Importance of climate control in a pool room

Kevin3824

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Recently I added air conditioning to the room with my pool table. I was literally in shock on the difference it seemed to make both in my enjoyment of the game as well as the way the table seems to respond.

This was only one more thing on my list of creating the same experience at home as I would have in a pool hall. Granted until I get a larger place and can out in a 9 ft table it will not be the same but it is steadily improving. The concept of the room being comfortably cool when it is 90+ degrees outside is very powerful. Prior I would simply go to a pool hall on really hot days because of the AC and sometimes I would get there and they would not even have it on.

Not sure how many of you out there do not have climate control where your table is or how many realize how much different the tables respond or enjoyment of the game is with it. The AC also reduces the humidity in the room as well.
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Gold Member
Silver Member
Humid play

Recently I added air conditioning to the room with my pool table. I was literally in shock on the difference it seemed to make both in my enjoyment of the game as well as the way the table seems to respond.

This was only one more thing on my list of creating the same experience at home as I would have in a pool hall. Granted until I get a larger place and can out in a 9 ft table it will not be the same but it is steadily improving. The concept of the room being comfortably cool when it is 90+ degrees outside is very powerful. Prior I would simply go to a pool hall on really hot days because of the AC and sometimes I would get there and they would not even have it on.

Not sure how many of you out there do not have climate control where your table is or how many realize how much different the tables respond or enjoyment of the game is with it. The AC also reduces the humidity in the room as well.

I played on slower than normal table the other day and then that coupled with humidity I got tired of it quickly and went home. Its not a lot of fun unless you can stroke like Hercules.
 

Colt Kodiak

Colt Kodiak
Silver Member
Recently I added air conditioning to the room with my pool table. I was literally in shock on the difference it seemed to make both in my enjoyment of the game as well as the way the table seems to respond.

This was only one more thing on my list of creating the same experience at home as I would have in a pool hall. Granted until I get a larger place and can out in a 9 ft table it will not be the same but it is steadily improving. The concept of the room being comfortably cool when it is 90+ degrees outside is very powerful. Prior I would simply go to a pool hall on really hot days because of the AC and sometimes I would get there and they would not even have it on.

Not sure how many of you out there do not have climate control where your table is or how many realize how much different the tables respond or enjoyment of the game is with it. The AC also reduces the humidity in the room as well.

I don't know about what "the difference" would be because I've always had a mini-split system by Fujitsu. My game room is on a lower level than the rest of the house and to tie it into the main house system just would not have worked. I do run a humidifier in the winter time and try to keep it at about 40% when I'm asking for heat.
I'm going to guess my table plays more consistent because of it.
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I look at all those classic Brunswick tables from the 1800s and early 1900s I can't help but think about the conditions those tables and players were subjected to back in the day. I grew up playing in a pool hall in Kentucky that had no A/C, but that would of been nothing to what the folks out west, or the deep south had to deal with back before the days of A/C. Just a guess here, but I would imagine that's why those classic tables from the turn of the century and beyond were built with huge beam construction and sometimes with 1-1/2" thick slate.
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I played on slower than normal table the other day and then that coupled with humidity I got tired of it quickly and went home. Its not a lot of fun unless you can stroke like Hercules.

I stroke like Samson. I love playing on slow tables. People who are used to "pitty pattering" the balls around on fast tables with bouncy rails are like fish out of water when they actually have to play with some "pace" on the ball.
 

cluelesscuer

New member
I found it's a lot harder to play when it's humid. Your stick gives you problem with stickiness. And the balls, most importantly the cue ball, roll slower.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
yep just like golfers. they love it when there is no wind, rain and fast greens.
but you arent a good golfer till you can also play when the perfect conditions turn sour.
 

Knels

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just had this discussion with a friend who swears by dehumidifiers. I know at home we can control temp/humidity, but at bars/pool halls we have no control over these things. Bars and pool halls are the only places that hold competitions and tournaments, so wouldn't it make sense to not mess with that stuff at our home rooms to be better adjusted to live tournament conditions? Unless turning stone is played in a lab or something...
 

Colt Kodiak

Colt Kodiak
Silver Member
I just had this discussion with a friend who swears by dehumidifiers. I know at home we can control temp/humidity, but at bars/pool halls we have no control over these things. Bars and pool halls are the only places that hold competitions and tournaments, so wouldn't it make sense to not mess with that stuff at our home rooms to be better adjusted to live tournament conditions? Unless turning stone is played in a lab or something...

Interesting thought. I just enjoying playing on a great table with a super bright light in a nice climate controlled room. But, I fully realize when I venture out, the conditions won't be like that. Guess good players learn to adapt to the conditions as they find them. Lighting is the most missed thing for me.
 

MikieG

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
On Saturday night, it has been raining for days here in Detroit. I stopped at Hall of Fame Billiards to shoot. When i got there they had both double doors propped open. I went inside and they did not have any a/c running. This place was nice.
For $12/hr, they could have ran the a/c. I looked around and it was just folks out on a saturday night, no real shooters.
I can only imagine how those tables played.
So i went on over to The Rack. Not quite as upscale, but proper none the less. They had their pockets shimmed to about 4.125". Its one thing to tighten em up, but when any shot with any power WILL bobble, you are doing nothing good for your customers.
I shot a few hours saturday night and returned sunday afternoon for a couple more. Good thing i have no delusions of grandure about my abilities or that table would have made me break my cue!
Consistant temp and humidity affect the balls, cloth and rails. Lucky for me, my game is unaffected by these inconsistancies.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
pool rooms are thier own worst enemy. mostly because those that open them are not good business people at all. the few that survive are in great spots or have a good owner on site.
 

De420MadHatter

SicBiNature
Silver Member
I stroke like Samson. I love playing on slow tables. People who are used to "pitty pattering" the balls around on fast tables with bouncy rails are like fish out of water when they actually have to play with some "pace" on the ball.

Beautiful words :thumbup:
 

Gunn_Slinger

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In my area ( dc,maryland , virginia ) . the tables stay wet most
of the summer. Not many 'real' pool rooms' around.
'Up-scale' rooms leave doors open, turn off a/c, don't clean
tables,etc. They don't understand that not only do the tables
play poorly , but on wet dirty tables, the cloth wears out
quicker than dry clean tables.
My table has its own a/c and heater that run together
to keep the room dry.
 
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