Question about shot clock at US Open 9ball and World Pool Series

ctran

You watch me.
Silver Member
I wonder if there are shot clocks at outside tables for the 2 events.

There are clocks for TV tables, but I noticed on live streams of outside table, players seem to take a lot more time to shoot.

I am curious because I think a professional event without shot clock is a joke, many players have all the time in the world to walk around table until they feel they cannot miss... boring to watch; and it minimizes the difference in speed.

appreciate your inputs.
 

vapoolplayer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I wonder if there are shot clocks at outside tables for the 2 events.

There are clocks for TV tables, but I noticed on live streams of outside table, players seem to take a lot more time to shoot.

I am curious because I think a professional event without shot clock is a joke, many players have all the time in the world to walk around table until they feel they cannot miss... boring to watch; and it minimizes the difference in speed.

appreciate your inputs.

I’ll jump on the must have a shot clock train when professional pool players can earn a decent living without having to win 10 or more tournaments a year.

As it is right now, let them take all the time in the world to make sure they don’t miss, as most of them aren’t exactly living very well.

And before anyone chimes in with “shot clock makes it more exciting and more people will watch,”........that’s been done and it hasn’t changed anything.

Figure out a way to pay them more, or stfu and let them play whatever speed they want is my opinion. Live feeds already only get 300-1000 viewers, so it’s not going to change things if a few people don’t tune in because they want to see faster play.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
I wonder if there are shot clocks at outside tables for the 2 events.

There are clocks for TV tables, but I noticed on live streams of outside table, players seem to take a lot more time to shoot.

I am curious because I think a professional event without shot clock is a joke, many players have all the time in the world to walk around table until they feel they cannot miss... boring to watch; and it minimizes the difference in speed.

appreciate your inputs.

A shot clock at every table implies a ref to man it, also.
Better they save that expense and sweeten the prize money instead.
 

ctran

You watch me.
Silver Member
i think there were no shot clock on outside tables at the US Open

and the WPS rule states that shot clock will be 30sec if one player claim other player to be slow-playing

no offense but I think players can work the shot clock by themselves, like in chess.

just my opinion, because I think pool is boring to watch now. a lot players shooting at a fast speed, which is entertaining to watch and they feel comfy with... while a lot more just shoot slow because they want to disturb opponents' speed, or they are truly slow players... i believe in the former.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
A shot clock at every table implies a ref to man it, ...
Unless they use a chess clock as has been both mentioned and implemented several times. It is known to work. If the player wants to spend five minutes on a really hard shot, he can, but the total time is limited.
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
I always advocate for a shot bank, not unlike chess clock.

You start off with 60 in your shot bank, and you have a 30 second shot clock. Any time not used is added to your shot bank (say no more than 3 minutes). If you take longer than 30 seconds, then start drawing from your shot bank.

Its probably trivial to implement as a smart phone app.

i think there were no shot clock on outside tables at the US Open

and the WPS rule states that shot clock will be 30sec if one player claim other player to be slow-playing

no offense but I think players can work the shot clock by themselves, like in chess.

just my opinion, because I think pool is boring to watch now. a lot players shooting at a fast speed, which is entertaining to watch and they feel comfy with... while a lot more just shoot slow because they want to disturb opponents' speed, or they are truly slow players... i believe in the former.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Unless they use a chess clock as has been both mentioned and implemented several times. It is known to work. If the player wants to spend five minutes on a really hard shot, he can, but the total time is limited.

I always advocate for a shot bank, not unlike chess clock.

You start off with 60 in your shot bank, and you have a 30 second shot clock. Any time not used is added to your shot bank (say no more than 3 minutes). If you take longer than 30 seconds, then start drawing from your shot bank.

Its probably trivial to implement as a smart phone app.

Hmmm....something for me to ponder on...especially the shot bank idea.
....do I have a time limit? :smile:
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The old straight pool matches on network TV from the 60s had the players almost running around the table. Is that how they normally played? Or were they instructed by the networks?

Put me down for a 20 sec shot clock on every televised/streamed match. Pool is so boring, even for us die hards, when the players are slow.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
The old straight pool matches on network TV from the 60s had the players almost running around the table. Is that how they normally played? Or were they instructed by the networks?

Put me down for a 20 sec shot clock on every televised/streamed match. Pool is so boring, even for us die hards, when the players are slow.

I find speed pool boring also...there has to be some leeway given for clever solutions
when trapped.
I liked the one minute shot clock for one pocket.
...and I think forty seconds is good for rotation.
...not everybody is a Butera.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The old straight pool matches on network TV from the 60s had the players almost running around the table. Is that how they normally played? Or were they instructed by the networks? ...
They didn't seem hurried when I saw them. Occasionally there would be problem shots that they spent more time on but usually they knew their patterns and what they needed to do and they got on with it. I think a 150-point match was expected to take about 2 hours or less.

The producers edited the tape down anyway.
 

sciarco

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i like the speed of Earl Shaw Morris, slow players are boring 30 to 40 seconds is good enough .
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
Your per shot time limit is going to be whatever time you accumulate in the shot bank, up to 3 minutes.

9-ball break and run scenario (10 shots) should take no more than 6 minutes.

A player averaging 30 seconds per shot will accumulate 0 seconds in the shot bank. So, all he has is two 30 seconds extensions (60 seconds)

A player averaging 15 seconds per shot will accumulate 120 seconds (two minutes) for the first 8-balls. He can use up to 3 minutes on a single shot (120 seconds accumulated, plus 60 seconds provided by the extensions)

Tournaments are a test of pool skills. We currently have a situation in competitive pool where slow play is unchecked, and actually rewarded; use your full 30 seconds on every shot whether you need it or not. We don't have anything in place to encourage quick play, which I believe is also measurable skill in pool.

Hmmm....something for me to ponder on...especially the shot bank idea.
....do I have a time limit? :smile:
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Your per shot time limit is going to be whatever time you accumulate in the shot bank, up to 3 minutes. ...
A major problem of the shot bank is that it requires a timekeeper to hit a switch for each shot. It also presumably requires some kind of warning buzzer or announcement of "10 seconds".
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
You time starts when your opponent sit down and toggles the shot bank clock. Vice versa you're still on the clock until you return back to your seat.

With today's technology, its pretty easy to program a 10 second warning or a warning you're now drawing into your time bank.

A major problem of the shot bank is that it requires a timekeeper to hit a switch for each shot. It also presumably requires some kind of warning buzzer or announcement of "10 seconds".
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
You time starts when your opponent sit down and toggles the shot bank clock. Vice versa you're still on the clock until you return back to your seat.

With today's technology, its pretty easy to program a 10 second warning or a warning you're now drawing into your time bank.

Do you get 30 seconds per inning or per shot?
 
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