Joint conversions and retaps, what can and cannot be realistically done?

Bluejuice

Registered
Not sure if a similar thread has already been posted but,

I currently have this Jacoby ultra pro in 5/16x18 with a brass insert I got a while back and I'd like to fit it with a radial butt. Is it possible to drill right into the brass insert and use a radial tap on it?

And if so would it be expensive to the point that I'm better of just getting a new cue?

Are there many risks of serious damage with such a procedure?

I'm also curious in the possibility of converting a mezz wavy shaft to radial.

I'd appreciate any form of of advice or help, thanks.
 

Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Plug and re-thread, it`s done all the time. Have a cuemaker that knows what he´s doing do the job.
 

Wilk

Registered
I don't post often, as as a hobby cue builder there is a lot to learn here and many different ways to accomplish any given task. I may not agree with all opinions, but in most instances they are all valuable in their own way.

However your opinion just broke the laws of physics. You could plug any known shaft with 4-6 inches of lead and it would not affect the cue ball path in any measurable way other than distance traveled due to a possible efficiency increase. Even if the plug was put in poorly with a hand drill no affect could be measured. The shaft would physically fail first.

Inside the realm of reason and physics, basically nothing much south of the natural bridge point has any impact on deflection, swerve,or what ever you prefer to term it. That is why all shafts have a natural pivot point to compensate for these effects. And guess what the pivot point is very close tot he hollow transition on all wooden shafts. On your Predator it's within an inc, I have torn apart enough to be confident in that. Those that are filled (like OB) are a a bit forward of the hollow depending on the fill weight.

If you had issues with a plugged predator shaft it was either off center, or poorly faced. Straight and deflection are not correlated in any way. I personally am not a predator fan, but physics don't really care about brands, just rules and they follow them just like everyone else.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't post often, as as a hobby cue builder there is a lot to learn here and many different ways to accomplish any given task. I may not agree with all opinions, but in most instances they are all valuable in their own way.

However your opinion just broke the laws of physics. You could plug any known shaft with 4-6 inches of lead and it would not affect the cue ball path in any measurable way other than distance traveled due to a possible efficiency increase. Even if the plug was put in poorly with a hand drill no affect could be measured. The shaft would physically fail first.

Inside the realm of reason and physics, basically nothing much south of the natural bridge point has any impact on deflection, swerve,or what ever you prefer to term it. That is why all shafts have a natural pivot point to compensate for these effects. And guess what the pivot point is very close tot he hollow transition on all wooden shafts. On your Predator it's within an inc, I have torn apart enough to be confident in that. Those that are filled (like OB) are a a bit forward of the hollow depending on the fill weight.

If you had issues with a plugged predator shaft it was either off center, or poorly faced. Straight and deflection are not correlated in any way. I personally am not a predator fan, but physics don't really care about brands, just rules and they follow them just like everyone else.

Is that a response to Jersey Bill ?
He was joking.
 
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