Learning to Shoot with your Opposite Hand

arcstats

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've set a goal for myself that by the end of the year I'm able to shoot using my opposite hand with an acceptable level of confidence. I mostly play 14.1 on my Diamond Pro-AM, shoot left-handed, and I want to reduce the number of awkward body angle shots that subsequently require the use of the bridge when I'm on the wrong side of the table (as fate would have it, they often seem to come up at the most critical times). Being able to flip hands seems like the most logical solution.

I'm positive many players have gone down this road before. I'd welcome any suggestions to help build a step-by-step program to achieve this goal. I'm thinking maybe start developing a stroke one handed then build the proper stance, followed by incorporating the bridge hand. Just trying to flip everything at once seems so overwhelming as a starting point to even hit the cue properly.

I thank everyone in advance for any suggestions.
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
A noble aspiration, but …

Opposite hand shooting has never been less important than it is today. That's because of the cue extension, the screw on addition to a cue that makes it much longer. Most serious players have one and if you don't have one, you should get one.

Opposite hand shooting is needed only occasionally these days. That said, there's no denying that you'll still need to use the bridge much more than occasionally.

Do you practice using the bridge? BCA Open and Mosconi Cup Champion Tony Robles of Brooklyn, New York, told me that back when he competed regularly, he devoted 15 minutes of every practice session to using the bridge.

However you proceed, good luck with your game. You are obviously committed to improving,
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Play opposite handed for a set amount of time every time you play.

Yes this is really the only way to do it that makes sense at your stage- just do as above until you are comfortable enough to use it in competition, or in the middle of a high run if you play 14.1. People who are super confident with either hand at pool practiced for many years almost every day for some time period with their opposite hand.

Getting a good rear extension for your cue of choice is a great option as well- that may require some research and dollar investment too- but well worth it. You can do that three ways: 1. have a custom cue maker refit your existing cue with a rear extension if possible, 2. buy a cue that is available with it's own rear extension (research internet), 3. buy a rear extension kit sold by some cue manufacturers for their own cues and rig the bumper onto a cue you already own that will then accept the extension ( this works too- I have done it on less expensive cues ). There are also rear extensions that will connect to almost any cue and are put on and removed at will without requiring any butt end work on a cue.
 

DynoDan

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’d start with the cheap/universal example. Unless you are exceptionally tall, you may find the mechanical bridge is still needed for some shots. Older players with long experience using it, still prefer it to the wobbly/erratic stroke motion that results from overreaching with an extension.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’d start with the cheap/universal example. Unless you are exceptionally tall, you may find the mechanical bridge is still needed for some shots. Older players with long experience using it, still prefer it to the wobbly/erratic stroke motion that results from overreaching with an extension.

Yes, true, now i see some using the extension on the butt end WITH the mechanical- which gives you the stability AND the stroke- I like that idea best; unless one has the time to invest in becoming an opposite hand expert.
 
Top