Tip diameter

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here is a pic. Be aware that this tip is harder than what anyone would probably want to use. It’s also ready for replacement, the thickness is between a nickel and a dime, so probably into the glue effected area. This is after a hard session of 9 ball lasting 6 hours. Chalked every shot. Set the chalk last play session, but it’s ready again. Probably 10-12 hours of hard playing. No miscues tonight in 6 hours. Tried TOI every shot and was shooting great, at my top level.
View attachment 609317
So yeah I use the edges. Notice the middle is fully dressed as it is after setting the chalk. I just thought you might find it interesting.
Do you have trouble getting backspin, especially on power draw shots? Maybe it's the angle of the image, but it looks pretty flat. Also, it's way too smooth for my taste. But that's just me.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
N
Do you have trouble getting backspin, especially on power draw shots? Maybe it's the angle of the image, but it looks pretty flat. Also, it's way too smooth for my taste. But that's just me.
I don’t have much trouble at all but this tip is overdue for replacement, thus the flatness. It’s actually about a quarter diameter so perfectly useable but it is a bit flat for my taste. I gave up on the medium tip on my other cue so I got this one out until I can do a replacement.

It’s honestly stupidly thin, only slightly thicker than a dime. I got the idea to shape it with sandpaper rather than setting the chalk for a bit so it didn’t last long.
9E92A051-FE1D-455D-9AFE-C9149C38FDD2.jpeg

I bought this used, the scratches on the ferrule were from a previous owner.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
N

I don’t have much trouble at all but this tip is overdue for replacement, thus the flatness. It’s actually about a quarter diameter so perfectly useable but it is a bit flat for my taste. I gave up on the medium tip on my other cue so I got this one out until I can do a replacement.

It’s honestly stupidly thin, only slightly thicker than a dime. I got the idea to shape it with sandpaper rather than setting the chalk for a bit so it didn’t last long.
View attachment 609322
I bought this used, the scratches on the ferrule were from a previous owner.
Thanks for the additional view. Yes, I would have changed that tip for sure. But if you were Mike Sigel, that tip would probably be too thick for you. He used to shave his tips down to where they were nearly gone. That's how he liked them. I could never understand it, and neither could the other players, but to each his own.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Thanks for the additional view. Yes, I would have changed that tip for sure. But if you were Mike Sigel, that tip would probably be too thick for you. He used to shave his tips down to where they were nearly gone. That's how he liked them. I could never understand it, and neither could the other players, but to each his own.
It’s personal preference but to me a hard tip and a thin (but not this thin) tip feels like you can “bite” the cueball better. Hard to explain but it’s more feedback without the cushioning of a softer tip. Kind of like tapping a screwdriver on a piece of metal vs a piece of wood or leather. You have just as much grip with a chalked hard tip but no interference from the squish/bounce of the tip. The thinner the leather the less material that can compress. The cue is almost hard wired to your senses.
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It’s personal preference but to me a hard tip and a thin (but not this thin) tip feels like you can “bite” the cueball better. Hard to explain but it’s more feedback without the cushioning of a softer tip. Kind of like tapping a screwdriver on a piece of metal vs a piece of wood or leather. You have just as much grip with a chalked hard tip but no interference from the squish/bounce of the tip. The thinner the leather the less material that can compress. The cue is almost hard wired to your senses.
I am the opposite.

I always preferred a taller tip.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
I always preferred a taller tip.
Me too. When first installed my tips are always as tall as they are wide, because my tip's less than 10mm wide (about 3/8"). I like 'em that way, but if the glue job isn't perfect they'll pop off after a few maximum draw shots.

pj
chgo
 
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boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
This is silly sounding, but hitting with the edges of your tip gives a "ping" as opposed to a center tip giving a "bonk." I guess this is another part of this fascinating game, different strokes for different folks. :)
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
This is silly sounding, but hitting with the edges of your tip gives a "ping" as opposed to a center tip giving a "bonk." I guess this is another part of this fascinating game, different strokes for different folks. :)
You can even tell where a cue is from - for instance, Chinese made cues sound like ping on the edges and pong in the middle.

pj
chgo
 

Floyd_M

"Have Cue, Will Travel"
Silver Member
I think that either the tips are no good or the shooter is doing something unusual. Normally a player will end up using all different rotations of the cue stick and chalk in all different rotations and that will keep the tip symmetric.
Our little group is well versed in spinning our cues. Shooter not knowing, I'll stand behind'm as they perform their rituals and follow through (if any). Ya, sometimes we still POP shots. Anyways, I see the cue rotating usually a little, sometimes a lot. I've noticed that if they're spinning a lot, they tend to miss the shot or setup due to indecision's... I'm guilty as well. Ya, we're amateurs.
SO, back to the tip. The tips are installed usually be me but the guys are learning. Each prefers a different brand, layer(s), etc., and no 2 are same makers. Yet the bulge has happened on 3 tips so far in 4 months, none on the layered Talisman or Kamui. I think it's a simple matter of a brainless machine stamping out a full sheet verses a trained human eye that'll spot areas in the leather sheet to not use.
 

BC21

Poolology
Gold Member
Silver Member
Tried out an 11.8mm carbon fiber shaft again during CSI's vegas tournament last week. The additional amount of back spin and side spin I got, when compared to my 12.5mm Mezz shaft was very noticeable.

I realize this is because with the thinner shaft I was aiming the center of the tip in the same manner as with my thicker shaft, and that actually produced a cb contact slightly farther away from ccb.

Based on PJ's diagrams of tip shape, I think I could reshape my tip, make it more round, and with my 12.5mm tip I could then get the same results I was getting with that 11.8mm tip. It's either that or work on striking the cb 1mm lower. One method involves a simple reshaping of the tip, while the other involves modifying a habit of not striking the cb as low as possible. Hmmmm.... ?? Keeping in mind that super draw shots and super spin shots are rarely needed, I believe I'm going to just reshape my tip.

Thoughts?
 

Ratta

Hearing the balls.....
Silver Member
Tried out an 11.8mm carbon fiber shaft again during CSI's vegas tournament last week. The additional amount of back spin and side spin I got, when compared to my 12.5mm Mezz shaft was very noticeable.

I realize this is because with the thinner shaft I was aiming the center of the tip in the same manner as with my thicker shaft, and that actually produced a cb contact slightly farther away from ccb.

Based on PJ's diagrams of tip shape, I think I could reshape my tip, make it more round, and with my 12.5mm tip I could then get the same results I was getting with that 11.8mm tip. It's either that or work on striking the cb 1mm lower. One method involves a simple reshaping of the tip, while the other involves modifying a habit of not striking the cb as low as possible. Hmmmm.... ?? Keeping in mind that super draw shots and super spin shots are rarely needed, I believe I'm going to just reshape my tip.

Thoughts
You re absolutely right Brian- As long as you have exactly the same shape you ll have very similar results. Imo you ll feel usually differences as soon as you re going extremely far outside (near the the zone where you would be close to scratch). the 12.5 version is much more "forgiving" as the 11.8 mm version is.


As you said also: these super duper extreme draw shots are the main reason, *not so strong players" buy this stuff. the energy transfer and the accuracy is really impressive on some carbon fibre shafts- but you need an excellent technique to have a superb control by using "extreme" thin shaft diameters.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Based on PJ's diagrams of tip shape, I think I could reshape my tip, make it more round, and with my 12.5mm tip I could then get the same results I was getting with that 11.8mm tip. It's either that or work on striking the cb 1mm lower. One method involves a simple reshaping of the tip, while the other involves modifying a habit of not striking the cb as low as possible. Hmmmm.... ?? Keeping in mind that super draw shots and super spin shots are rarely needed, I believe I'm going to just reshape my tip.

Thoughts?
To maximize that effect, if you have enough tip height, try a full half circle curvature.

pj
chgo
 
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