Help identifying pool balls

Cantmakeaball

New member
I’m requesting help identifying the manufacturer and time period of a set of pool balls that I stumbled across. I am not an expert but have never seen any quite like this and my friends have not either. After searching antique and vintage sites I can’t find anyone that has any like these. Thanks for your help if you know about them.
 

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Bob Jewett

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As mentioned in the post linked to above, those are the low end of Aramith balls. The patterns are silk-screened on. The original price was probably under $100, they are certainly post-1970, and in their present condition and missing two balls, I think you would be lucky to sell them for $20.

I would guess that those were made up to about 2000. (archive.org is down right now.) Aramith does not offer any silk-screened balls now. Their low-end offering is solid phenolic so the numbers can't wear off.
 
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Cantmakeaball

New member
As mentioned in the post linked to above, those are the low end of Aramith balls. The patterns are silk-screened on. The original price was probably under $100, they are certainly post-1970, and in their present condition and missing two balls, I think you would be lucky to sell them for $20.

I would guess that those were made up to about 2000. (archive.org is down right now.) Aramith does not offer any silk-screened balls now. Their low-end offering is solid phenolic so the numbers can't wear off.
Thank you for the information. Fortunately I was able to find one place with a partial set and have since completed the set. They are pretty unique in appearance and will see what they look like once I clean them up. Thanks for the information.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
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I wonder what a good set of old clay balls are worth today?
As you can see from the shopping link, you can probably get a set that is actually playable for around $100. Balls suitable for display are cheaper -- the cracks and chips are "features". There are many styles of clay balls, and some of them can run several thousand dollars in top condition.

The best reference for general billiard antique values is the book by the Stellingas. You can occasionally find a copy under $50 but expect to pay $70. It is a must-have for anyone interested in old billiard stuff.

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