Sledgehammer Break Versus A More Controlled Break? Which is better?

34YearsOfPlayin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I might be a little behind the times. When I began playing pool a really hard break much like Earl Strickland and Francisco Bustamante was what you wanted to do. But now you have the cut break and everything. A slower more controlled break. Which do you think is the better break? I never really knew much about the break. What is the better break controlled and softer or a very powerful break much like Francisco Bustamante? I feel that I can develop either one. But don't currently possess either. I just kinda try to leave white in the middle of the table.

Thank you
 
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hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I might be a little behind the times. When I began playing pool a really hard break much like Earl Strickland and Francisco Bustamante was what you wanted to do. But now you have the cut break and everything. A slower more controlled break. Which do you think is the better break? I never really knew much about the break. What is the better break controlled and softer or a very powerful break much like Francisco Bustamante? I feel that I can develop either one. But don't currently possess either. I just kinda try to leave white in the middle of the table.

Thank you

Depends on the table and the rack. A slow table with a racker that does not know what they are doing means a hard break. Cut break is OK for when the 9 is on the spot or when using a template and using a slow break (Corey style) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKeJ_zbCz28

Good rack with a normal table is pretty much a medium speed break head on like before, with the angle changing depending the game and how the rack is done, also how the gaps are in the rack. Plenty of good how to break videos and books on the topic, starting with Joe Tucker's Racking Sercrets. https://www.pooldawg.com/racking-secrets-with-breaking-secrets-ii-by-joe-tucker

You can even just watch pool matches and the commentators explain the idea of the break in some of them pretty good, how the player should adjust, the speed they think it should be hit at, etc...
 
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Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Unless you or your opponent runs out more than 10% of the time, the break doesn't really mean much. Emphasize control. The cue ball should never hit a rail on the break unless it gets kicked by an object ball. The cut break would be the exception but you should still control the cue ball.

What is your current run-out-from-the-break percentage?

Here is a video that shows you how to win a lot of nine ball racks in four shots:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnYiuO8I6Pg
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unless you or your opponent runs out more than 10% of the time, the break doesn't really mean much. Emphasize control. The cue ball should never hit a rail on the break unless it gets kicked by an object ball. The cut break would be the exception but you should still control the cue ball.

What is your current run-out-from-the-break percentage?

Here is a video that shows you how to win a lot of nine ball racks in four shots:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnYiuO8I6Pg

Yeah, I'm thinking it'll be more like four turns...
 

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34YearsOfPlayin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unless you or your opponent runs out more than 10% of the time, the break doesn't really mean much. Emphasize control. The cue ball should never hit a rail on the break unless it gets kicked by an object ball. The cut break would be the exception but you should still control the cue ball.

What is your current run-out-from-the-break percentage?

Here is a video that shows you how to win a lot of nine ball racks in four shots:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnYiuO8I6Pg

Hard to say. I don't really track my progress. I have not played nine ball in a year or two. which is my best game. Just 8 ball. I like the idea of emphasizing control a lot. Thanks for the link on how to runout in 4 shots.
 
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DrCue'sProtege

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unless you or your opponent runs out more than 10% of the time, the break doesn't really mean much. Emphasize control.

I've always thought this very same thing Bob. There's just so much luck involved. And if there were brilliant techniques involving the break then why do so many breaks by top professionals not produce a shot? Or a nice spread?

If someone can break and run out 20% of the time that is very good. Anything above that is outstanding from what I have learned over the years.

I dont see it all the time on my Accu-Stats videos. With the match on the line late if there were tricks and techniques I would think that would be the time to see it.

r/DCP
 
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Geosnooker

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The missing variable in 95% of pool instruction and videos is asking ‘who am I playing‘?. Know the opposition.

I’m not playing Efren Reyes so I can afford to turn the table over and most of the time can expect to shoot again.

What are my strengths and what are my opponents strengths? Mine are that I’ve played for 51 years, including Snooker most days, so use a lot of table strategy. The opponents is that he might be marginally more talented than I am. Therefore I’m not going to try to out shoot him but rather to out strategize Him.

I use a moderate break, try to leave the white centre table and, most importantly, want to leave a cluster, I know that I’m usualky better at picking at that cluster than an opponent...especially the safety game. What I don’t want is a break that opens everything up...then it’s just more luck as to whether a ball was sunk or not on the break. I want the odds on my side..

An aside, 95% of the pool in my city is 8 ball. When one says pool generically it means 8 ball. I use The same strategy in 9 ball the few times I play it. In 9 ball I try to keep as much clutter as possible...however we play on 9 foot tables and not always easy.
 
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hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The missing variable in 95% of pool instruction and videos is asking ‘who am I playing‘?. Know the opposition.

I’m not playing Efren Reyes so I can afford to turn the table over and most of the time can expect to shoot again.

What are my strengths and what are my opponents strengths? Mine are that I’ve played for 51 years, including Snooker most days, so use a lot of table strategy. The opponents is that he might be marginally more talented than I am. Therefore I’m not going to try to out shoot him but rather to out strategize Him.

I use a moderate break, try to leave the white centre table and, most importantly, want to leave a cluster, I know that I’m usualky better at picking at that cluster than an opponent...especially the safety game. What I don’t want is a break that opens everything up...then it’s just more luck as to whether a ball was sunk or not on the break. I want the odds on my side..

An aside, 95% of the pool in my city is 8 ball. When one says pool generically it means 8 ball. I use The same strategy in 9 ball the few times I play it. In 9 ball I try to keep as much clutter as possible...however we play on 9 foot tables and not always easy.

Safety and soft breaking is against the rules in most rule sets and tournaments, so breaking to leave a messy table won't work most of the time.
 

Geosnooker

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Safety and soft breaking is against the rules in most rule sets and tournaments, so breaking to leave a messy table won't work most of the time.

Yes, however There is a difference between a soft break with no balls hitting the rails, etc. and one at a moderate speed. I use maybe 65% of what could if putting everything into it. That’s not a soft break. It’s all just physics and a cluster can be left with a low hit dead centre with draw on the cueball.
 
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hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, however There is a difference between a soft break with no balls hitting the rails, etc. and one at a moderate speed. I use maybe 65% of what could if putting everything into it. That’s not a soft break. It’s all just physics and a cluster can be left with a low hit dead centre with draw on the cueball.

Yes that is not a soft break, but at that speed clusters are just luck unless the rack is not tight. I would not feel safe doing that since it will also mean a harder run out for the breaker as well. If it was a weaker player, no need to do this, they are likely to mess up anyway and you are just making it harder to run out for you. If against an equal or better player, they are as likely to know what to do as you. One of the reasons I like 8 ball, it tends to have more strategy and tactics than rotation games.
 
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Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Gosh, the better skilled players I know pound the break and it works for them.
Either they get something to drop pretty consistently or the dry breaks are hard.
When the opponent takes the table, run outs aren’t likely but occasionally happen.

The number of times it happens are far and few between so the odds do favor them.
Like I earlier wrote, aside from making the 9 on the break, they regularly pocket OBs.
As far as I’m concerned, if you have a monster break, use it. Breaking is my weakness.
 

Woodshaft

All pockets are too small
I break with a 25oz, nylon-wrap, Rage cue with a custom triangle tip. I can achieve "Tyler Styer-like" breaks and pocket tons of balls, all without over-stroking the cue ball.
I have tried my friends' revo break cues (and other fluff break cues) and my $100 Rage breaker achieves better balls pocketed results, resulting in more (and easier) b and r's.
The math is easy: the farther the object balls roll, the more likely they are to find a pocket.

You can't break and run if you don't pocket a ball on the break...
 
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