Table / room size

GoldCrown

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Has been asked repeatedly. In a room 17 x 14.... would you get a 9ft table and use 52"cues on end rails or an 8ft table and always use 58"cues. My gut is a 9ft with 52's on the end rails. Thanks..
 

Meucciplayer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well, tastes are different, I suppose. I don't believe in changing playing cues all the time. I believe that hurts your game more than playing on a smaller table. YMMV
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well, tastes are different, I suppose. I don't believe in changing playing cues all the time. I believe that hurts your game more than playing on a smaller table. YMMV

My thoughts as well, I don't think I would want to switch cues that often. I would opt for the smaller table.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Take the outside dimensions of the table, add 58'' and that's what's needed. It allows you to ''swing your cue'' for warm up strokes. Top rails on tables vary depending on the mfg. 17' x 14' wide is perfect for a pro cut Diamond Bar table. Best table to come along since the GCI.
 

GoldCrown

AzB Gold Member
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I appreciate the replies. I'd like to hear from people that have the same situation and what they did....and would they do the same again. . I could live with an 8ft. Would most like use it by myself...practice stroke, caroms, banks, etc. I just peeked at a Brunswick Pro8 Anniversary. Oh baby....but it needs 17.6
 
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Denis The Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most cues are 58 in, say 8 inches for stroke so 6.5 ft on each end and side .

7 ft table needs 20 ft x 16.5 for unobstructed play. More for Shane, Shaw who use longer cues.

7 + 6.5 + 6.5 = 20 ft
3.5 + 6.5 + 6.5 + 16.5 ft
 

9BallKY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As much as I hate bar boxes I would probably go with the smalller table. I think having plenty of room will make the game more enjoyable. Nothing more frustrating than trying to play when your backstroke hits something on a regular basis. It’s harder to adjust if you go somewhere that’s has a 9’ but you find very few tournaments on a 9’ anymore.

If your mainly a one pocket player just tear down a wall regardless of what on the other side and get the 9’. If your wife gets mad and leaves you, then you will have more time to enjoy the table. Pool must be played.
 

GoldCrown

AzB Gold Member
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If your mainly a one pocket player just tear down a wall regardless of what on the other side and get the 9’. If your wife gets mad and leaves you, then you will have more time to enjoy the table. Pool must be played.

Sir ... I love the way you think
 

Meucciplayer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well, I have a 6.5 ft table because I don't like the constraints. A friend of mine has a 9 ft table with an unplayable corner. I prefer my small table where I can play from any side everywhere. I thought about setting up a 9 ft table but this would have meant that two walls about 10" wide would have been in the way on both sides. Those can't be removed because it's the basement of a large building and those are supporting structures. Playing on a table where 20% of the shots are not possible is terrible, IMHO. Such a table would only be ok for practice drills but playing games on it is no fun at all.
 

orion21

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most cues are 58 in, say 8 inches for stroke so 6.5 ft on each end and side .

7 ft table needs 20 ft x 16.5 for unobstructed play. More for Shane, Shaw who use longer cues.

7 + 6.5 + 6.5 = 20 ft
3.5 + 6.5 + 6.5 + 16.5 ft

You confused me with this one. Why would you need more than 58" between the table and the wall? You actually need less- the tip of the cue is never going to fall off the edge of the rail or he cue would leave your bridge hand!
 

Denis The Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You confused me with this one. Why would you need more than 58" between the table and the wall? You actually need less- the tip of the cue is never going to fall off the edge of the rail or he cue would leave your bridge hand!

You will need to stroke the cue I would think. Allen Hopkins is the only person I can think off that never really back stroked his cue. Most player need to come back with cue 4 to 8 inches before delivering the stroke. Rare for back stroke to be 8 inches but some are.
 

Denis The Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You confused me with this one. Why would you need more than 58" between the table and the wall? You actually need less- the tip of the cue is never going to fall off the edge of the rail or he cue would leave your bridge hand!

Also 7 ft is playing surface without rails I believe.
 

9BallKY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You will need to stroke the cue I would think. Allen Hopkins is the only person I can think off that never really back stroked his cue. Most player need to come back with cue 4 to 8 inches before delivering the stroke. Rare for back stroke to be 8 inches but some are.

If the cue ball is frozen to the rail, from there to the outside of the table is close to 8 inches plenty of room for a back swing. Besides when the cue ball is frozen to the rail 90% of the time a player uses a shorter back swim anyway.
 
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Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
My handy room size calculator says you can squeeze either type of "7-foot" table into your room (nothing larger) - but the larger "7-footer" only leaves you 3 1/2" of stroking room lengthwise.

pj
chgo

room size.jpg
- "playing area" dimensions are cushion nose to cushion nose
- both "7-footer" playing areas are smaller than 3 1/2' x 7'
- cue length includes 1/2" for the bumper
 
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GoldCrown

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Back to the question. Small table big sticks. Big table small 52” on occasion.
My 9 Goldcrown has a bad corner where I kiss the wall. Also one long wall is borderline.
Next question... let’s say the room is 18x14. 8 ft ProAm looks good!!
 

jimmyco

NRA4Life
Gold Member
Silver Member
Most cues are 58 in, say 8 inches for stroke so 6.5 ft on each end and side .

7 ft table needs 20 ft x 16.5 for unobstructed play. More for Shane, Shaw who use longer cues.

7 + 6.5 + 6.5 = 20 ft
3.5 + 6.5 + 6.5 + 16.5 ft

Check your math.
 
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