Multiple Shafts

Pin

Registered
Custom Peradon - also a one-piece. Used to use a Woods snooker cue until I found it was a tad too heavy for English pool.
Ironically I used to use a custom peradon. It was 55" and about 14oz, and I decided it was a bit too short and light :)
 

Greg M

Active member
Ironically I used to use a custom peradon. It was 55" and about 14oz, and I decided it was a bit too short and light :)
I know of a guy on TSF used a 49" cue with an 8mm tip and about the same weight. Some people have outrageous specs. My Peradon is hand-spliced at 57", 9mm and 17.5oz. I love the thing.
 

9ball5032

AzB Gold Member
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Multiple shafts.
When Hard Times was open most of the Golf players on the 6 x 12 , had pool shafts and smaller shafts (10-12mm) for the Golf table.

A lot of the other players usually had an extra shaft for 9 ball tournament play or in case they were in action in case a tip popped off. Or if they were not playing good and felt a shaft change was the ticket.

Lasting.
If you keep it out of temperature extremes, and don't take off wood when you clean it, it can last the lifetime of the butt.
 
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PDX

AzB Silver Member
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Only two of these shafts have matching tapers, and they do not play similar. Each shaft plays differently. After having bought and sold numerous cues over the years, I now prefer to have a different shaft than a different cue.

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•Solid maple with a Z^2 taper
•Older shaft with great wood and grain.
•Conical taper
•Stock shaft with ivory ferrule. This one plays better than the other stock shaft.
•Old Falcon shaft that makes the cue play/fee like my old Scruggs
•Second stock shaft with ivory ferrule.
 
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Pin

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I know of a guy on TSF used a 49" cue with an 8mm tip and about the same weight. Some people have outrageous specs. My Peradon is hand-spliced at 57", 9mm and 17.5oz. I love the thing.
Nice. I came around to 57", 9mm and 17oz too!
 

Greg M

Active member
Pin answered he question.. it's really different equipment. No one plays 9 ball or one pocket?
.
Nine-ball isn't possible without numbered balls and one-pocket would mostly be unheard of. There are American tables available, but they're not as common as English ones.
 

Pin

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Pin answered he question.. it's really different equipment. No one plays 9 ball or one pocket
Most snooker and pool clubs have at least one American table, where people sometimes play 9-ball, but the other games are almost unknown here.

Almost all English tables have balls without numbers (reds and yellows instead of solids and stripes), so 9-ball wouldn't work with that equipment.
Straight pool, banks, and one pocket would work in theory, but I've never seen anyone playing any of them (except for myself, as I sometimes play straight pool on an English table as solo practice).

(I think banking is a bit harder on English tables too, because of the cut of the pockets. But the games would still work.)
 

Greg M

Active member
Nice. I came around to 57", 9mm and 17oz too!
9mm feels so much better than using a regular 9.5mm snooker cue. My Woods cue was 19.5oz, which is far too heavy for my liking, and only really suited me for snooker. I also prefer the feel of a 57" cue to a standard 58".
 
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MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have 3 shafts for my play cue::
Z2-S-tuned for play most of the time
Z2 if something happens to the Z2-S-tuned
314(1) if I am not in stroke that night (it is more forgiving of stroke errors)
 
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Thunder Thighs

learning daily...
Silver Member
It may be a disadvantage sometimes to have multiple shafts. Sure I have a couple of favorites. But I’m guilty of losing consistency when I use different shafts each week.
 
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philly

AzB Gold Member
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4 identical shafts for my player.
Even the length of the tapers are identical.
I rotate them, one through four.
 

terpdad

Registered
I have 2 shafts for my cue. If I'm being honest, there's little reason for me to get another cue or shaft, but I plan to purchase each later this year. For me, it's been a fun experiment to find what I like best after getting back into the game. I am not an elite player, so while I have gravitated to a setup that I like best, sometimes it's just fun to play w/ something else.
 
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eg9327

Member
Can't really answer your question, but English Billiards is a great game for practice. You can play it on a regular table, you can play it alone, and it forces you to think more about the weight of the cue ball. Cue ball direction and reaction is as important (or more important) than any other ball on the table. For American games speed is much less important. Just make the ball and leave the cue ball in a reasonably defined area. That strategy won't win you many games in English Pool.
 
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hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I live in the UK and mainly play English pool with a cue similar to a snooker cue. I play some American pool, but much less.

So I have some questions about multiple shafts.

Why do you have multiple shafts?

How long do you expect a typical shaft to last? Should it last the life of the cue (without warping or losing quality)?

Snooker players expect their game to be seriously hampered if they have to change their cue. Even if the new one has very similar specs, it doesn't play quite the same. Is this a problem for American players when they have to change shaft?

More shafts = more tips to try out without without having to keep re-tipping one. Multiple joint types make you able to try out different butts with them. Can loan them to other players to try out when someone else is looking for a shaft to buy. Sometimes it's fun to just swap to something different. Keeping them around for travel so I don't lose a $500 Revo on a plane. If a tip gets damaged or shaft dinged or broken during a tournament you can swap it out, same thing if you are just not "felling it" when using one, can swap it out.

I have about 14 shafts between my son and I, some 3/8x10 some radial, some same shaft just different joints, some are way different, some are just stock from the original cue that I replaced with an LD shaft. It can take a long time and trying out dozens of shafts to find a good one, I just don't sell all of them as I move on to using something else.
 
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HNTFSH

Birds, Bass & Bottoms
Gold Member
Silver Member
For me, switching a shaft on the player is just like using my sneaky now and then. Keeps things fresh, probably increases a little re-connection to a certain hit/feel recognition and of course, serves as a back-up should I blow out a tip during play.
 
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