Shaft Wax ( Discussing methods of shaft maintenace )

Ak Guy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Many ways

I view shaft maintenance kind of like gun cleaning. More then one method produces good results.

I try to keep my hands clean and wipe my cue down with a white micro fleece cloth after I am done playing and during play if the shaft feels like it needs it.

I have tried different products and methods and have done away with wax on my shaft, but use it on the cues butt as I use wrap less cues.

I prefer to use denatured alchohol on a Magic Eraser pad to clean a shaft if it starts feeling scroungy.

For sealing the wood I like the acrylic sealer/finish that Pool Dog sells. It seems to produce a harder and more durable finish then the wax I have used.

I apply 3 light coats with a paper towel with an hour drying time between coats followed by a burnish with a leather pad.

My goal for shaft maintenance is to produce a good feeling shaft and not to change the dimensions of the shaft in the process so my shaft lasts for many years.
 

john coloccia

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Got a 40 year old DPK that didn't ....

Back before there was money to be made on shaft conditioning products, that's all most of us did. Occasionally, someone would rub it with a little scotchbrite, though I always thought it was counterproductive. I think Mizerak suggested lemon oil or lighter fluid to help the shaft "break in", but I could be remembering that wrong.

Incidentally, I'm starting to dig thinned satin lacquer followed up with a light wipe sanding with 1000 grit or so. I'm going to try a sanding sealer next. May be even better.

It's generally sweat that will destroy a nitro lacquer finish. Depends a lot on your body chemistry. Some guys, like me, hardly attack it at all. Other guys can practically wipe the lacquer off with a sweaty t-shirt.
 
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M.G.

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Recently I've used Macadamia oil. Let dry for a long time.
Does not yellow the shaft as linseed would. Love the feel.

On top the Renaissance and you're good.
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
Cues

Back before there was money to be made on shaft conditioning products, that's all most of us did. Occasionally, someone would rub it with a little scotchbrite, though I always thought it was counterproductive. I think Mizerak suggested lemon oil or lighter fluid to help the shaft "break in", but I could be remembering that wrong.

Incidentally, I'm starting to dig thinned satin lacquer followed up with a light wipe sanding with 1000 grit or so. I'm going to try a sanding sealer next. May be even better.

It's generally sweat that will destroy a nitro lacquer finish. Depends a lot on your body chemistry. Some guys, like me, hardly attack it at all. Other guys can practically wipe the lacquer off with a sweaty t-shirt.


HI
I started this thread to learn how to do a better job on shaft maintenance .....
Personally I don't want anyone taking any amount of wood off of any of the shafts I own.
My hands sweat allot and where I live is a dry climate.
I don't know things about wood like some or most cue makers and I am not a chemist.

Everything I do is trial and error.
Allot of suggestions I have received on this topic was by PM because members don't want to argue over what works good for them .

Everything I suggest I have been done on one of my own shafts or test maple wood shafts .

With all this said I want to take the best care possible with the shafts I own with in reason .
I am also a want a be cue maker and cue repair person and doing a good or the best job means something to me personally .

If there is a technic where I can keep the wood healthy and smooth and slick without sanding on it and without it costing me a fortune then that's what I want to do .

I like using the lighter fluid , It has worked better then anything I have tried so far.
IMO a lathe is best tool that could be used to apply the lighter fluid sealer or helps seal the shaft .
I turn my lathe to as fast as it will go and soak a blue paper towel with lighter fluid and get after it and I will do that over and over for 30 40 minutes and burnish the lighter fluid and then wax.
The lighter fluid does evaporate and it does contain Paraffin oil and I believe its the paraffin oil is what is what is sealing the pours in the wood .. ( theory )
The shaft doesn't smell like lighter fluid and I have zero issue with the raising the grain.
If the grain is raised then its burnished back down ...






I sure don't want to get side ways with anyone over this thread, I am only here to
learn and relay the results of what I have tried .

On hot days where my hands sweat allot Its almost impossible for me to play pool without using a glove.

The friction of the shaft across my bridge hand can be noticed because you can se it pulling on the skin of my hand .
My game goes down the toilet on the spot.
I have no choice but to have to address that issue on hot days ..

I also have to wonder about keeping the shaft wood from not drying out and becoming brittle over a 40 or 50 year time period .

Thank you for your input
 

speedy5963

speedy5963
Silver Member
use micro grit cloth....not sand paper.....much better if your having to do that for a cleaning than sandpaper....the micro grit is as perfect an even grit texture as could be, really great stuff, its washable and lasts long time believe it or not....small precuts are about 40 for a double set....cheaper if you spend more and buy full sheets, more up front but savings because of bulk

A buddy of mine uses the really fine micro cloth, I have not, I've stuck to really fine papers and it has worked, will have to try the fine clothes though sometime. Just time and care like many say does a lot for a shaft, keep it clean, wiped down and burnished does a lot.

Mortuary Mike! What's up bud, Richard just got back in the states a few days ago so hopefully I'll be seeing him soon when he gets back her to CA. Al is well, I will give him your regards, family all good as can be, I hope things are well with you! Probably be planning a trip out to Reno sometime this summer, will have to catch up when I'm up North!
 

john coloccia

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I sure don't want to get side ways with anyone over this thread, I am only here to
learn and relay the results of what I have tried .

No worries, Mike! I'm just killing some time trying to decide if I should just use a sledgehammer to beat my Jointer/Planar into tiny cast iron morsels, or if I can somehow figure out a way to toss the 600lb piece of junk out my shop window. Sent ya' a pm. :)
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
Jointer planar

No worries, Mike! I'm just killing some time trying to decide if I should just use a sledgehammer to beat my Jointer/Planar into tiny cast iron morsels, or if I can somehow figure out a way to toss the 600lb piece of junk out my shop window. Sent ya' a pm. :)

You have to show the inlays you are trying to do ..
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I really like the lighter fluid on solid maple shafts then wax with that wax I sent you.
The synthetic stuff .
I get great results .....

I think Lighter fluid would void the warranty, I have no idea if it would make the shaft delaminate or not.

I just used some lighter fluid on my Predator and it seems to work without any problems. I put some on a paper towel and did a few quick scrubs up and down with a firm grip until I could feel the heat from the friction and then dried it real quick with some new paper towels and buffed it with a piece of brown paper bag.

It is all slicked up and ready for play.
 

RussPrince

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
for the last few years I've not applied any wax or finishes on my shafts. When I clean my shafts on the lathe, I always finish with a light pass with hard glass across the whole shaft. Works as good or better than any finish i've tried before. Less messy too. At the hall best results I've had are with a wet paper towel wipe down, and buff with a dry paper towel hard enough to generate a little heat. In a pinch I use the cuewiz.
 

nfuids

eh?
Silver Member
I bought Ronsonol brand lighter fluid,

I will put on a table spoon of Lighter fluid on a white paper towel and spin the shaft at hi speeds and really work the lighter fluid in until I get a glass like finish
Then I wax over it.

So you kind of polish using lighter fluid before applying the wax?

I kinda thought that lighter fluid was to help clean the shaft, but it seems I was wrong? :)
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
PM sent

So you kind of polish using lighter fluid before applying the wax?

I kinda thought that lighter fluid was to help clean the shaft, but it seems I was wrong? :)

Lighter fluid can be used as a cleaning solvent to clean your solid maple shaft .
We have one member who is using lighter fluid on a laminated shaft, but I don't know if long term cleaning with lighter fluid will or could cause delamination on laminated LD shafts .


I have my shaft in a lathe and turning it slowly to clean it.
Denatured alcohol and then lighter fluid < this is not going to make your shaft perfectly clean > but it will remove most of the dirt and chalk that is embedded into the maple shaft.
It will not remove all of the chalk color out of the shaft.
I will also turn my lathe off and wipe the shaft down with lighter fluid and a paper towel ( towel is soaked with lighter fluid ).


Once I think I have got all the dirt out of the shafts wood grain or pours then I will use more lighter fluid and burnish the shaft with lighter fluid and my lathes rotation turned to max rpm's.
I really poor the lighter fluid on and work it into the wood several times ..
Just dont friction burn your shaft or hand .

Then I will wax....

Ps sanding sealer ( Lac bug shit/ denatured alcohol will seal the shafts wood .

Lac bug shit refined then dissolved into Shellac using denatured alcohol .
Then cutting shellac 50% with denatured alcohol again will make sanding sealer.

Refined Lac bug shit = ( shellac flakes )

But is sticky and you will need to sand with 3m scotch bright pad and wax over the sanding sealer.
 
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M.G.

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Kind of liked Macadamia Nut Oil as finishing.
Does not color the shaft darker or yellower as linseed would.
Dries in ~1 day. Apply 2 coats, let fully dry, then 1 layer Renaissance on top.

Rather durable and nice.

Cheers,
M
 

Dedeye1209

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Wax paper?

Years ago, my mentor showed me how he cleaned and sealed shafts.

Scrub the shaft with a lighter fluid dampened paper towel
Allow to dry
Lightly sand with 1500 or finer sandpaper
Rub until hot with a folded piece of wax paper
Continue rubbing until shaft feels slightly sticky
Allow to cool and polish with a clean cloth

Obviously, this is much easier by spinning on a lathe. Has anyone else used the wax paper as a sealer? Is there any risk to this beyond the heating?

I've used this method for nearly 20 years without any issues. Also you can carry a folded up piece of wax paper in you bag easily.
 

Dave-Kat

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not on shafts, WP on worn, dry, frayed wraps then burnish with brown paper bag. You have a very nice stable of cues listed you own, why are you asking if the 'lighter fluid 1500gr wax paper method is ok now after 20 years ? Just curious, are your shafts getting thin ?

Take care,
-Kat,


Years ago, my mentor showed me how he cleaned and sealed shafts.

Scrub the shaft with a lighter fluid dampened paper towel
Allow to dry
Lightly sand with 1500 or finer sandpaper
Rub until hot with a folded piece of wax paper
Continue rubbing until shaft feels slightly sticky
Allow to cool and polish with a clean cloth

Obviously, this is much easier by spinning on a lathe. Has anyone else used the wax paper as a sealer? Is there any risk to this beyond the heating?

I've used this method for nearly 20 years without any issues. Also you can carry a folded up piece of wax paper in you bag easily.
 

Dedeye1209

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm very careful not to remove much wood.

I guess I was wondering if anyone else uses the WP to seal, never mind the scrub and sand. I only do that very seldom. And I recently started using a liquid shaft cleaner, which is great.

The RB shafts were pretty narrow when it came to me. The original Joss shaft is long gone (broken by me in an episode of regretful jovial stupidity), and the others are all at least 12.5. The Hurricane also came to me rather thin, and I'm investigating having an oversized 13.5 one made for it. Or possibly making it myself...

I did use the WP on a wrap a short while ago with fantastic results.

I appreciate your concern.

Brad
 

Hollismason

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I would worry about putting lighter fluid on my cue stick because if I got on a hot streak it may burst into flames.
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I ran out of my favorite cue wax and now that the warm weather is here, cannot order it.
The wax is made by Craftsman Cues, Ltd. in Birmingham, England. The long journey
to the USA takes well over a week and the wax gets ruined from being exposed to
heat during the handling and shipping that's unavoidable during the warmer weather.

Since I'm pretty fanatical about my cues, I switched brands of cue wax and started using
Renaissance Wax Polish which I had used years ago before discovering Craftsman Wax.
I regularly perform maintenance on my cues' shafts and will burnish and wax all of the shafts
at least monthly, or sooner whenever needed. Renaissance does a very good job of putting
a protective coating that renders the shafts smooth and very resistant to hand oil or sweat.

It's a little pricey but it does a very good job and anyone that's used it has never griped about
trying and using it on their pool cues. Until I get get some more Craftsman Wax, this is the best
alternative. If you maintain your cue shafts, they'll last your lifetime & likely the next owner's too.



Matt B.
 

Ironhead1970

Registered
I Use Trewax made for hardwood floors clean with isotope alcohol then 000.0b steel wool and wipe then do two to three coats of wax.
All I have are some inexpensive cues only been playing for about 6 months.
Next month I'm going to Dallas to see Randy for his 3 day class then I'm going to look into spending about $300.00 to $350.00 on a good cue.
 

j2pac

Marital Slow Learner.
Gold Member
Silver Member
I have been testing out different car waxes on some of my cue shafts.

A friend of mine made commercial car wax for years, he owned the business and was a major supplier of car waxes to all the detail shops in southern California.

He would mix up about 300 gallons of wax at a time.
he also said some of the stuff he put in his car wax was a major heath hazards and protective gear was a must.

To be 100% honest I know very little about car waxes and how to make them.
'Also I don't care for the scent of most car waxes made with natural waxes.


My understanding is there are three different natural waxes that are used to make car wax or wood waxes and they all are petro based.
From what I gather all natural waxes used on cars or wood have some kind of petroleum in them.

The three known natural waxes on cars and wood are carnauba, bee's wax and paraffin wax.

Carnauba has the highest melting point and dries the hardest over bees and paraffin waxes.
But in car waxes it seems that bees wax and paraffin wax is all used in allot of carnauba car waxes too, it is some what of a blend of the 3 waxes.
My guess is paraffin is used because its the cheapest of all three of the waxes.
By the way carnauba wax melting point is right around 170 degrees F.
bees wax is about 120 degree.

Pool cues and musical instruments kind of stand alone, I do not know of any other exotic wooden products that are made to such a high standard and have to with stand us handling it on a weekly or daily bases.

I think melting points, how hard the wax dries, how does the wax smell, how long does the wax last. and do we need to strip the old wax off before applying more wax on, and does the wax keep the shaft nice and slippery are important factors in order for us to come up with the best and most inexpensive way to maintain and protect our cue shafts.

The test
I am going to do is to use 6 different waxes on 6 different shafts and see which waxes hold up the best.
here is the brand names of the wax I plan on using.

Pro Yellow wax ( carnauba ) 14 ounce can, solid wax price is about 10 bucks
and it is petro based. And its combustible :eek:
Strong petro scent

Meguiar's synthetic paste wax , pure synthetic polymer 11 oz can solid wax , costs about 18 bucks , I have no idea if its made with any petro but it is combustible too.
pleasant scent or perfumed.

Howards Feed -N- Wax . 16 OZ its bees wax and orange oil, it is more of a liquid wax and it too is combustible.
strong orange but pleasant scent.

Cue wax is a carnauba wax it is a paste 2 ounces , 7 bucks and it is also combustible, and petro based .
Pleasant scent or perfumed .

Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish , it is a paste wax petro based and combustible. 7 ounce can is 20 bucks , I have no idea what natural wax is used in Renaissance wax. strong petro scent and it is combustible.

I am going to mix some waxes together and I have some carnauba flakes.
I will be petro base and combustible cost and scent is unknown.....


Here is a link to wiki carnauba wax, carnauba is used from car waxes to wax used on explosives to MM's candy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnauba_wax

For anyone wanting to add what waxes the use or. if there are any wax experts out there please chime in.

I also would like to publicly say thank you to the member who sent me a can of Renaissance wax. It was a extremely generous act.

Mike,
Try this...P21S. I think you can still find it on Amazon. It is a Concourse grade wax. It is a hybrid combination of Carnauba and beeswax. Apply it, give it a few minutes, and then buff it out with a CLEAN microfiber towel. The stuff isn't cheap, but there is a reason for that. ;)
Best regards.
Joe P
 
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