New glossary of pool and billiards terms and phrases, including gambling stuff

dr_dave

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I've heard this term to describe a handicap for specifically a one pocket game and I'm not really sure what the exact handicap is or even if I'm getting it right but it was along the lines of 2and a stick or maybe
2and a pick? Anyone help out sthat one

Anybody?

Thanks,
Dave
 

Bob Jewett

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I've heard this term to describe a handicap for specifically a one pocket game and I'm not really sure what the exact handicap is or even if I'm getting it right but it was along the lines of 2and a stick or maybe
2and a pick? Anyone help out sthat one

onepocket.org has a glossary of terms and a list of handicaps, but that's not there. They only show simple ball spots.

I believe a "pick" is the right to choose any ball, take it from the table and put it in your pocket right after the break. There is a section on handicaps in Winning One Pocket and Robin describes this spot but does not call it a "pick".

The 2 part could be either a 9-7 spot (or 8-6) or the right to break a second time if you don't like how the first went. Or maybe they were talking about two picks and then play 8-8 with the spottee already having two balls.

Robin also has a glossary.
 

dr_dave

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In pool, I think I've heard the term refer to the entries in a tournament that had no chance of any return.
Thanks Bob. I revised it:

dead money: gambling wager one is likely to lose; or the tournament entry fee of a player with no chance of cashing.

Catch you later,
Dave
 
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pt109

WO double hemlock
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I've heard this term to describe a handicap for specifically a one pocket game and I'm not really sure what the exact handicap is or even if I'm getting it right but it was along the lines of 2and a stick or maybe
2and a pick? Anyone help out sthat one

Anybody?

Thanks,
Dave
ONE POCKET....
Two and hit means you can run no more than two balls, then you can play safe.
Two and stop means you can run no more than two balls, then it's your opponent's shot.
The pick means you can pick one ball up after the break...sometimes to spot it....
...sometimes to put it in your pocket.

These terms are regional....some places don't recognize these terms.
 

o.g. (old guy)

mark
Silver Member
The following is already on the list:

freeze up: agree to a set amount of money a gambling match will be played to, not quitting until the "frozen up" amount has been won.

Is "freeze out" different?

Thanks,
Dave

It's possibly the same, but like I said, it's been so long I don't remember. I'm on the west coast, maybe a regional term like many of these are. Just want to say thanks Dave for all the effort you put into this glossary, it's a nice resource.
 

dr_dave

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ONE POCKET....
Two and hit means you can run no more than two balls, then you can play safe.
Two and stop means you can run no more than two balls, then it's your opponent's shot.
The pick means you can pick one ball up after the break...sometimes to spot it....
...sometimes to put it in your pocket.

These terms are regional....some places don't recognize these terms.
Thanks for the info.

Regards,
Dave
 

mnotdun

AzB Silver Member
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"chop that dead wood"

meaning, when you're too lazy to attempt a run out, let your opponent chop away until he leaves you the last 3 or 4...
 

mnotdun

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A lot of mine are southern terms, not sure if others use these but for what its worth..

"dirt pile"

meaning, when your opponent (or yourself) breaks, and the rack of balls barely moves.. leaves the balls in a loose cluster.. we say "Thanks for leaving me this here dirt pile.." or "I left you a dirt pile to cleanup.."
 

dr_dave

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A lot of mine are southern terms, not sure if others use these but for what its worth..

"dirt pile"

meaning, when your opponent (or yourself) breaks, and the rack of balls barely moves.. leaves the balls in a loose cluster.. we say "Thanks for leaving me this here dirt pile.." or "I left you a dirt pile to cleanup.."
Thank you for sharing. FYI, I just added the following to the glossary:

dirt pile: loose cluster of balls left behind after the break of a "slug rack" (e.g., He left a real "dirt pile" to clean up after that break.).

Regards,
Dave
 

mnotdun

AzB Silver Member
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Thank you for sharing. FYI, I just added the following to the glossary:

dirt pile: loose cluster of balls left behind after the break of a "slug rack" (e.g., He left a real "dirt pile" to clean up after that break.).

Regards,
Dave

good deal.. and I echo the others.. nice work puttin all this together..
 

BRussell

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When I saw this thread I thought for sure someone had bumped it to make an entry for touch of a rapist.
 

dr_dave

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nice work puttin all this together.
Thanks. I've been working on the glossary for about 15 years. It started with the glossary from my book ("The Illustrated Principles of Pool and Billiards"), and I've continued to grow it over the years, with a lot of improvements and additions in the last few months.

Regards,
Dave
 

dr_dave

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When I saw this thread I thought for sure someone had bumped it to make an entry for touch of a rapist.
Silliness like that would have no place in a Dr. Dave glossary. :grin-square:

Regards,
Dave
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
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Doc.....three things

Traffic...I'm familiar with that term at 3-cushion billiards...
..traffic is what you try to avoid...it's your cue ball running into the ball you hit before
getting to your objective off three rails...it can also the be ball hit running into the third ball
It's why a good player doesn't go the obvious way sometimes..he's avoiding the traffic.

cosmo...if you could, I'd like to see the man honored who gave rise to this term.
His name was Tommy Cosmo, a stand-up comedian who could run a 100 at 14.1....
...he actually knocked Jimmy Moore out of a straight pool tournament once.
In an exhibition, he would set up the nine balls so a stop shot on every one would run
the table....hence an easy layout became known as a 'cosmo'...
..however, Tommy would do a ballet dance while he did the run.

Double...I've been to the UK many times...I've only heard 'double' to mean our 'bank'.
...so I asked Willie Thorne what you call a double bank...he didn't know..:rolleyes:
..but a three in the side is known as a 'cocked hat double'...:eek:
So I asked him what you call a four or five in the corner..he said they didn't do things like that...:)
 

J0HN0

Registered
When I saw this thread I thought for sure someone had bumped it to make an entry for touch of a rapist.

To be honest I half expected to see the same.

A good resource thanks Dr Dave.

On a completely different note (and apologies to all for the none pool related reading time expended) but Mr MNOTDUN if that's your car in the gif it's a thing of beauty.
 

J0HN0

Registered
Hello again Dr Dave.

On snooker tables the line drawn across the table through the head spot (the head string) is usually referred to as the baulk line (pronounced balk as in the game) and being "in the kitchen" usually referred to as "being in baulk".

A lot of UK guys and snooker players generally will use the same terminology when playing pool.

Best regards.
 
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