The PAUSE in pool stroke

jimmyc

Registered
I liked that clip of Cisero Murphy - I'd seen it before. What's just as remarkable as his pause (to me) is his slooow start forward on the final stroke.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
While Kristina Tkach's pause after taking cue back and returning to cue ball may be on the extreme side, how does someone practice "something" to embed the pause in their delivery system. Despite practicing pausing, when playing I rush the takeaway and return.

Seems so simple, but in my case .... dang :cool:

Advice appreciated!!! john_oleson@comcast.net
I'm probably not one to take advice from, but I don't focus on a pause at the back, I instead focus on a smooth, unrushed transition into the forward swing. I tried practicing the pause a lot, but all it did was make me dog the shots. Perhaps it's worth exploring not that my stance and alignment is better than it used to be.
 

Tin Man

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'm probably not one to take advice from, but I don't focus on a pause at the back, I instead focus on a smooth, unrushed transition into the forward swing. I tried practicing the pause a lot, but all it did was make me dog the shots. Perhaps it's worth exploring not that my stance and alignment is better than it used to be.
That is exactly what I emphasized in my post. 👍
 

Fatboy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I tried to build that pause, hang into my stroke. Can’t be bad, didn’t help or hurt me-I was playing everyday at the time. If it works for someone great, if not that’s ok too.

What ever works is my idea of the right way in pool. I have nothing to sell, lessons are usually worth the $. I’m not knocking a good lesson or changing your stroke.

best
Fatboy
 

Cuebuddy

Mini cues
Silver Member
I have been working on the pause for months. It seems to be starting to be automatic after several hours of play now. I can't play every day, and the lack of pause now shows up early in my game. Once I settle in and start to focus on it I start to shoot very well.
For me it is easier in practice sessions than in competition. I will not give up on working on it as it has made a huge difference on making shots that should be made at my level.
 

Ratta

Hearing the balls.....
Silver Member
Everyone has to work out something, what fits with his eye-pattern-- to finally being able to give himself "the go". The stop at the cueball ( PONR = Point of no return) is really important- because here YOU decide if you commit....or you have one of these stupid 2nd thoughts in your head :) --
It s all about the transition vrom backwards to forward motion-to not rush it. that s the key- that s it!
how long this would have to be? depends on the individual. Noone can tell you what s right for you- but could help you workin it out.
 

Gatz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Took me a good year to develop a paus at the back stroke. I couldn’t even draw the ball for the longest time lol. I always liked John Morra’s stroke/mechanics and my game at the time needed some over halling. Once I got the hang of it, everything in my game got better. Straighter stroke, smoother, timing and it also helped me with staying down on the shot alot better which helped with nervs. Definitely not for everyone, but i’d give it a good try before you decide its not for you.

I actually recorded myself 11 years ago trying out the paus (probably a week or so in trying it) i was so bad and couldn’t even get the paus in, was rushing the stroke alot.


and here is a video of me about 2 years ago. The difference is night and day lol


then heres a video thats not even 1 year old. Can see even more improvement in my stroke. Slower warm up strokes, smoother. Always working on my stroke, always room for improvement. Just sucks it takes so much time and practice lol

 

VVP

Registered
The question is what's the reason for a pause? Is it giving your brain the last chance to get it right in terms of sight alignment and preparing to fire the right signals to your muscles? I believe it all boils down to muscle memory. Work hard and practice and your brain will do it's own thing to get you there.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
The question is what's the reason for a pause?
For me:
- disconnecting the shot stroke from the back stroke (no reversing direction in the middle of "the stroke")
- "starting from zero" to control acceleration and shot speed
- a designated moment for final intense focus and aim

pj
chgo
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
While Kristina Tkach's pause after taking cue back and returning to cue ball may be on the extreme side, how does someone practice "something" to embed the pause in their delivery system. Despite practicing pausing, when playing I rush the takeaway and return.

Seems so simple, but in my case .... dang :cool:

Advice appreciated!!! john_oleson@comcast.net
the Pause from my perspective is when ''top of the backswing discontinues'' then transitions forward.
Base ball pitchers have this form, the wind up ''pause'' then the pitch.
If you watch SVB he has a pause, slight second gear pause then transitions forward.
 

Scratch85

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Since we have strayed from the OP’s question of how to practice a pause to what’s the reason for a pause, I will give my two cents.

The pause is a timing mechanism that disconnects the backward motion of the cue from the forward motion of the cue and nothing more. Without a proper pause, your backward motion fails to influence your forward motion properly. All three processes work together to make a properly timed stroke.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MattPoland

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In my opinion you’re already on the right side of the debate by asking the question. There’s no doubt that a pool stroke has a transition from triceps to biceps. And obviously hitting the CB where you intend is critical to having the outcome you visualized. So whether it’s and extreme pause or fluid pause, it’s clear that transition cannot be rushed or jerky. As long as this is in your mind while practicing, doing drills or competing then you’re on the right track.
 

Konrad5288

Active member
If you practice with a very loose grip you have to pause before the forward stroke. While talking about loose grip. If you are a gripper loosen up on your straight shots. It helps!
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
as in any kind of swing use what is natural for you. you cant manufacture it. other wise when under pressure you will tend towards your natural swing and not hit how you wanted to.

none of you are going to be buddy halls or any of the top players so dont think their swing is right for you because it isnt.
your swing is you.
other wise plan on dogging it when the big shot comes up for you.
 

Gunn_Slinger

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
While Kristina Tkach's pause after taking cue back and returning to cue ball may be on the extreme side, how does someone practice "something" to embed the pause in their delivery system. Despite practicing pausing, when playing I rush the takeaway and return.

Seems so simple, but in my case .... dang :cool:

Advice appreciated!!! john_oleson@comcast.net

While Kristina Tkach's pause after taking cue back and returning to cue ball may be on the extreme side, how does someone practice "something" to embed the pause in their delivery system. Despite practicing pausing, when playing I rush the takeaway and return.

Seems so simple, but in my case .... dang :cool:

Advice appreciated!!! john_oleson@comcast.net
A lot of amateur golfers ( and some pros ) Fight this all the time. Very similar to the pool stroke. If they don't have a slight transition pause at the top of the backswing , they will 'swing from the top' . This causes loss of power and the swing gets out of the grove and miss hits the ball. Very ugly in golf.
In pool , you must start the forward swing at the same speed you took it back and then accelerate THRU the OB.
Its hard to see live , but recorded in slow motion makes it really easy to see the flaw.
Good luck all ( me too ) lol
 
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