shafts for old cues

cuenut

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So what would you do. You buy a vintage cue that comes with 2 or more shafts, and they all have a decent amount of roll and/or are <12.5 in diameter, or both. Knowing that most potential purchasers want "very straight" and full shafts, do you leave it alone, or would you:
* Keep the fullest original and pull the collars off of the shaft and have someone, preferably the original builder, make new shafts that match,
* Keep them all original and sell with the assumption that most players nowadays will probably put an LD shaft on it anyway,
* Have an LD shaft made with the collar from the worst shaft and leave the others original,
* Some other variation of the above.
 

14.1'er

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So, you have a old cue with warped shafts, and want to sell it? This is what it sounds like to me. If so, be honest and tell the potential buyers, and let them decide.
 

woodyosborne

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Some other variation of the above. i'd have original maker make another matching shaft. if original maker is not available, i'd try to get someone to make a matching shaft. i don't think i'd get collars pulled off an original shaft, unless it was in bad shape.
that's my opinion. i've an early Joss with two original shafts. i had another shaft made. now i've still got the originals and another matching shaft. vintage collars are susceptible to age shrinkage. wood in my block letter Joss collars has shrunk a bit.
 

poolguy4u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
.



I'd just put in on my wood pile and forget about it.

I don't know if it's a $20 dollar or $500 dollar vintage cue.


Sometimes it's just no worth it to mess with them.

You can straighten the shafts yourself with a lot of patience.


Send to Proficient Billiards and let him figure out what to do with it.

Might cost a couple hundred....



.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
if its worth less than 1500 id sell as is. if more have the original maker make one or a top maker do it. leave the original shafts as is. let thenew buyer decide.
 

Type79

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
It really depends on value and history of the cue.

$100 cue - Whatever you do will not affect it’s value.

$500 -$750 and up - I would save all of the original shafts and have new matching shafts made.
 

Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Knowing that most potential purchasers want "very straight" and full shafts, do you leave it alone, or would you:

You are selling it?

Just sell it and let the buyer decide.

Very often I see a sale where somebody did X, Y, or Z to an old cue and I just pass it up.

If it's a cue like a Mottey or JW, who is going to make those shafts? How much will that cost? And if you have them made by the best (which you should) do you really think you will recover the cost?

If you want to have a "player shaft" made to match and add to the set, go for it. But unless the original shafts are truly no good, I sure wouldn't go cutting them up for parts.

But if you pay $250 plus for that player shaft, do you really think that will boost your sale price that much? IMHO it makes it harder to sell because the price is higher and you need to find somebody who wants or likes the cue with that exact player shaft you selected...LD, non-LD...and more....


.
 

cuenut

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for all of the replies. Think I have my answer. If the situation arises, I will just keep them original and let the buyer decide. Fyi to whomever made the comment, I always divulge what I know about the cue in advance, and always have a no questions asked "policy" on a sale. As long as it is sent back in a reasonable timeframe and in the same condition as how I sent it.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Depends how much run out exists, & how much is acceptable.
As has been stated, they can be straightened with heat, patience and practice.

May or may not be cost effective.

I'd certainly do that to improve a cue bought or given to me, for myself to use.
Don't know what the "ethics" might be if bought knowing curved, and repaired to improve sale price.

smt
 
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cuenut

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Wouldn't be an ethics issue as it would be included in any description of the cue going forward, but that might not be relayed by other future sellers.
 
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