Multiple Shafts

Pin

Registered
I live in the UK and mainly play English pool with a cue similar to a snooker cue. I play some American pool, but much less.

So I have some questions about multiple shafts.

Why do you have multiple shafts?

How long do you expect a typical shaft to last? Should it last the life of the cue (without warping or losing quality)?

Snooker players expect their game to be seriously hampered if they have to change their cue. Even if the new one has very similar specs, it doesn't play quite the same. Is this a problem for American players when they have to change shaft?
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
I live in the UK and mainly play English pool with a cue similar to a snooker cue. I play some American pool, but much less.

So I have some questions about multiple shafts.

Why do you have multiple shafts?

How long do you expect a typical shaft to last? Should it last the life of the cue (without warping or losing quality)?

Snooker players expect their game to be seriously hampered if they have to change their cue. Even if the new one has very similar specs, it doesn't play quite the same. Is this a problem for American players when they have to change shaft?
It's a big hassel to get a new shaft if you should have to. You have to send off the butt wait maybe a couple of months. You don't want a cue with just one shaft. Anything can happen to it.

The resale value is more when you have a new shaft as well. Really no down side to having extra shafts.
 

Greg M

Active member
Always kind of wondered this myself. I assume it's though different shafts can be used for different purposes. For example, one shaft may be a simple backup, another may have less deflection or a narrower or thicker tip size, and so on. There could be numerous reasons for players carrying multiple shafts. As far as I know, joints aren't as proprietary in American pool cues as some may be with English pool or snooker cues. A lot of different shafts can be used with a lot of different butts.

Nice to see another English pool player on here, by the way. What cue do you use?

But, yeah, I get where you're coming from. I play English pool with a one-piece cue, so the idea of having multiple shafts for the same cue is kind of strange to me.
 
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tim913

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have two shafts with me just in case a tip comes off or I crack a ferrule,which one of them has now.
 

Straightpool_99

I see dead balls
Silver Member
I live in the UK and mainly play English pool with a cue similar to a snooker cue. I play some American pool, but much less.

So I have some questions about multiple shafts.

Why do you have multiple shafts?

How long do you expect a typical shaft to last? Should it last the life of the cue (without warping or losing quality)?

Snooker players expect their game to be seriously hampered if they have to change their cue. Even if the new one has very similar specs, it doesn't play quite the same. Is this a problem for American players when they have to change shaft?
Tip falls off or goes dead in a tournament, you have a replacement, likewise if it breaks. Modern laminated shafts from the same manufacturer and with the same specs play similar enough not to matter. Whenever I have two shafts like this, I make a point out of playing both shafts equally, as well, so that one doesn't have a big "pillow tip" and the other a rock hard small tip, and they have similar wear.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Why do you have multiple shafts?
Two identical shafts - in case sh*t happens (hint: it does).
How long do you expect a typical shaft to last?
Longer than me.
Should it last the life of the cue (without warping or losing quality)?
I’ve used mine exclusively for 20-some years with no loss of quality.
Snooker players expect their game to be seriously hampered if they have to change their cue. Even if the new one has very similar specs, it doesn't play quite the same. Is this a problem for American players when they have to change shaft?
If I had to change shafts I might have to quit - my shaft and I are one.

pj <- in a manner of speaking
chgo
 
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AndRun

Registered
I can't speak about snooker as I have only ever played it for 20 minutes in my entire life.

For pocket billiards for the most part, I only need a butt (uniloc) and 2 shafts. One for playing, the other for breaking.
But I found myself needing a spare after a recent tip change wasn't done right.

I've been looking for another Predator Z2. But Predator came up with a Carbon Fiber cue made to mimic the Z technology.
So I got that and kept my Z2 as backup now. Initially, I was just curious and then got swept by the hypes.

The tip on my break cue is robust that it's hard yet can impart spin. (Breaking and running out with the break cue is more than merely possible.) That makes it a good shaft to use on a critical straight shot. Z shafts arent as accurate on straight shots.
So yes, occasionally, I'd change shaft. But doing it too often is a distraction. So Id do it when distraction is needed. Like during a pressure match on the last shot with tension runs high.

As far as shaft life.... well... this is my personal opinion.
The life of a shaft depends on when the owner wants to replace it.

A warped shaft can be sanded and restraightened. And it will likely be done far in between throughout the lifetime that overthinning is unlikely to be a concern.
A dirty shaft can be cleaned and retouched.
A cracked ferrule can be replaced, just as the tip is replaceable as well.
Though not recommended, even the pin can be replaced. Then again the pin is so hard it's not easy to break for a decent shaft. So it will likely outlast the shaft.

An owner who doesn't use the shaft often might keep it for keepsake or simply hasn't found motivation to sell it.
An owner who uses the shaft often might either maintain it well and keep it forever,
or be enticed by another shaft.
 
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maha

from way back when
Silver Member
i have almost all my butts with the same joint. so all my shafts are interchangeable. makes life easy.

good shafts last forever and do not warp. i have more than 50 year old shafts and all are straight.
 
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pwd72s

recreational banger
Silver Member
Because it was shipped to me with two shafts. Figuring it's nice to have a spare, I carry 2 for my main playing cue.

I also have a back up cue with 2 shafts...the original and another I ordered, supposedly low deflection. I eventually went back to the original shaft with that cue.

Hate to admit it, but I'm a bit of an equipment junkie.
 
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Pin

Registered
Nice to see another English pool player on here, by the way. What cue do you use?
I have a one-piece Woods (www.woodscues.com). It's not a prestige brand, but I think they're well-made (the only thing I don't know about is the quality/age of the ash, which maybe would affect the durability of the cue) and they give you lots of information when you're choosing so the specs are exact.

How about you?
 

Greg M

Active member
I have a one-piece Woods (www.woodscues.com). It's not a prestige brand, but I think they're well-made (the only thing I don't know about is the quality/age of the ash, which maybe would affect the durability of the cue) and they give you lots of information when you're choosing so the specs are exact.

How about you?
Custom Peradon - also a one-piece. Used to use a Woods snooker cue until I found it was a tad too heavy for English pool.
 
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ceebee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Spare tire
Spare gun
Spare girl
Spare shaft

Was there a question somewhere?
Sounds like good operational qualities, because you can never know, what will happen next. On a couple of my shafts, they have different length ferrules, but all of them have the same tip. I use an Orlandi Cue, because I like his Conical joint. All of industry uses conical joints on their tooling. It guarantees good & true alignment through a joint.
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
Custom Peradon - also a one-piece. Used to use a Woods snooker cue until I found it was a tad too heavy for English pool.
What are you referring to when you say English pool? I played pool in a number of European countries including England and there was a difference in some of the pool tables.

Both England and Italy while the pool tables had pockets similar to the size of an American table, they were still rounded similar to a snooker table. Anything down the rail had to be hit perfect.

They were pretty challenging to play on. I doubt playing straight pool I could run 40 or 50 balls on one of those tables.

Most all the small bar tables over there were like that with the snooker style pockets. Playing 8 ball they use a strategy like you're playing golf where they lag the balls up to the pocket and if it doesn't go they block the pocket. and hope to get them in on the next shot.
 
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The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
Played with the same butt and single shaft for about 20yrs. Once I bought a new cue a little while back it came with a tip size that I was not very comfortable with. After a short while with that shaft I bought another with a smaller tip. Since then I use the original 12.5mm pro taper shaft for 14.1 and the 12mm conical taper for rotation games.

I found that in 14.1 I'm moving the CB around a lot less and appreciate the stiffer hit when playing short tight shape.

I wouldn't have two shafts of the same type in my bag. That said, if I had unlimited carrying space, a caddy and unlimited funds I might carry triplicates of everything....lol
 
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