Threaded Pin in Shaft?

mchnhed

I Came, I Shot, I Choked
Silver Member
Why do cheap cues put the threaded pin in the shaft?
Are there any good cues that do it that way?
 

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Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Layani cues uses a tapered pilot and threads are in the shaft end. Very nice design.
 

Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The feel thing is so subjective, but by moving the pin to the shaft you might add a few grams of the weight to the shaft and thus moving the balance point forward ever so slightly.
 

Mcues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lol Billiard cues have a long history of having the pin on the shaft, wood to wood threads.

Mario
 

Snooker Theory

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lol Billiard cues have a long history of having the pin on the shaft, wood to wood threads.

Mario

I don't know much about the history, read a little on here and the web.

Why did many cuemakers get away from having the pin in the shaft other than the additonal pins needed for more shafts?

Believe a read on here somewhere that carrom cues are a little stiffer due to the nature of the joint(pin in shaft/wood to wood), I could be remembering that incorrectly...
 
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Mcues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't know much about the history, read a little on here and the web.

Why did many cuemakers get away from having the pin in the shaft other than the additonal pins needed for more shafts?

Believe a read on here somewhere that carrom cues are a little stiffer due to the nature of the joint(pin in shaft/wood to wood), I could be remembering that incorrectly...

Carom cues have a different taper with more mass to move heavier balls and they tend to be shorter in length. Billiard shafts are usually 27" to 28".

In modern times the pin in the shaft was never widely used, just a few makers adopted this type of joint.

Mario
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't know much about the history, read a little on here and the web.

Why did many cuemakers get away from having the pin in the shaft other than the additonal pins needed for more shafts?

Believe a read on here somewhere that carrom cues are a little stiffer due to the nature of the joint(pin in shaft/wood to wood), I could be remembering that incorrectly...
Imagine making shafts after delivering cues.
Would you rather just drill a hole and thread it ( big screw ) or install an insert or install a screw on every shaft order ?
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I have a Spain and a Robinson and they play fine. My understanding is Hermon Rambow started putting the pin in the butt and being the top cuemaker around in his earlier years I think the American cuemakers that came after just copied him.
Those earlier cues had piloted brass joints and with two shafts becoming popular it made more sense to put the more complicated and expensive half of the joint on the butt.
 
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thoffen

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you're designing something with one of part A and 2 of part B, of course you'd pick the simpler, cheaper, more repeatable option to go on part B.
 
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conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Snooker cues have been doing the thread on the shaft . Typically they were a 1/3-2/3 break or they did the 1/4-3/4 break with the longer shaft. In both types, they were still making the pin in the shaft. For the reason, I do not know. Typically they were brass as well, and have a brass ferrule.
 
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