Tip install help

Tom1234

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
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I really need some help here. The make of tip doesn't matter as I have had this happen with all brands. It is a soft tip. Installed on mid-size Cuesmith lathe. New Muecci replacement ferrule. Only used Lenox titanium blades (new) to cut tip to diameter of ferrule and to shape to dime size radius. BARELY touched blade to tip shape as leather ribboned off nicely. Lathe turned at slow speed. Little chance of heat build up. Now the question-why did this tip "click"? It sounds like glue rubbing against glue! Is this possible? Thanks.
 

captainjko

Kirk
Silver Member
When you say "click", are you saying that is the sound it makes when you are shooting with it? If so, it is possible there is an air pocket between tip and ferrule. Or is ferrule slightly loose and sliding on tenon?
 

Tom1234

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The tip clicks when hitting the cue ball. The ferrule was faced off square (Chris Hightower lathes are very accurate). No air pocket as I always make sure glue completely covers (a thin layer from a single drop of glue). Ferrule was glued and screwed on. If this helps, ProTech makes a "rubber" no chalk tip. Very soft. The cue makes no noise when I put one of those on the same cue. In fact, it doesn't matter if the ferrule was factory installed or not; the only variable was the cue tip. Again, I am bumfuzzled.
 

Kimmo H.

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What glue do you use for the tip? And do you prep the tip prior to install with a thin layer of glue? Glues also have a limited lifespan, especially when opened and kept in room temperatures. Always use fresh glue if you have issues with installs at any time.

I had similiar issues in the past on my first tip installs untill I fine tuned my install process a bit.
First of all, the tip has to be totally flat, I use p400 sandpaper to roughen the surface and sand it flat. Test fit on the ferrule to see that it doesnt pivot on the surface but sits on it flat and square. Then make sure the surface is free of any sanding dust. I like to use compressed air these days but blowing on the tip works aswell. Then I use a drop of Loctite 401 to prep the tip, a drop of glue on the glue side and use a rubber glove to distribute the glue evenly and wipe off all excess glue. Let harden for a minute or so, then wipe gently on the sandpaper to make sure the surface is flat and free of imperfections. When the tip is prepped and ready for install wipe the ferrules face clean with a paper towel. Apply a single drop of 401 on the tip and press it firmly on the ferrule untill it fixes on a little. I like to apply a little pressure on the tip while it dries. On a lathe you can use a drill bit or something similiar to keep things in place while the glue sets. I made a special tool for this from a bolt and an old tip I had cut off a shaft. Let it dry for 5 minutes for the glue to harden thoroughly.
Once the tip is installed I like to use a very sharp carbide cutting bit to cut it down to correct diameter. Cut the shape with a rest and a razor blade as usual, burnish sides gently and wipe the face of the tip with coarsed sandpaper for a scuff and you should have a pretty well installed tip :smile:

I haven't had a single bad install using the above process so far and dont expect to have one any time soon. Let us know what went wrong once you get it right :rolleyes:
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
if it does it with different tips but not the rubber one, check the weight bolt make sure its tight. a very soft 'rubber' tip will absorb a lot of vibration, but a normal leather tip will not and that can make the weight bolt make noise when loose. Even a loose bumper can make a click noise when you shoot..Try your shaft on another cue, your buddy's etc. If it still does it, then redo the ferrule. If not, then probably in the butt.
Dave
 

akaminski

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It has to do with either of 2 things. 1 is how do you shape the tip, does the click sound go away if you sand the tip down with a hand file? If so change the way you shape it. Try hand first until you get confortable and use a razor blade to shape it with a steady rest

2 may be a guess is you said you are cutting it at a slow speed. I actually cut layered tips at a faster speed but I do apply a little water to help cut the leather. If you are going too slow it almost sounds like your cutter can possibly delaminate the layers of the tip


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
If you tried all that has been advised and it still clicks. Here is what I would like to know. What kind of sandpaper was used to sand the back side of the tip or finish shaping the front side. Regular sandpaper often puts grit into the tip and it cracks making a clicking sound when you hit the cue ball. That is why I only use Red Cloth backed sanding belt type material to sand either side of the tip with. I learned this one the hard way with top pro players wanting to know why their tips were clicking at a tournament I was working in the 80's. Luckily I figured it out pretty fast. At first I though I had a bad box of tips.
 

ideologist

I don't never exaggerate
Gold Member
Silver Member
Are you blindly relying on accuracy? Did you indicate it? What's the run-out when you face it? Show a profile shot of where the tip and ferrule meet up
 

qbilder

slower than snails
Silver Member
This is one of the major reasons I won't use layered tips. Most people don't notice the sound but it drives me bonkers. The old Mooris & 23 layered Hercules tips always sounded solid & firm, but every other layered tip I have used is hit or miss. Some sound great & some remind me of a sneaker with worn out sole. I don't know what was ever broken with a simple, firm, solid leather tip. Still my go to choice.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Are you blindly relying on accuracy? Did you indicate it? What's the run-out when you face it? Show a profile shot of where the tip and ferrule meet up

I've seen this before. The face looks flat but has a slight dome.
The gib on those cross slide sometimes move.

Grab a razor blade and butt it on the face. Check if it's dead square. Put a flashlight under.

And when you sand the bottom of the tip, make sure the sand paper is on a dead flat surface ( vice or a lap ).
 

captainjko

Kirk
Silver Member
I've seen this before. The face looks flat but has a slight dome.
The gib on those cross slide sometimes move.

Grab a razor blade and butt it on the face. Check if it's dead square. Put a flashlight under.

And when you sand the bottom of the tip, make sure the sand paper is on a dead flat surface ( vice or a lap ).

^^^^ What Joey said and spin the tip in your fingers when you slide it on the sand paper. If you keep it in the same direction when you slide it, it can sand crooked.... I have my old Willard tipping machine sitting on the work bench beside my lathe.. It has a carbide roughed area for scuffing tips... I still use that tool for every tip I install......
 

Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've seen this before. The face looks flat but has a slight dome.
The gib on those cross slide sometimes move.

Grab a razor blade and butt it on the face. Check if it's dead square. Put a flashlight under.

And when you sand the bottom of the tip, make sure the sand paper is on a dead flat surface ( vice or a lap ).

I just have to add that if you install a few tips, get yourself a small granite slab, just for the purpose of sanding tips, makes life alot easier.
 
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