Moving a Table Myself

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hello all, I'm looking for some advice on moving a pool table. I finally got the go-ahead from the old lady to get one for the basement and I'm chomping at the bit here. :thumbup2: The basement JUST has room to fit a 9' table, but an 8-footer or Pro 8 would probably be a little better being less cramped.

I'm looking in about a 5-hour driving radius from Atlanta. I've searched all over Craigslist and found a bunch of nice tables. Mainly looking at Gold Crowns, but I'm keeping an open mind for more furniture-ish (which my wife would prefer) tables like this Gandy for instance.

Whichever way I go with the purchase, I was planning on moving it and at least partially reassembling it myself to save costs. In my mind I would then have more cash to bring in a good mechanic to do all the leveling, rubbers, felt, extending of subrails, etc that may be needed.

I've never completely disassembled/reassembled a Gold Crown though, only some Rec Warehouse type of furniture tables a few years ago. Is that something I should be able to do, or should I be getting professionals to move it? I feel pretty confident that I could at least DISassemble it... :D

My real concern is about moving it. Can I fit and transport all the components safely in the bed of a Ford Ranger? Does the frame disassemble or would I need to keep it together as a box? I have access to a trailer but I was hoping to avoid towing one 400 miles if possible.

I just want to make sure I don't drive 5 hours and come across any show-stopper issues.


PS, anybody have an Oversize 8 Foot GC in the Atlanta area they're looking to sell??
 

fastone371

Certifiable
Silver Member
I fit my 9' Gold Crown in the rear of a Chrysler Town & Country mini-van with the rear seats removed, it was completely disassembled. As far as disassembling a GC, you just need to make sure to disassemble in the correct order. Also be aware it may have pinned slates.
 

tjohnson

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My real concern is about moving it. Can I fit and transport all the components safely in the bed of a Ford Ranger?

I moved a GC1 pro 8 in a Toyota Highlander, so you should have no problem. Frame disassembles easily, if necessary. Fastone gave good advice re: pinned slates. Once disassembled every piece of a GC can easily be moved by one person, except the slates, which takes two. Those things are heavy!
 
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pocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
By "myself" I hope you mean without paying a pro to do it? Those slates are heavier than %$^&, and not a one man job.
 

BBC

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Moving a Pool Table

My advise is to number match everything, take plenty of pictures and a video of the dismantling in stages, Fully Assembled, Rails/Cloth Removed, Slates Removed, etc...

I used masking tape with a number or letter to ID its matching component, Rails, Pocket Casting to Rail, Pocket to Pocket Casting, Gulley/Return System, Slates, Frame, etc...

As mentioned before, the slates may have matching Pins and Bushings at the Slate Joint Faces, be careful not to lift the Slates when unfasten, pull each end Slate slowly and straight back exposing the Joint Faces.

Handling the slates is a TWO MAN job, they are heavy.

I would strongly recommend a professional to do the finial assembly, good luck with your move.

BBC
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
By "myself" I hope you mean without paying a pro to do it? Those slates are heavier than %$^&, and not a one man job.

That is what I mean. I'm definitely going to have a buddy with me to help out. Those things are no joke!
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
What are you guys talking about, I move slates by myself all the time and I'm 58 years old:thumbup:
 

rikdee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Go to the Chicago Billiard Museum site find and download a copy of the Gold Crown I Service Manual. This will show you precisely how to take apart and re-assemble any early GC.
 

67GT500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As RKC stated, the slates can be moved with with one person but definately need the right technique and tools. This pic shows the pins that the older brunswicks have and a useful tool for moving slates. There's also a handle that clamps to the top of the slate to pull it around with. Hat's off to Glenn and all the other table mechanics that deal with this everyday. If I remember correctly each of my slates weighed over 200lbs. Since you got the green light from the wife, do it right the first time and bye a commercial table:wink:

Good luck and enjoy your table,
Dean
 

PoolTable911

AdvancedBilliardSolutions
Silver Member
As RKC stated, the slates can be moved with with one person but definately need the right technique and tools. This pic shows the pins that the older brunswicks have and a useful tool for moving slates. There's also a handle that clamps to the top of the slate to pull it around with. Hat's off to Glenn and all the other table mechanics that deal with this everyday. If I remember correctly each of my slates weighed over 200lbs. Since you got the green light from the wife, do it right the first time and bye a commercial table:wink:

Good luck and enjoy your table,
Dean

Got to love the OTLvise. Makes moving slate alone a breeze.
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I fit my 9' Gold Crown in the rear of a Chrysler Town & Country mini-van with the rear seats removed, it was completely disassembled. As far as disassembling a GC, you just need to make sure to disassemble in the correct order. Also be aware it may have pinned slates.

I moved a GC1 pro 8 in a Toyota Highlander, so you should have no problem. Frame disassembles easily, if necessary. Fastone gave good advice re: pinned slates. Once disassembled every piece of a GC can easily be moved by one person, except the slates, which takes two. Those things are heavy!

Thanks for the size references, guys. I think both of those spaces are pretty close to the size of my truck bed. I think this is gonna work! :grin-devilish:

Now to rearrange the basement and also find the table...
 
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Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My advise is to number match everything, take plenty of pictures and a video of the dismantling in stages, Fully Assembled, Rails/Cloth Removed, Slates Removed, etc...

I used masking tape with a number or letter to ID its matching component, Rails, Pocket Casting to Rail, Pocket to Pocket Casting, Gulley/Return System, Slates, Frame, etc...

As mentioned before, the slates may have matching Pins and Bushings at the Slate Joint Faces, be careful not to lift the Slates when unfasten, pull each end Slate slowly and straight back exposing the Joint Faces.

Handling the slates is a TWO MAN job, they are heavy.

I would strongly recommend a professional to do the finial assembly, good luck with your move.

BBC

That's good to remember, thanks. I'm just gonna have my buddy hold the camera phone, masking tape and Sharpie until it's time to carry slate!
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What are you guys talking about, I move slates by myself all the time and I'm 58 years old:thumbup:

LOL unfortunately my job sitting at a desk pushing buttons doesn't prepare me very well for tossing slates around! That's what friends are for, right? :winknudge:
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As RKC stated, the slates can be moved with with one person but definately need the right technique and tools. This pic shows the pins that the older brunswicks have and a useful tool for moving slates. There's also a handle that clamps to the top of the slate to pull it around with. Hat's off to Glenn and all the other table mechanics that deal with this everyday. If I remember correctly each of my slates weighed over 200lbs. Since you got the green light from the wife, do it right the first time and bye a commercial table:wink:

Good luck and enjoy your table,
Dean

Got to love the OTLvise. Makes moving slate alone a breeze.

That is a kickass looking dolly! Wish I had the extra $1200 to drop on one of those, but hopefully I'll only be moving these slates once! ;)
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Go to the Chicago Billiard Museum site find and download a copy of the Gold Crown I Service Manual. This will show you precisely how to take apart and re-assemble any early GC.

I need to strengthen my Google-fu. I was looking for those everywhere (except there).... :eek:

Thanks!
 

jologs1

Registered
Gold crown 8 ft pro

To op , there is a used gold crown 8 ft pro in daytona billiards plus store . I think its a gc 1
 

Atlatlien

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The Search Is Over

So I didn't get my Gold Crown. I did however score a very nice Peter Vitalie table at a very good price. Did the disassembly and transport myself with the help of the guy I bought it from.

Took the rails, bed cloth and slates off, stacked the slates separated by old comforters in the bed of the truck, then wrapped the rails in moving blankets and set them on top of the slates. The frame fit in the trailer perfectly so we just picked it up and set in in there. Strapped everything down nice and tight and hit the road.

I think if I had disassembled the frame, that I could have probably fit it all into the bed of my Ranger, but that would have been a lot of heavy hardwood piled on top of the slates. Probably not a good idea. Also, had it been a Gold Crown or other table with pedestals instead of 4 legs, it wouldn't have been easy to fit in that small of a truck bed.

Thanks everyone for your input. I'm off to find a light and a good mechanic to come level it and get this cloth back on.
 

Cuefinger

Registered
Moving a table by yourself

You may already know this, but it's worth repeating. Mark everything in relation to the head and the foot of the table, especially the slates. You'll want to match the slates to their screw holes on re-assembly and this will help. When you get to the point where you are looking at the slates still screwed down to the table remember to use a black permanent marker and draw a half moon on the slates, crossing all three slates in one motion. This will help re-align the slates at re-assembly in their proper orientation. Then, remove only the slate screws from the two end slates, leaving the center slate screwed to the table. Carefully remove the two end slates and remove them to your vehicle. I use a full sheet of cardboard to protect one slate from another, stacking them on themselves flat, watch out for errant staples, screws, debris, anything that might damage the face of the slates. Before removing the middle slate mark the frame along the sides of the slate. This will again aid when re-positioning the slates on re-assembly.
I use zip lock baggies to keep hardware separated. Mark the bags indicating what that group of hardware was used for. Make note of anything that was missing at dis-assembly or you'll go crazy trying to find that missing bolt or screw that might not have been there originally. It also helps if only one person is responsible for removing hardware or you'll simply assume "the other guy" removed it when actually it was never there.
 

over60pirate

Registered
If you have a little mechanical skills, and can read a level, and use a straight edge, you should set it up yourself.
I recently, with Wife's help, moved and reassembled an 8' Olhausen we bought.
Google how to do it. Not a big deal.

Then again, if you have $ coming out the yazoo, buy a new one and have it installed.
 

PoolTable911

AdvancedBilliardSolutions
Silver Member
If you have a little mechanical skills, and can read a level, and use a straight edge, you should set it up yourself.
I recently, with Wife's help, moved and reassembled an 8' Olhausen we bought.
Google how to do it. Not a big deal.

Then again, if you have $ coming out the yazoo, buy a new one and have it installed.

Great advice.........:eek:
 
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