Practice from the chair

3RAILKICK

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just thinking out loud...

We get one chance to make the shot in a real game.


Practicing, I set up the same shot and shoot it numerous times. Set it up, shoot, evaluate, make changes if missed, or if made, attempt to successfully repeat the shot....angle, speed, english...etc. Often, with a bunch of other ob available to respot....basically staying at the table.



Any merit in resetting the shot, then returning to the chair...??



From the chair, as in a game, approach the table, and take on the shot that 'opponent' left. One chance to make it.


..just random thought about how to change up practice routine, to more game like conditions...:confused:


...is this just a way to practice missing, as in a game, without fine tuning the probability of making the shot?:eek:
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Never heard of anyone doing this and I can't really see the benefit personally. Setting the same shot over and over however is extremely beneficial if done correctly..ie stay down and track the object ball and see where in the pocket it hit... Was it where you intended, is the cue ball where you intended, was your pace good. Then you should get back up. IMO it is the most effective way to take all the information in and you learn quicker from it. Then basically repeat. Starting from scratch, approach the shot, reset your stance and walk in etc. If sitting down helps you completely reset then go for it, but in most cases and mine especially it would be time wasted that I could hit another shot.
 

Donny Lutz

Ferrule Cat
Silver Member
return to chair

Never heard of anyone doing this and I can't really see the benefit personally. Setting the same shot over and over however is extremely beneficial if done correctly..ie stay down and track the object ball and see where in the pocket it hit... Was it where you intended, is the cue ball where you intended, was your pace good. Then you should get back up. IMO it is the most effective way to take all the information in and you learn quicker from it. Then basically repeat. Starting from scratch, approach the shot, reset your stance and walk in etc. If sitting down helps you completely reset then go for it, but in most cases and mine especially it would be time wasted that I could hit another shot.

I think the idea is that in competition you never get to repeat shots (as in drills), so why practice only repeated drills?

Pro basketball players practice free throws by shooting them over and over, but the best shooting coaches also have them shoot two free throws and then take a break before shooting two more, - as would happen in actual competition.

Drills are how you learn to repeat correct mechanics and gain confidence in specific shots. But in competition, you may have to shoot "cold" or under a different kind of pressure...so one might try what the OP is doing. Makes sense to me...
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't think it's possible to actually imitate playing against someone because regardless of what you do, you know in your head that you're not really playing against anyone. Your mindset will be different.

There are benefits to practicing alone and there are benefits to playing against someone. I think it's better to try to find time to do both.
 

Ratta

Hearing the balls.....
Silver Member
I don't think it's possible to actually imitate playing against someone because regardless of what you do, you know in your head that you're not really playing against anyone. Your mindset will be different.

There are benefits to practicing alone and there are benefits to playing against someone. I think it's better to try to find time to do both.

Fran was faster- :)
Hope you re doing great Fran-

As usual- wise words Mylady ^^

lg
Ingo
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think the idea is that in competition you never get to repeat shots (as in drills), so why practice only repeated drills?

Pro basketball players practice free throws by shooting them over and over, but the best shooting coaches also have them shoot two free throws and then take a break before shooting two more, - as would happen in actual competition.

Drills are how you learn to repeat correct mechanics and gain confidence in specific shots. But in competition, you may have to shoot "cold" or under a different kind of pressure...so one might try what the OP is doing. Makes sense to me...
Sitting down and getting back up can't recreate an in match situation. You can't recreate the pressure and you can't recreate playing cold.... Unless you sit there for 5 minutes.... Which no one is going to do in practise. All it does is gets you familiar with how to sit down...

As you state, drills promote confidence in a particular shot that you've practised. That's all it takes. Confidence whether you are on a roll or coming in cold. If you're confident in the shot you will have better success.
 

ENGLISH!

Banned
Silver Member
I tend to agree with those that say that you can not re-create the realism.

However, if you do as you suggest & if you miss the shot you then take $10 or $20 dollars & either tip the bartender or throw it in a video poker machine or a Juke Box, it might start getting close at some point.:wink:

I suggest giving it to the bar tender.

Best 2 Ya,
 

DrCue'sProtege

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you do practice one shot remember you cant practice it any longer than 15-20 minutes. That's how long the mind can focus and concentrate. At least according to some instructors on here.

Most outstanding players practiced 6-8 hours a day at some point. They must have never slept if they took a break every 15-20 minutes.

r/DCP
 

Donny Lutz

Ferrule Cat
Silver Member
no such claim

Sitting down and getting back up can't recreate an in match situation. You can't recreate the pressure and you can't recreate playing cold.... Unless you sit there for 5 minutes.... Which no one is going to do in practise. All it does is gets you familiar with how to sit down...

As you state, drills promote confidence in a particular shot that you've practised. That's all it takes. Confidence whether you are on a roll or coming in cold. If you're confident in the shot you will have better success.

I didn't claim that any form of practice is the same as playing in competition.

No, you don't have to "sit there for 5 minutes"...you practice other shots in between.

Shooting the same shot over and over is not the same as playing competition, but it's an important part of improving, is it not?

I remember one specific time when I repeated a shot twenty times (successfully) in practice. Then, an hour later, I faced the same shot in a game and missed it. One must be able to execute "cold" as well as in dead stroke. So wouldn't taking breaks between specific practice shots make sense?

It's the ability to re-focus on a particular shot that matters, not just how many times you've made that shot in the past. You're absolutely right about the pressure of competition, but does that mean that some practice routines are worthless?
 

Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
No they didn't Mike. Most of them practiced "playing" for at least 6-8 hours. Real practice is doing something you can observe, measure, and make corrections. This is how the Dutch, German and Chinese players train. You can 'practice playing' 24/7/365 and you may or may not get statistically significantly better...because you're just grooving in poor fundamentals. A pro can make any 'bad habit' work for them if they work at it enough. That's not how I want to practice, nor how I would want to teach someone.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

If you do practice one shot remember you cant practice it any longer than 15-20 minutes. That's how long the mind can focus and concentrate. At least according to some instructors on here.

Most outstanding players practiced 6-8 hours a day at some point. They must have never slept if they took a break every 15-20 minutes.

r/DCP
 
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