Pool ball collecting.

Rubik's Cube

Pool ball collector.
Silver Member
These rather unpretentious-looking balls were advertised as being glow-in-the-dark. They are not actually luminescent, alas, requiring some sort of special lighting to achieve the desired effect.

Still a nice set nonetheless. :)

2w6gy03.jpg
 

K2Kraze

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The Aramith glow in the dark pool set huh, Rubik's? I was wondering when someone would show those off :)

Comparing them to the non-glow ball sets, how would you say the actual finish, feel and individual weight of the balls measure up? Interesting ball colors.

Perhaps these were the historical inspiration behind the infamous TV ball sets with distinguishing colors :)



ON A SIDE NOTE, since no one else has mentioned this (yet) I see that you tend to arrange your balls in their boxes for the photographer in a unique pattern [most] of the time. I haven't been able to detect or decipher the numbering code (yet) but surely there is some story waiting for discovery here. Or did the photographer's assistant toss them together haphazardly and they were left as we see them?

Not only a ball collector but a descendant of the famed mathematician Leonardo of Pisa!

I knew it!


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K2Kraze

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Speaking of ball tray LAYOUTS - here's an interesting one using the Aramith Tournaments.

Photogenic, aren't they?

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Anything catch the eye?


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BmoreMoney

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ah, the Aramith Harlequin set. Promoted as the "Family Card Playing Games" on the box and throughout their unique rule set :)

Here is an excerpt from the actual rule set....which they touted having over 30 new playing games and perhaps the first "new" pool games created in the past 75 years.

"Family Card Pool Games are family games for all ages, played on any pocket pool table of any dimension using specially designed pool balls, playing cards, dice and the Family Card Pool Games rules. Family Card Pool Games are exciting ways for families to enjoy activities together, without computers or TV screens. For those in the family not yet old enough to actually shoot the pool ball, these junior players can handle the playing cards, roll the dice, keep score and surely help develop the best game strategies."

Without further adieu, here are my Aramith Harlequins...
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K


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Cards...... Dice... Is it good for some good ole gambling? Kids too????? Lol
 

BmoreMoney

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
These rather unpretentious-looking balls were advertised as being glow-in-the-dark. They are not actually luminescent, alas, requiring some sort of special lighting to achieve the desired effect.

Still a nice set nonetheless. :)

2w6gy03.jpg

O remember these!!! The Blacklight table at the pool hall!! The hottest, most F'd up girls used to play here. I love these and remember it ALL WELL!
 

WildWing

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
History.

Interesting if it's about something we actually have an "interest" in 😁

Billiard balls for example.

In the late 1930s before WW II, a brilliant German chemist named Doctor Koebner was working for a German chemical company that went by the name Raschig, and it's been documented that he developed the phenolic process.

A long story shortened, Dr. Koebner was Jewish and wanted to escape Hitler's Germany as well as the assured persecution of the Jewish People. It was miraculously "arranged" that he, along with his guarded formula, went to work for the England based Composition Billiard Ball Supply Co. Ltd until his death in 1949. Composition subsequently licensed the phenolic technology to the Hyatt Ball Co in Albany, N.Y. in the 1960s to produce balls using this process, which later became the Albany Billiard Ball Company. It's worth remembering (I believe) that Hyatt was the original manufacturing company responsible for creating the Brunswick Centennials. Hyatt, then Albany BBC, remained the only U.S. billiard ball manufacturer until it folded in 1986.

It gets more interesting - quickly.

When the German company Raschig went out of the ball business, Saluc (maker of Aramith balls since 1923) purchased its production equipment and their phenolic resin formulas - because Raschig's formulation was, in their opinion and testing, vastly superior to their own. And Saluc needed to be competitive with Composition and Hyatt or be faced with an untimely demise.

Fast forward a few decades..... Saluc was purchased by Simonis - yes, that Simonis (THE billiard table cloth/textiles manufacturer since 1660) in 2012.

So ---- what's the big picture?

Raschig had the best phenolic formula. Which Saluc acquired (think Aramith) when they (Raschig) folded.

That formula, along with it's creator, made its way to Hyatt/Albany BBC. Saluc's competitor.

They both - supposedly - had the same FORMULA.

The finishing processes of course were vastly different I presume, but it's still a somewhat fascinating story ----- and to own a set of Raschig balls as well as Hyatt's, Brunswick's and Aramith balls side by side and play them all while imagining Dr Koebner travels and travails, is a privilege not taken lightly, I assure you 😁

Here are the Raschig balls I was fortunate enough to acquire recently from my friend Mark at Pool Table Magic. Thank you again, Mark. I will tend to them diligently until the next owner takes over in about 5 decades :)

View attachment 418903

Hi Rubik's and K2. I posted earlier a nice set of Hyatt Vitallites, and this post caught my attention. The cue ball in K2's post is a plain dot cue ball. I can't tell if it's a blue dot or a black dot.

But it got me thinking about the early to mid 70s, when the blue circle cue balls contained in the Brunswick (Centennial) sets started to wear out. Largely, pool room owners replaced the blue circle cue balls with the blue dot cue balls, I think, manufactured by Hyatt, which at the time still made the Centennial set, as well as others. Why? I think, because the blue circle was not much sold as a stand-alone cue ball, or rarely, just like today. So, I remember playing a lot in the 70s with the Centennial set, but with a blue dot cue ball, rather than a blue circle cue ball.

So, to make a long story short, here's to the lowly blue dot cue ball, still manufactured, of course by the modern day Aramith. However, it still maintains a similar look that it did in the 70s. Here's a picture of my modern blue dot cue ball, next to the red circle cue ball. The blue dot, as you can see, is much more opaque, much like it was in the 70s.

Anyhow, this is a great thread, just thought I'd throw in another tidbit.

All the best,
WW
 

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Rubik's Cube

Pool ball collector.
Silver Member
Good evening, K2K. Those Aramith Tournaments are superb, right up there with my all-time favourite looking balls. And a magic number square always catches my eye. Nicely done, sir! :)

Good evening, Wild Wing. Beautiful cueballs, sir. Many thanks for sharing the photographs, your contributions to the thread are always most welcome.

Good evening, BMM. Glad to bring back some happy memories, sir.
 

K2Kraze

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Hi Rubik's and K2. I posted earlier a nice set of Hyatt Vitallites, and this post caught my attention. The cue ball in K2's post is a plain dot cue ball. I can't tell if it's a blue dot or a black dot.



But it got me thinking about the early to mid 70s, when the blue circle cue balls contained in the Brunswick (Centennial) sets started to wear out. Largely, pool room owners replaced the blue circle cue balls with the blue dot cue balls, I think, manufactured by Hyatt, which at the time still made the Centennial set, as well as others. Why? I think, because the blue circle was not much sold as a stand-alone cue ball, or rarely, just like today. So, I remember playing a lot in the 70s with the Centennial set, but with a blue dot cue ball, rather than a blue circle cue ball.



So, to make a long story short, here's to the lowly blue dot cue ball, still manufactured, of course by the modern day Aramith. However, it still maintains a similar look that it did in the 70s. Here's a picture of my modern blue dot cue ball, next to the red circle cue ball. The blue dot, as you can see, is much more opaque, much like it was in the 70s.



Anyhow, this is a great thread, just thought I'd throw in another tidbit.



All the best,

WW



The Blue Dot and Blue Circle cue balls were the ones I played back in the mid to later 70's as well. I often take one of the blue girls out for a match and see what she's got. Fond memories indeed.

Thank you for posting and sharing your blues :)

Here is one of the oldest I have and she plays like new. A tad grimy it looks like from the 50 years in a smoky pool SD pool hall :)

21db42b7ce389f167e101574ffaadf95.jpg
 
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K2Kraze

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
You guys had me thinking of older cue balls, so I gathered a few and had a quickie photo shoot....

a5dcc429504a3fd21a5f4a8cc9e8a2b1.jpg




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K2Kraze

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
And the old school vs the new school balls having a showing...

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Rubik's Cube

Pool ball collector.
Silver Member
I've never seen such a ball, either, Mr Bond.

A very interesting find, indeed, sir. Possibly French or Dutch themed, depending on which way up one views the cueball of course!
 

Mr. Bond

Orbis Non Sufficit
Gold Member
Silver Member
No, sir, I have not seen that one before. Interesting!

Would you happen to have any info on this mystery ball and perhaps are just teasing us with another ball quiz? :)

I've never seen such a ball, either, Mr Bond.

A very interesting find, indeed, sir. Possibly French or Dutch themed, depending on which way up one views the cueball of course!


Unfortunately this one really is a mystery.
It does seem to be an early plastic of some sort, so it's not crazy old, but the origin is completely unknown. Maybe as you suggested, French themed, or perhaps patriotic American from 1976 ? Maybe even a special order. I just don't know. Humbug.
 

alphadog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In my opinion,the blue circle takes running english better then the red circle or red triangle. The black citcle and blue dot seem inert,meaning they dont react to either draw or follow well. The red circle draws well but doesnt take follow as well as the blue.
That red triangle draws like crazy but wont follow.
I know cueballs are supposed to match their set. Maybe it is from years of playing wornout mismatched balls that I have these opinions. Right or wrong, I still prefer a blue circle. Oh and eff the measles and or milk cueballs.
Barbox cueballs arent worth discussing.
 
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