Pool Knowledge: What's the last thing you learned?

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As a beginner, we're constantly learning new things. ''As advanced players, we assume that there isn't a whole lot left to learn'' and we mostly focus on mastering execution. With that being said, when is the last time you learned something new that instantly made you improve? What was it?

For me, the last major thing I learned was a few months ago related to the physics of a rolling cue ball. It was sparked by a post by Tin Man about how high to hit the cue ball when using follow. Then Patrick Johnson pointed out that you can hit the cue ball a certain distance about center (3/5ths, I think) to get an instant rolling cue ball. These two bits of info have really accelerated my game and changed my style a lot. Thanks fellas.

Now I'm always wondering...what is left to learn? Hopefully sharing each other's latest discoveries will help.

If you haven't learned anything new in a long time, how long has it been?
''I don't agree at all with the above line''.....
 

Sunchaser

Belgian Malinois
Silver Member
I learned that everytime i put two racks together the third one is easy to screw up. I start thinking about it being a 3 pack situation instead of focusing on the ball at hand, and 3 balls ahead. Screws me up almost every time. I suck though.
 

7stud

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I learned that everytime i put two racks together the third one is easy to screw up. I start thinking about it being a 3 pack situation instead of focusing on the ball at hand, and 3 balls ahead. Screws me up almost every time. I suck though.
Well, check out John Morra at Turning Stone this weekend when it was hill-hill. Click on "Watch on Facebook" and advance to 4:14:20:

 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
bbb,
I've been playing about every sucking day for about a yr now, but kept at it, and each mth I'm gettin a little more back, I've had my moments.

Find an instructor that's able to watch you play, and critique your actions.
I gave lessons 20 hrs a MONTH (not a week), for ten years (mostly one on one) this is what I learned.
When I had a new student for an hour lesson, our first lesson was always 1 1/2 hrs, why?
I found this important.
Once I learned about the student/person/background/work/etc, it help immensely.
I had to know FIRST, how that student (thinks) thru work/life/and play, that was key.
I found it impossible to explain a concept to a person, if I didn't know how they thought/rolled/processed life.
An example: I once gave a lesson to commercial airline pilot.
Since his approach to the shot was ''all over the place'' I explained it, compared it to landing a jet.
I asked him.....Do you come in from a 90 degree angle and quickly land, or? Do you approach the air strip from a distance and land.
He got it immediately.
I usually would find 2 major concerns and worked on that Only.
Yah gotta crawl before you walk in life.
You've chosen thee most difficult game in the world.
It'll take allot of work/time and stick to it Ness to improve, it's usually NEVER comes quickly, the games too precise/difficult.
Thru experience, I found it takes about 3 months to incorporate/change a bad habit, till you stop thinking about it.
Now if you play only once a week, that won't work.
 
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Jack Fate

New member
The vision center video that Bob J posted a couple days ago helped me . Being ambidextrous it was hard to absolutely trust what I thought was my dominant eye and how my head is alined . I now have faith and trust in my shot focus .
Now when my neck stops hurting it will all be worth it. ; )
 

JusticeNJ

Four Points/Steel Joints
Silver Member
Head / eyes / feet being in the right place are the biggest factor in whether I make or miss a ball. Sounds rudimentary but, big revelation for me.
 

dquarasr

Registered
bbb,
I've been playing about every sucking for about a yr now, but kept at it, and each mth I'm gettin a little more back, I've had my moments.

Find an instructor that's able to watch you play, and critique your actions.
I gave lessons 20 hrs a week for ten years (mostly one on one) this is what I learned.
When I had a new student for an hour lesson, our first lesson was always 1 1/2 hrs, why?
I found this important.
Once I learned about the student/person/background/work/etc, it help immensely.
I had to know FIRST, how that student (thinks) thru work/life/and play, that was key.
I found it impossible to explain a concept to a person, if I didn't know how they thought/rolled/processed life.
An example: I once gave a lesson to commercial airline pilot.
Since his approach to the shot was ''all over the place'' I explained it, compared it to landing a jet.
I asked him.....Do you come in from a 90 degree angle and quickly land, or? Do you approach the air strip from a distance and land.
He got it immediately.
I usually would find 2 major concerns and worked on that Only.
Yah gotta crawl before you walk in life.
You've chosen thee most difficult game in the world.
It'll take allot of work/time and stick to it Ness to improve, it's usually NEVER comes quickly, the games too precise/difficult.
Thru experience, I found it takes about 3 months to incorporate/change a bad habit, till you stop thinking about it.
Now if you play only once a week, that won't work.
Interesting. I’ve instructed about 100 students in high performance driving, how to drive their sports cars on a race track. I only introduced one or two topics per session. Any more was lost. Best student I ever had was a 747 pilot. Got stuff right away; was willing to listen (key!!!!!) and apply. Progressed VERY quickly.

In answer to the original question, three recent major finds: keeping my elbow in line with my head has improved accuracy dramatically; stroke timing; and I’ve been popping up unknowingly as I make contact with the CB. The first and third easily found via recording myself; very enlightening.
 

Nyquil

Active member
Good thread. For me it's been breaking on 9 ball. Watching the matches on TV a lot of players really sledge hammer the ball. I was getting wild results this way and sent the cue ball flying off the table a few times. I was also scratching a lot. I decided to dial power down and break with an open bridge. I can make the wing ball almost everytime and usually get good shape on the one. It took a lot of practice messing around with where to place the cue ball, power, and placement cue tip on contact. You need way less power than you think in 9 ball to get a real good break/spread.
 

tomatoshooter

Well-known member
Good thread. For me it's been breaking on 9 ball. Watching the matches on TV a lot of players really sledge hammer the ball. I was getting wild results this way and sent the cue ball flying off the table a few times. I was also scratching a lot. I decided to dial power down and break with an open bridge. I can make the wing ball almost everytime and usually get good shape on the one. It took a lot of practice messing around with where to place the cue ball, power, and placement cue tip on contact. You need way less power than you think in 9 ball to get a real good break/spread.
Yeah, I've found that precision and control beat max power. I still try to up the power so my 75% controlled power will increase.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Invest $75 in the book "Play Great Pool" by Mark Wilson. Read the book twice. Then video three practice sessions a week for six months straight to understand what you are doing correct and incorrect. Review each video session prior to your next practice session. Incorporate the changes that you make from your practice into competitive pool sessions. Within six months of this disciplined approach you could be a 20% better player at minimum.
After six months, re- read the book again, confirm any changes that you have made in the first six months, make sure they are permanent changes, now look for any other areas to incorporate into your game, continue the video practice and review sessions. After one full year of this I am a 25% better player than anytime in my life and I am 68. I can hang with any 600 rated player today.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
bbb,
I've been playing about every sucking for about a yr now, but kept at it, and each mth I'm gettin a little more back, I've had my moments.

Find an instructor that's able to watch you play, and critique your actions.
I gave lessons 20 hrs a week for ten years (mostly one on one) this is what I learned.
When I had a new student for an hour lesson, our first lesson was always 1 1/2 hrs, why?
I found this important.
Once I learned about the student/person/background/work/etc, it help immensely.
I had to know FIRST, how that student (thinks) thru work/life/and play, that was key.
I found it impossible to explain a concept to a person, if I didn't know how they thought/rolled/processed life.
An example: I once gave a lesson to commercial airline pilot.
Since his approach to the shot was ''all over the place'' I explained it, compared it to landing a jet.
I asked him.....Do you come in from a 90 degree angle and quickly land, or? Do you approach the air strip from a distance and land.
He got it immediately.
I usually would find 2 major concerns and worked on that Only.
Yah gotta crawl before you walk in life.
You've chosen thee most difficult game in the world.
It'll take allot of work/time and stick to it Ness to improve, it's usually NEVER comes quickly, the games too precise/difficult.
Thru experience, I found it takes about 3 months to incorporate/change a bad habit, till you stop thinking about it.
Now if you play only once a week, that won't work.
Care to elaborate?
I learned today that i suck at pool ….😢
island drive thank you for your post.... (y)
in the scheme of things i am no where close to a 700 fargo player
to me thats where good starts
i have taken many lessons and am applying what i have been instructed
after cataract surgery recently
my eyesight has changed and i am not seeing the balls the same
i am missing balls i would not have missed in the past
i was frustrated yesterday
but
i am the type to persevere and will keep working on my game to improve...:)
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thx bbb, I did change my original post, from 20 hrs a wk to 20 hrs a mth. Oops.
If your one to keep at it, persevere works.
Also, if your consistently doing the same thing wrong all the time, like overcutting a little left/right on long straight in shots that's a good thing, why?
Because a fundamental error is consistently wrong and very seeable/fixable to an experienced instructor.
 

philly

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I am a feel player.
The only time I use diamonds is when I imagine where I want the cue ball to hit on the rail
as it travels into shape.
I find I am playing my best and most confidently when I am "digging" into the cue ball (slight elbow drop?) if that makes any sense.
It is about the follow through at contact and the solidity through contact even on softer shots.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yesterday, fixed my ''walk up'' to the shot and my weight thru the shot, took about a yr, why? because after quitting to raise my daughters, the game took a back seat, but Now/yesterday, I had a hard time quitting why?.
Game jumped a ball, and I remember now Why they called me Bigfoot, had my foot work wrong, and I do have big feet, I'm 6 6.
Pros Never stop learning....I'm finally glad I've put in my time.
But such a blanket statement you made I found wrong.
I also competed in Olympic time trials, and I've learned, learning Never stops, unless the man in the mirror has all the answers, she did and I left.
 

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SmoothStroke

Swim for the win.
Silver Member
I've learned , you don't know what you don't know until you know it.
Once I knew it, I realized I still knew nothing, until I practiced what I didn't know repeatedly.
Now I have to forget what I thought I knew , and remember what I didn't know, and repeat it when called upon, and I didn't know any of this either.
So I've learned nothing, but at least I know it. Pool and life are tough, in that order.

My wife says " Hon" you're overdosing on pool and fishing, you must eat something.
I say to her,,I know,,I know,,I know,,I know,,I know, after I read page 1,000,000 on aiming.
I tell her I know everything, and she agrees, just ask her.
The more I think about it , I may have learned never to say " I know "
 
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