Steering to right

medallio

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Testing out the digicue blue and find I tend to steer tip to the right at times. What causes this?
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Testing out the digicue blue and find I tend to steer tip to the right at times. What causes this?
In my experience that is often due to your head being in the wrong position so you do not see the center of the cue ball accurately. It is impossible to say for sure that head alignment is your problem. I suggest you record a video looking straight back along your cue stick. Shoot multiple straight-in stop shots in your normal way and then look at the video.
 

nataddrho

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I would also suggest recording a video.

Modulating the squareness of your stance for optimum alignment may help as well.
 

Lockbox

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm interested to hear how the digicue might help with this issue as I suffer from it too.

I would recommend checking your stroke alignment with the line on the rail of the table prior to shooting any balls. From my own experience, especially when starting, I notice that my stroke ends up going more towards the right due to a "squared up" stance. This is in part because the bicep is flexing, pulling my cue "into" my chest leading the tip to the right. Just my $0.02.
 

medallio

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Trust me. The digicue showing me the tip steer led to a visual correction. I’m barely missing. Will be in review
 

Masseyman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nate,
A few hypothetical questions to help me understand the readings.

What "Fault" would be effected most if, after your stroke through the cue ball, you see your tip to the left or right of your aim point?

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What "Fault" would be effected most if, during your warm up, and shot, your cue was traveling in an arc motion?

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What "Fault" would score, if any, if your cue stroke warm up is straight and aimed along the black line, but your visual alignment is along the yellow line?
You think your cue is aimed along the yellow line but is actually along the black line, and you hit the mark at the yellow line after you stroke the cue.

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One Pocket John

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Your not building your stance to allow for the shooting arm to close naturally on the shot line and your vision center could be off, which would effect your lining up on the shot line.

As posted earlier, a frontal video will tell you right away what the issue is.

John :)
 
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Masseyman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah, I need to get my camera setup with a head on view and stroke a few while looking at what the data says for each stroke.
 

Scott Lee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No, you need to set up your camera to see a side view. That will tell you much more than just a head on, or rear view. All three would be ideal, but the side view, showing the body and shooting arm give the most feedback. Again, trying to analyze your own video is nowhere near as beneficial or practical as having a qualified professional instructor go through it with you.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Yeah, I need to get my camera setup with a head on view and stroke a few while looking at what the data says for each stroke.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Yeah, I need to get my camera setup with a head on view and stroke a few while looking at what the data says for each stroke.
Whether it's a front view or another angle, I think it's most helpful if you can view it live on a screen placed in front of you while you're stroking. That way you can make live adjustments and see how the correct stroke feels in the moment.

pj
chgo
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm interested to hear how the digicue might help with this issue as I suffer from it too.

I would recommend checking your stroke alignment with the line on the rail of the table prior to shooting any balls. From my own experience, especially when starting, I notice that my stroke ends up going more towards the right due to a "squared up" stance. This is in part because the bicep is flexing, pulling my cue "into" my chest leading the tip to the right. Just my $0.02.

do you mean that a square stance creates tension in your upper arm?
 

Lockbox

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
do you mean that a square stance creates tension in your upper arm?

I'm not sure if tension is the right term. I feel as though when i'm too squared up, my arm is flexing in more than one direction. When I am facing the cue (moreso than when squared up) it feels as though the elbow is working more as a hinge in only one plane.

I'm not sure if this is actually what's happening, but it is what it feels like and the results seem to reinforce this. When i'm squared up, straight shots veer to the left (cue ball goes right) and when I start with my chest basically facing my cue it tends to be straight.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
I'm not sure if tension is the right term. I feel as though when i'm too squared up, my arm is flexing in more than one direction. When I am facing the cue (moreso than when squared up) it feels as though the elbow is working more as a hinge in only one plane.

I'm not sure if this is actually what's happening, but it is what it feels like and the results seem to reinforce this. When i'm squared up, straight shots veer to the left (cue ball goes right) and when I start with my chest basically facing my cue it tends to be straight.
It took me awhile to find the elbow position (distance from body) and shoulder position (how parallel with cue) that brought the cue directly under my elbow, shoulder and vision in a way that my stroke naturally stayed on line over a wide range of speeds. For me it was elbow a little farther out and shoulders a little more parallel. It's probably a little different for everybody.

It helps me to take a moment after getting down to be aware of those things (stick, grip hand, elbow, shoulder, vision) and their alignment in the shot plane. I try to continue this stance check even (especially) after the stance becomes habitual.

pj
chgo
 

Lockbox

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It took me awhile to find the elbow position (distance from body) and shoulder position (how parallel with cue) that brought the cue directly under my elbow, shoulder and vision in a way that my stroke naturally stayed on line over a wide range of speeds. For me it was elbow a little farther out and shoulders a little more parallel. It's probably a little different for everybody.

It helps me to take a moment after getting down to be aware of those things (stick, grip hand, elbow, shoulder, vision) and their alignment in the shot plane. I try to continue this stance check even (especially) after the stance becomes habitual.

pj
chgo

Can you expand on this "stance check?" Especially when warming up, what goes through your mind before you execute the stroke, that tells you you're on (or not)?
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Can you expand on this "stance check?" Especially when warming up, what goes through your mind before you execute the stroke, that tells you you're on (or not)?
My stance check is just a mental inventory of the relative positions of my grip hand, elbow, shoulder and vision - do they feel like they're in the same vertical "shot plane"? (if not, tweak elbow and shoulder positions) - is my stick aligned precisely on the line I want it on for the shot? - is my head turned to face the shot squarely? Your checklist might be a little different.

I do this before taking any warmup strokes - if not, I spend warmup strokes doing the same thing less efficiently and accurately.

pj
chgo
 

Lockbox

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My stance check is just a mental inventory of the relative positions of my grip hand, elbow, shoulder and vision - do they feel like they're in the same vertical "shot plane"? (if not, tweak elbow and shoulder positions) - is my stick aligned precisely on the line I want it on for the shot? - is my head turned to face the shot squarely? Your checklist might be a little different.

I do this before taking any warmup strokes - if not, I spend warmup strokes doing the same thing less efficiently and accurately.

pj
chgo

I like the info. I practice most days and sometimes I just go through the motions until about 10 minutes in. I am trying to get better about having a "checklist" or inventory as you state before I shoot.

Right now I have a few things that I absolutely try to focus on.

1. Palm flat on the table
2. Elbow up (I imagine a string tied to my elbow being pulled towards the ceiling).
3. Pinky in (in essence, stroke straight). I have found that when I curl my right hand pinky and keep it in place, it stablizes my wrist and I can stroke straight, rather than have a sway. Sometimes changing my alignment is needed to achieve this.
4. Slow, final, takeback. Slow, steady acceleration through the shot.
5. Stay down on the shot until the ball is potted/missed.

Anyone else have a similar checklist?
 

tableroll

Rolling Thunder
Silver Member
Testing out the digicue blue and find I tend to steer tip to the right at times. What causes this?

My straightness and tip steering scores have been greatly lowered by focusing on correct stance but mostly on cradling my cue lighter. I already thought I was holding it as lightly as possible. I focused on using the fourth finger from the thumb and the "V" formed by the thumb and forefinger as the cradle. Another key ingredient to a better stroke is to always think and focus on your stroke fundamentals during practice so that they eventually become automatic. In order to develop a clean, smooth, repeatable stroke, I focus on 1. eyes on object ball at contact, 2. Stroke movement at elbow joint ONLY, 3. Zero head and body movement. 4. Slow backswing and pause at end of backswing. 5. Steady increase of acceleration during delivery. 5. Stay down until ball stops moving.
 

Scott Lee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
tableroll...It's not how you hold onto the cue. It's more about training your hand not to squeeze the cue tightly, as you strike the CB...even on the break. I can teach it to anyone. :thumbup:

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

My straightness and tip steering scores have been greatly lowered by focusing on correct stance but mostly on cradling my cue lighter. I already thought I was holding it as lightly as possible. I focused on using the fourth finger from the thumb and the "V" formed by the thumb and forefinger as the cradle. Another key ingredient to a better stroke is to always think and focus on your stroke fundamentals during practice so that they eventually become automatic. In order to develop a clean, smooth, repeatable stroke, I focus on 1. eyes on object ball at contact, 2. Stroke movement at elbow joint ONLY, 3. Zero head and body movement. 4. Slow backswing and pause at end of backswing. 5. Steady increase of acceleration during delivery. 5. Stay down until ball stops moving.
 
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