"Gold Crown" Ball Polisher

Hungarian

C'mon, man!
Silver Member
It's FINALLY finished!

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Very cool. You are well gifted with creativity and craftsmanship. It looks like it would come out a Brunswick factory.
 

DeeDeeCues

Well-known member
Awhile……you got good spelling and grammar……study more …..it will take you awhile longer.

You are wrong.

He was using it as a preposition, as in, 'polishing balls by hand would take a while.'

If he used it to modify a verb, he would use 'awhile', as in, 'I'm going to polish my balls for awhile.'

You used it incorrectly, as you used it as a preposition and should have said, 'a while'.

You can search, 'a while vs. awhile' and read Merriam-Webster's explanation.

And your comments about just buying a ball cleaner were dickish, at best.
 

ibuycues

I Love Box Cues
Silver Member
It's blue! I'm on the home stretch. i'm going to let the paint cure for a couple weeks before I install the stainless trim around the edge. Then it's done. Finally!

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This has got to be the best looking, most highly functioning ball polisher I have ever seen, maybe that anyone has ever seen.
You are to be congratulated for such good work!
I have thoroughly enjoyed the entire thread. I have been retired for many years, was an engineer for 35 years, but you have me now worrying again about the rate at which ions will migrate toward the insulant.

Thanks for a great thread.
Will Prout
 

kitsap

Registered
This has got to be the best looking, most highly functioning ball polisher I have ever seen, maybe that anyone has ever seen.
You are to be congratulated for such good work!
I have thoroughly enjoyed the entire thread. I have been retired for many years, was an engineer for 35 years, but you have me now worrying again about the rate at which ions will migrate toward the insulant.

Thanks for a great thread.
Will Prout

Will,

Once and engineer, always an engineer! :)

Doug
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This has got to be the best looking, most highly functioning ball polisher I have ever seen, maybe that anyone has ever seen.
You are to be congratulated for such good work!
I have thoroughly enjoyed the entire thread. I have been retired for many years, was an engineer for 35 years, but you have me now worrying again about the rate at which ions will migrate toward the insulant.

Thanks for a great thread.
Will Prout
Thanks, Will! It was a labor of love for sure. Although I enjoyed the build and the problem solving that came along with it, I'm glad it's completed and functioning as intended!
 

RussPrince

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nope, it's based on the Diamond ball polisher principle, sprocket in the middle separates the balls to avoid collision marks, and helps assist the rotation of the balls while they're spinning around the inside.
Hey rkc, I tried to send you a pm, but am unable to. I wanted to ask you a question offline regarding my ball polisher design, and don't want to derail this very nice thread illustrating rexus's amazing accomplishment. do you have any other contact info?
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hey rkc, I tried to send you a pm, but am unable to. I wanted to ask you a question offline regarding my ball polisher design, and don't want to derail this very nice thread illustrating rexus's amazing accomplishment. do you have any other contact info?
He is no longer on AZ. Get on his Facebook page.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Hey rkc, I tried to send you a pm, but am unable to. I wanted to ask you a question offline regarding my ball polisher design, and don't want to derail this very nice thread illustrating rexus's amazing accomplishment. do you have any other contact info?
Call me, 702-927-5689
 

RobM

New member
Same motor Diamond uses: 1/3hp Dayton, 1,725rpm at a 4:1 reduction. The platter will spin at 431rpm, just like the Diamond unit. No, the platter will not oscillate.
Ok, really dumb question but instead of the pulleys and belts, could I just use a dimmer switch (the special ones built for motors like ceiling fans) to slow the motor down? It would lose torque by not being on a 4 to 1 pulley but a much simpler build.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Ok, really dumb question but instead of the pulleys and belts, could I just use a dimmer switch (the special ones built for motors like ceiling fans) to slow the motor down? It would lose torque by not being on a 4 to 1 pulley but a much simpler build.
A d how would you power the double platter? And how well do you think a 110V motor designed to spin at 1725 rpms like being dialed down to 431 rpms, think it would build up heat??
 

Hungarian

C'mon, man!
Silver Member
Ok, really dumb question but instead of the pulleys and belts, could I just use a dimmer switch (the special ones built for motors like ceiling fans) to slow the motor down? It would lose torque by not being on a 4 to 1 pulley but a much simpler build.
It's possible with a special type of motor and controller but the polisher would cost $18,000 to build.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok, really dumb question but instead of the pulleys and belts, could I just use a dimmer switch (the special ones built for motors like ceiling fans) to slow the motor down? It would lose torque by not being on a 4 to 1 pulley but a much simpler build.
A d how would you power the double platter? And how well do you think a 110V motor designed to spin at 1725 rpms like being dialed down to 431 rpms, think it would build up heat??
It's possible with a special type of motor and controller but the polisher would cost $18,000 to build.
As stated above, there'd be too much resistance for the motor and it would most likely overheat. It's designed to run flat out 100% of the time. Motor aside, running the pulleys makes it easier for the platter to be offset which is what makes the balls spiral. I'm not saying it couldn't be done, but you'd have to be pretty precise in building a motor mount block in the cabinet and there's not much room in there.
 

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok, really dumb question but instead of the pulleys and belts, could I just use a dimmer switch (the special ones built for motors like ceiling fans) to slow the motor down? It would lose torque by not being on a 4 to 1 pulley but a much simpler build.
A direct drive on the platter would certainly simplify the machine. But a 'dimmer' switch won't slow down a large enough AC motor and it would be dangerously fast if you don't slow it down. You could possibly use a variable frequency drive (VFD) that controls the frequency of the power supplied to the motor to slow it. VFDs can be pricey and you may need a 3-phase motor.

Here's a 16 ball variation of the Diamond machine that uses one platter...
. This machine uses pulleys and a belt but could likely be modified to direct drive if you have a way to slow down the motor.

And to see another unique 16 ball machine check out cleangleem.com. It has with a simple, elegant design and works on a different principle than all the rest.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
A direct drive on the platter would certainly simplify the machine. But a 'dimmer' switch won't slow down a large enough AC motor and it would be dangerously fast if you don't slow it down. You could possibly use a variable frequency drive (VFD) that controls the frequency of the power supplied to the motor to slow it. VFDs can be pricey and you may need a 3-phase motor.

Here's a 16 ball variation of the Diamond machine that uses one platter...
. This machine uses pulleys and a belt but could likely be modified to direct drive if you have a way to slow down the motor.

And to see another unique 16 ball machine check out cleangleem.com. It has with a simple, elegant design and works on a different principle than all the rest.
The unit featured in the video is a neat design, but it appears the balls only spin on one axis. It appears the platter is slightly offset but I don't think it's offset enough to spiral the balls.
 
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