How to level a pool table when the floor you have it on moves

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok. Based on all this info. i really don't think you're going to get this table very level(or stable). Unless you can get floor to STOP moving you're going to constantly chase this. Good luck.
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah I agree, this need to be addressed on a structural engineering forum. Ask those guys how to stabilize a residential foundation. Or better yet, just hire an engineer and then go forward with his plan.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah I agree, this need to be addressed on a structural engineering forum. Ask those guys how to stabilize a residential foundation. Or better yet, just hire an engineer and then go forward with his plan.
How-to is easy: steel girders to support the floor.

Paying for it and getting it done right are different matters.

Concrete patio and cheap structure, imo. Get that table out of there, before it causes a disaster.
 

Jimmorrison

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No I put jacks in basement so the main floor would stop moving so much. It's a very old house and the room it is in has no supports in basement to keep it from moving. The floor was not built to have all the weight on it and has shifted because it's over 115 years old
Ok. NOw we getting somewhere. Problem is easily solved. Your basement floor is not designed for that kind of point load. You need something under your Jack post to spread it out. Proper way is to cut out a 2x2 foot piece of floor, for every post. Dig down 2 feet, pour a pier. Easier would be to use 4x4s and plywood, to make 2x2 pads. One for each post. A couple of 4x4s, above the posts, ties it all together. That part of your house will not move. The rest of it might, depends on lots of variables. My house was built in 1886.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How-to is easy: steel girders to support the floor.

Paying for it and getting it done right are different matters.

Concrete patio and cheap structure, imo. Get that table out of there, before it causes a disaster.
Yep. As long as the floor keeps moving any attempt leveling the table will be futile.
 

logical

apart of their 'semi public'
Silver Member
This makes no sense to me. OP's posts are hard to make sense of. HOW is the table moving? How can dogs playing make balls move??? What kind of table is this? A REALLY light one it sounds like. Did OP put the table together???? Why wasn't frame leveled if he did?? This whole deal is strange.
Thats why I threw in the towel.

Sent from the future.
 

Jimmorrison

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If your whole foundation is failing, that’s a different issue. If you just want to eliminate the bounce, in the upper floor, that’s easy. The reason what you did, didn’t work, is because now the basement floor is bouncing. Spread out the load, on the basement floor. Any decent lumber yard can draw this up for you. Less then $500 in material. You already have the jack posts.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just like if you bounce on the middle you can see the balls move a hair
Put two cross members accross floor beams and floor jacks with everything screwed down so the floor can't wiggle.

Make footings for the floor joists since you have a dirt floor in the basement. Should be able to dig down a bit and use large cement blocks.

2 cross members and 4 jacks should hold up everything as long as they are under the pool tables feet. Extend the jacks so they push hard against the cross members.

Likely your table runs accross all the floor joists so that just a couple joists are holding up the table.
 
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MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This makes no sense to me. OP's posts are hard to make sense of. HOW is the table moving?
My table is in a house (pier and beam construction) where the hose heaves up and down based on the moisture in the soil.
The maximum extent is about 2 business card thicknesses (max to min).
So, I have a means to lift the side (or end) of the table and add pieces of paper (0.004") to shim it up, or remove them to shim it down.
 

Keith E.

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
1. Find someone in the building industry that is knowledgeable & reputable to get the "floor situation" handled.

2. Find a good table mechanic to handle the "table situation".

Keith
 

Jimmorrison

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Put two cross members accross floor beams and floor jacks with everything screwed down so the floor can't wiggle.

Make footings for the floor joists since you have a dirt floor in the basement. Should be able to dig down a bit and use large cement blocks.

2 cross members and 4 jacks should hold up everything as long as they are under the pool tables feet. Extend the jacks so they push hard against the cross members.

Likely your table runs accross all the floor joists so that just a couple joists are holding up the table.
Yes, this. Cross members above the posts, so all floor joists share the load. Piers or cribbing under the posts, so more of the basement floor shares the load. OP never said if basement floor is dirt or concrete, but that doesn't change the solution.
 
I don't see how doing anything other than replacing the structure beneath the floor can change the instability.

You question is confusing. You don't need to know how to level the table, you need to know how to keep the table level while the floor moves. WHILE THE FLOOR MOVES.

I don't think it is possible with any common resources. There is a self leveling pool table for cruise ships, but you'd probably be better off putting that table in a different house. Like one that is safe to put a table in.
I put some braces up and now I can jump in the room with no ball movement. Thanks for all the help guy. Have a good night
 
Put two cross members accross floor beams and floor jacks with everything screwed down so the floor can't wiggle.

Make footings for the floor joists since you have a dirt floor in the basement. Should be able to dig down a bit and use large cement blocks.

2 cross members and 4 jacks should hold up everything as long as they are under the pool tables feet. Extend the jacks so they push hard against the cross members.

Likely your table runs accross all the floor joists so that just a couple joists are holding up the table.

Yeah I agree, this need to be addressed on a structural engineering forum. Ask those guys how to stabilize a residential foundation. Or better yet, just hire an engineer and then go forward with his plan.
Foundation is in good shape just hade not supports on a 16ft by 18ft room I got it to stop bounce with some supports. Now I can jump on it with no bounce
 
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