what percentage of shots do you hit with open/closed bridge?

philly

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Don't know the percentage.
All I know is that when I get down on the shot I
unconsciously use an open or closed bridge.
I never think about it as in do I use open or closed.
It's like my body just knows what to do to make
a comfortable effective stroke when I get down on the shot.
If I rationalize it though, I think the closed bridge is much more substantial and solid.
 

crazy8legs

Registered
That might be because they use a "piston" stroke (moving their elbow up and down to keep the cue level throughout the stroke).

pj
chgo


That's one way. But it can be done without that too. Your grip has a lot of effect on it as well.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

The_JV

Local_Pro
That might be because they use a "piston" stroke (moving their elbow up and down to keep the cue level throughout the stroke).

pj
chgo

Interesting.... I consider myself to be a retired snooker player that now plays pool. My mechanics were taught to me to mimic professional snooker players. My elbow is rock solid and my cue completely level throughout the stroke.

During the follow through, my elbow will dip. This of course has nothing to do with how the shot is struck.
 

goettlicher

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Great question!

I'm primarily a follow player. That probably puts my percentage at about 80/20.

On "Follow" I use open hand most of the time.
On "Draw" I use closed most of the time.

The truth is, I'm comfortable with all my bridges.

randyg
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It totally depends on how many rail shots I have to play.
When the cue ball is on or near the rail, I use an open bridge.
Other than that, if I cannot use a closed bridge due to another OB.
I play with a closed bridge all the other times, probably 75-80%.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
95% Closed. Open bridge used only when dictated by the shot -- think "jacked-up". Early on, I worked on my bridge a lot and often observed and analyzed other people's, too. Probably because I read about such in a book, I was all about the "points of contact" created and whether they had any undesired effect on the cue's travel. In the course of learning to bridge as I do, I quite often felt damned awkward and experienced some degree of discomfort. As I have gotten older, I started to worry about arthritis. (lol -- its everywhere else, so why not my bridge hand.)
 

evergruven

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Depends on the stroke too. If you hold the stick long and/or tend to stroke down at the ball an open bridge is all that's necessary. If you grip closer to the balance point and/or favor a "moarer" level cue, a loop bridge might be moar prudent.

FWIW I favor a loop bridge with a levelish stroke and gripping towards the back of the cue. I never squeeze the bridge. There is always air at the top of the loop which might not be the intended distinction when switching from an open bridge.

hey straight
this is why I'm currently shopping for a more forward-facing balance point
easier to use open bridge..
shot ok
but I don't think a cue should dictate what bridge one uses

Don't know the percentage.
All I know is that when I get down on the shot I
unconsciously use an open or closed bridge.
I never think about it as in do I use open or closed.
It's like my body just knows what to do to make
a comfortable effective stroke when I get down on the shot.
If I rationalize it though, I think the closed bridge is much more substantial and solid.

hey philly
I think some degree of unconscious in this case is good
sounds like your mind/body knows what it's doing
don't think about it, just do it..I'd like to get there more

Great question!

I'm primarily a follow player. That probably puts my percentage at about 80/20.

On "Follow" I use open hand most of the time.
On "Draw" I use closed most of the time.

The truth is, I'm comfortable with all my bridges.

randyg

hey randy
interesting you call yourself a "follow" player
but use an open bridge more
I follow using an open bridge, too
but for some reason correlate "follow" with "closed"
good to comfortable with all bridges tho

It totally depends on how many rail shots I have to play.
When the cue ball is on or near the rail, I use an open bridge.
Other than that, if I cannot use a closed bridge due to another OB.
I play with a closed bridge all the other times, probably 75-80%.

hey bava
I thought about this reading the thread
then came upon your post
if I'm close to the rail, but can see the cb
I'll use a closed bridge off the rail
but if the rock is really resting on the rubber
definitely open bridge off the rail

good stuff all
thanks for the replies!
 

brigeton

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Back when I was young I'd play in bars with no AC & house cues so I always used an open bridge because the cue slides so much easier. After all the bars & pool halls had AC and I was playing with my own cue I switched to a closed bridge cause I thought it would be more stable. I now use a closed bridge except when I'm jacked up.
 

gregnice37

Bar Banger, Cue Collector
Silver Member
I'd say I'm 95% closed and 5% open. Never really too comfortable with open. Probably because my fingers are chubby as I'm a really big guy.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm short, with corresponding arms
can't maintain my bridge well, and reach very far back
why a longer cue?

More people seem to be going long. 60+" Extreme cases like Shaw and Strickland come to mind. If you were tall enough the extra length might help with enough front weight to to stabilize the cue.

I'm on the short side myself and can see having another inch on my 58" cues. The thing about holding a cue on the back half of the wrap area is you stick the rest of the cue out past your bridge. You use a normal stance. It's easier to line up and see the shot if that's what you look for and contrary to what they say about inaccuracy, if your stroke is accurate, how is more shaft in front of the bridge gonna make any difference?
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
One things for sure on delicate close up shots, I don't want my knuckle covering up Exactly where my cue tip is striking whitey.

Any time I move the cue ball allot to get to my next shot, Especially on a shot when your shoulder drops with excessive swing speed, it should be a closed bridge.
 

evergruven

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
More people seem to be going long. 60+" Extreme cases like Shaw and Strickland come to mind. If you were tall enough the extra length might help with enough front weight to to stabilize the cue.

I'm on the short side myself and can see having another inch on my 58" cues. The thing about holding a cue on the back half of the wrap area is you stick the rest of the cue out past your bridge. You use a normal stance. It's easier to line up and see the shot if that's what you look for and contrary to what they say about inaccuracy, if your stroke is accurate, how is more shaft in front of the bridge gonna make any difference?

thanks for the reply
but I don't get this at all..
more length in the back would just bring the balance point further back with it, right?
and my short arms would be along for the ride, leaving much shaft in front, si
but I just don't see the advantage to that..
I don't want the cue dimensions to dictate where I put my hands
(as much as possible, anyway)
I want to put my hands on the cue where I want to
if my hands are way back, and my bridge is two feet long
isn't that going to affect the way/how accurate I shoot?
especially if it's unnatural in the first place
diff'rent strokes?
thanks again
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
generally-speaking

I'd say 80/20 for myself
would be more open, if I could stay off the rail better :p

I can't give a percentage, but it mainly comes down to considerations like what kind of shot, if you're too close to a rail, shooting over balls etc. I'd like to use a closed bridge on most shots, but it's not always possible. I need to work on bridging over balls since it seems like my opponents love to leave me those shots lately.
 

RRfireblade

Grammer Are For Stupids
Silver Member
Grew up playing a closed bridge, probably cause it seemed like that's how all the 'real' pool players shot. ;)

IDK percentage now though, maybe 50/50? I'm not sure I have a preference, some shots just tell me to use one or the other.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
thanks for the reply
but I don't get this at all..
more length in the back would just bring the balance point further back with it, right?
and my short arms would be along for the ride, leaving much shaft in front, si
but I just don't see the advantage to that..
I don't want the cue dimensions to dictate where I put my hands
(as much as possible, anyway)
I want to put my hands on the cue where I want to
if my hands are way back, and my bridge is two feet long
isn't that going to affect the way/how accurate I shoot?
especially if it's unnatural in the first place
diff'rent strokes?
thanks again

You can get an extended shaft, or an extension which would put the additional weight in front. Holding the cue long might be temporarily out of your tactile comfort zone but I believe accuracy is a function of stroke which, is a function of letting the cue be its perfectly linear self.
Hitting a ball at most shots involves forces in the range of poking your finger into somebone's belly. You'll find poking at the ball from 15" quite effortless. Don't wind up all the way like Melling and you should be fine. Even guys with no windup - Hopkins FI, use the long bridge. It does work.
 
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