Tip Pads ...

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Howdy All;

What is the purpose of them??? Good thing ($ well spent)?? Bad thing ($ not so well spent)??
personal thing (Bling to make ya feel betta)?? What's the deal with them and how long have
they been around?

Just bein' curious.

hank
 

J$Cincy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Truthfully I like the look plus it gives your Ferrules and infinite life on tip changes lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Miscues can take chunks outta your ferrule. Spacing, creates a safe zone to nearly eliminate that.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
cue ball surface striking the flat ferrule surface with no spacing between the glue and the tip bottom.
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
cue ball surface striking the flat ferrule surface with no spacing between the glue and the tip bottom.
Island Drive, Howdy;

Only way I can 'see' that happening is if tip's edge is missing or the tip just isn't there.
Otherwise the tip edge should be parallel with the ferrule's edge. Or, another way of
saying it would be both diameters should be equal and adjacent to each other, yea?

hank
 

Tommy-D

World's best B player...
Silver Member
It was way more common when ivory ferrules were the standard,and the pad started out as a way to protect those,with the original pad materials being an epoxy/cardboard mixture commonly called "fish paper" back in the day,and came in black or the reddish-brown stuff you see on Tascarella shafts,or on the old Champion or Triumph tips.

I've never seen a non ivory ferrule have a chunk come out unless someone was breaking with it.

The more durable phenolic ferrule materials like LBM,Ivorine-4,that are capped,it almost doesn't happen,but can. Tommy D.
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Howdy All;

What is the purpose of them??? Good thing ($ well spent)?? Bad thing ($ not so well spent)??
personal thing (Bling to make ya feel betta)?? What's the deal with them and how long have
they been around?

Just bein' curious.

hank
Hi Hank
Pads between the tip and ferrule are more common now than ever. The introduction of carbon fiber shafts, a good portion of them have some sought of pad. It comes in many different materials. The Vulcanized silencer pad from Predator. Per Predator, the silencer pad HAS to be there and changed if it gets to low.
Mezz, McDermott, Meucci all insist on thier own pads being in place. They're all different. They all react different to in terms of playability. The clear pad mounted to Kamui tips and others that have followed with the clear for thier own reasons.

The easiest way for you to judge them is to try as many different pads as you can,
Form your own opinion. Don't take mine or anyone's word for it.
Start with the Kamui clear and non clear tips. That might be the easiest place to start. Keep in mind that besides the clear pad on Kamui's, there is also another pad on top of the clear before the tip.
Happy Learning!
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Also, a tip w/o a pad, has to be replaced sooner than one with a pad.
w/o a pad your tip base is Much closer to the ferrule.
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Howdy All;

Thank you ALL for the replies. I look at Carbon as the remains of something that burned up.
All my shafts are wood. ferrules are not a natural material and I'm classified as in my younger 70's.
Been playing pool on an off since the Summer of '61. I was just askin' about the pads as I've read
a bit about them. Can't say as I care much for/about the layered tips. Tried a couple, prefer my
Le Pros and those Milkduds they guy on here sells. Still can't recollect ever hear of someone knockin'
a chunk outta their ferrule, that would be something to log into the memory bank. chuckle.

Thanks again for the thoughts.

hank
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Not a cue maker, but I do tips, cleaning and shaft reconditioning for myself and friends.

I've played for 30 years using the most terrible fundamentals (until a few years ago) and miscued all the time with the most extreme english, jumped, masse with the cue etc and never had a cracked ferrule. I've had the same cue the whole time and break with it too (with enough break speed miscues to lose count). The ferrule was even turned down a bit once upon a time. Maybe McDermott made it well enough to withstand my stupidity but I don't think cracked ferrules are a given without a pad. They happen, but with a decent ferrule material and a wooden shaft I think you're OK without a pad.

I think the old trend was to protect ivory and the new trend is to protect the small ferrules on CF. So I'd say the most practical use is ease of tip changes and looks. Any additional glued joint could potentially be a point for failure. One failure point instead of two is good in my book. My tips don't pop, but why make an additional place where they could theoretically do so? I'm not sold on them.
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think the old trend was to protect ivory and the new trend is to protect the small ferrules on CF. So I'd say the most practical use is ease of tip changes and looks. Any additional glued joint could potentially be a point for failure. One failure point instead of two is good in my book. My tips don't pop, but why make an additional place where they could theoretically do so? I'm not sold on them.
boogie, Howdy;

I remember my days as an aircraft painter and structural repair mechanic. We didn't 'glue' anything to a painted surface
as it wasn't being 'attached to the aircraft', rather it was just being stuck to the paint so it was kinda important that 'things'
be adhered to the structure and not anything else. Your highlighted (red), point above fits into that like a tailor made glove.
Nice way to say it.

hank
 
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