The flaws in playing the ghost...

John Daminato

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The fact that playing a safety will result in a immediate loss of game.
I think a modified version of the ghost would be: Play a safe, If you pocket the ball when you were safe, or you hit it, you lose anyway, it would indicate the safe was too weak to beat the ghost. If you cant hit the ball or foul trying to hit it. Then you retake ball in hand from that position and attempt to run out. So for that moment you are the ghost.

In my experience playing the ghost, what really determines if I can beat the bastard (at a certain skill level) is if I can break the balls really well.

Or maybe Im just over complicating a good measurement tool for figuring out how good you are at running balls?:eek: I tend to over complicate.
 

Wink

14.1 Wannabe
Silver Member
Please forgive my ignorance. I thought playing the "ghost" was playing yourself (as in both players). Can you help me understand what you mean here?

For example, if I am playing 8-ball practice, when I miss as the stripes player, I shot solids.

If I am practicing 9-ball, I just continue with the next lowest ball unless a safe is more appropriate.

What am I missing here?
 

Big_H515

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Playing the ghost = If at anytime during your runout you miss a ball, you lose that rack. You do not play as your opponent.

so say youre playing a race to 5 against the ghost

rack 1 you break and run (1-0)
rack 2 you break and miss the 6 (1-1)
rack 3 you break and run (2-1)
etc.
 

Wink

14.1 Wannabe
Silver Member
Well then, that is a little to advanced for me. I am THRILLED when I break and run.

I suppose that I could do that as a motivator to get to the point where I was doing better than 0-5... LOL!

Thanks for the explanation, I clearly had the wrong idea of what it was.
 

pooltchr

Prof. Billiard Instructor
Silver Member
While beating the ghost may be beyond your normal skill level at the moment, it doesn't hurt to try and see how far you get. If you average getting through the 5 ball, then make it your goal to get through the 6.
Goal setting is an important way to measure your progress. Those little goals are simply steps to reaching your ultimate goal. You can also set your goal of running the rack with only 2 misses, or only 1 miss.

Don't rule out using a good tool because it's out of reach. Modify it to make it work for you.

Steve
 

dr9ball

"Lock Doctor"
Silver Member
The fact that playing a safety will result in a immediate loss of game.
I think a modified version of the ghost would be: Play a safe, If you pocket the ball when you were safe, or you hit it, you lose anyway, it would indicate the safe was too weak to beat the ghost. If you cant hit the ball or foul trying to hit it. Then you retake ball in hand from that position and attempt to run out. So for that moment you are the ghost.

In my experience playing the ghost, what really determines if I can beat the bastard (at a certain skill level) is if I can break the balls really well.

Or maybe Im just over complicating a good measurement tool for figuring out how good you are at running balls?:eek: I tend to over complicate.

Something you might like to try if you're a glutton for punishment is to rack up 9 or 10 ball and instead of trying to run out you play the ghost the following way. You must play safe each shot and you can only make a ball once you have played a "locked up safe" (meaning that there is not an easy kick nor jump shot available to your opponent) then you get ball in hand make the ball and play safe on the next ball. See how many you can do in a row. It can be painful but it will focus your mind on saftey play and make you think about what you need to do to lock up the cue ball or object ball.

If you give it a try, let me know how you do.
 

Cameron Smith

is kind of hungry...
Silver Member
If you want to practice all facets of the game, why not play against yourself, and focus on making as few unforced errors as possible?

ie. Try to run out when you have the opportunity, and play safe when you don't have a good shot. Mark down all unforced errors over the course of 10 games or so, and try to finish with fewer and fewer each time.

Unforced error I guess would mean missing any ball, safety or any easy kick.

It's not a regimented routine, but it can pay dividends.
 
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