admiring the way he stroked and ran the balls. Mike DeLawder missed a ball early in the set and Benji took off like a sprinter. Later on in the set Benji paused a moment and Mike started a run at him but again missed an easy shot and Benji coasted on in.

It looks like some players just have an easier time potting the balls and it almost always looks like it is a European or a left-hander like Rodney Morris. They just look more comfortable at the table. They don't always win but they just look like they are having an easier time running balls.

The fancy players who like to spin their rock at every opportunity look great when they are dialed in and making the object balls and getting shape but when they aren't dialed in, it gets kind of messy. The players who look more comfortable SEEM to be the ones who use less intentional side spin and rely on angles, rails and speed of cue ball to pot the object ball and get shape. Even when they miss, it doesn't look like such a mess.

I don't know if others see it this way or not and maybe it's just my perspective but I see myself as wanting to use less side spin as the years roll by, just because it SEEMS that is the way to be more consistent.

That being said, I was with a champion this past week and he mentioned that on straight in shots, he doesn't hit center cue ball, similar to what CJ suggests except that this particular champion uses a touch of outside most of the time on straight in shots. There are many different ways to play and people sometimes live most of their lives thinking that they just need to play more but don't because it is work.

I probably fit all three ways you described. :p

JoeyA

P.S. Since I posted in the thread, I am automatically subscribed to the thread so that when anyone posts in the thread, their post will appear when I log onto the Main Forum next time.

I'm wondering if that fluency, or ease of pocketing balls, is partly in their head? The fluent players are more relaxed and confident in their pocketing abilities and they just get on with it. I've witnessed pros who are very deliberate on every shot, it looks like everything is such hard work. And then very good amateurs who make things look easy. The pro will obviously crush the very good amateur, but I have to believe that the pro could play just as fluently with the pressure off.

One example that comes to mind is pro snooker player Dave Harold. He's incredibly deliberate in competition but according to Stuart Pettman's book, in practice matches he's as quick and fluent as they come.
 

Banks

Banned
I think i can, i think i can, i think i can.

Still improving and in each of those ways. At least, i hope i am.
 
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