Table / room size

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The simple way to process this.
Normal outside dimensions of 7 footers are 4x8 and 9 footers outside dimensions are normally 5x10.
Add cue stick length X 2 each side.
 

Meucciplayer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The simple way to process this.
Normal outside dimensions of 7 footers are 4x8 and 9 footers outside dimensions are normally 5x10.
Add cue stick length X 2 each side.

Simple, yes. However, I remember a really interesting discussion here where some people "in the know" said that a 7 footer is not a 7 footer and a 9 footer is not a 9 footer in many instances. Playing surfaces are smaller in many cases. Also, the outside dimensions vary (slightly) from one manufacturer to the next.

So, to avoid any problems once the table is set up I would always get the *real* dimensions of the playing surface and add 2x 58" + 2x 8" around the table playing surface (or 1x 58"+1x 8" on each side/corner/whatever). If I thought that I could get by with 6", well, take 6 instead. But try that out some place before you buy. Simple as can be, set up some piece of furniture, a person or whatever and check your stroke on a normal table somewhere in a pool hall at the exact distance you are going to have.

If you would like to play with a shorter cue, try that one out first before you buy the table. And try it out for at least a whole evening. If you still believe that is what you want, go for it. Once you installed an - expensive - table, it is too late and if you regret your choice in the following years, you probably wish you had thought about things in more detail before you bought. At least that is the way I am.
 

TRWpool

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Just to make it clear to those of you who happen to be guessing at actual playing surface sizes.

A 7 ft table's inside dimensions are 78" x 39"

An 8 ft table's inside dimensions are 88" x 44"

A Pro 8 table's inside dimensions are 92"x 46"

And a 9 ft table's inside dimensions are 100" x 50"

Except for the \ cosmetics the width of the rail is no factor as far as room size is concerned.

I used to sell tables and it is my opinion it is best to always go with the largest size table your room came accommodate. That would include occasionally having to using a slightly shorter cue. This would especially be true if you enjoy playing One Pocket or travel to various pool tournaments. One Pocket and 9 ball are an entirely different games on smaller tables.

Tom

HI Patrick, I hadn't realized to posted a graph with table dimensions. Guess I passed right by it, sorry.
 
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GoldCrown

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I used to sell tables and it is my opinion it is best to always go with the largest size table your room came accommodate. That would include occasionally having to using a slightly shorter cue. This would especially be true if you enjoy playing One Pocket or travel to various pool tournaments. One Pocket and 9 ball are an entirely different games on smaller tables.
.

Totally agree. Smaller tables are not the same if a player likes/is use to a 9 ft. I'd rather grab shorter cue if shooting off the rail. Also a custom 55" cue can be made. Anyway the situation might change from 17x14 to 18.2 x 15. If that's the case...case closed...no pun intended. It's a 9r.
 
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Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
HI Patrick, I hadn't realized to posted a graph with table dimensions. Guess I passed right by it, sorry.
Hi Tom - no prob. My chart wasn't complete - for instance it didn't include the size 7-footer you mentioned. Here's the complete chart - I'd appreciate anybody pointing out any table sizes I've missed.

pj
chgo
 

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Back to the question. Small table big sticks. Big table small 52” on occasion.
My 9 Goldcrown has a bad corner where I kiss the wall. Also one long wall is borderline.
Next question... let’s say the room is 18x14. 8 ft ProAm looks good!!
So now that I see you decided to go 9' ProAm, seems you decided to go big table, occasional use of small stick (at the two ends). Since I'm struggling to find an 8' or 8'+ GC I may just have to do what you say above, "8 ft ProAm looks good!!" (my room is 17' 10" by 13' 11") Congrats on the new table. I may also go PRC.
 

JT4Annapolis

JT in FL now
I would prefer smaller table and no obstructions. Note Diamond 7FT is slightly larger 40x80 playing surface from what has been posted.
 

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Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Keep in mind, if the room is ''tight'' there will be no room in the room corners for a high top round table preferably 2, you'll have to mount drink rails on the walls.
 

bignick31985

Life Long Learner
Silver Member
20'x20' after walls furred out it's 19'7" +/- 1" square and houses a 9' GC4. No obstructions in any direction. Just for the record. The head and foot, if frozen to the rail, gives you about 6-7" of space behind your cue. I'll say I've never thought about it and also have never hit a wall with my cue.

If I ever had a tight room, I'd probably go barbox and never look back. I'd rather be able to shoot without interference than have a larger table.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Has been asked repeatedly. In a room 17 x 14.... would you get a 9ft table and use 52"cues on end rails or an 8ft table and always use 58"cues. My gut is a 9ft with 52's on the end rails. Thanks..

Just knock out a damn wall.
That's what my wife made me do for her 9' BBC.
Said something about making the room big enough to display her '72 Triumph Daytona, too.
But AFA details, i'm old enough to have advanced stage selective hearing loss.

smt
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The below specs are from a Brunswick Catalog from the early 1920’s.
It states that the space is calculated so as to allow sufficient space for
the free action of the cue, not less than 4 ft. 6 in should be allowed
between the outer edge of the cushion rail and any wall, mantel, angle
or piece of furniture. However, pool cues made back at that time were
57” long instead of 58”. So I suppose another inch has to be be added.
 

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The below specs are from a Brunswick Catalog from the early 1920’s.
It states that the space is calculated so as to allow sufficient space for
the free action of the cue, not less than 4 ft. 6 in should be allowed
between the outer edge of the cushion rail and any wall, mantel, angle
or piece of furniture. However, pool cues made back at that time were
57” long instead of 58”. So I suppose another inch has to be be added.
These numbers have been published ad nauseum here and there is no consistency to them IMHO. For example, on the 9' example using a 58" cue, there is a 1" drawback on the sides and a 3" drawback at the ends. Why is it not the same? Potential distance maybe? Not to mention that although 3" is doable, it's tight. Even more confusing are the 8' numbers. With 13' width you would have to jack up the cue because it's short (156" - 44"=112"/2=56"). Length is a wash (204"-88"=116"/2=58"). At the end of the day one has to be comfortable with the playing field as it is. For recreational players who want to get better but don't compete, the occasional use of a short cue isn't usually an issue. Guys who compete generally have different standards. To each his own. As someone here once said, "pool must be played".....
 
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