What tips and chalk is everyone using?

koogz

Member
Everyone is trying to buy a game, you should try lessons and practice.

I replied once, but thought I could do much better, so after some consideration.

"Everyone is trying to buy a game."
This can't be more true, if we were playing golf it would stand out far more (imho).
I've been away from the game for 20 years, but even back then, there were novel ideas in 'technology' with regards to billiards.

- Bridge attachements
- Graphite everything
- Gizmos to help your aim; game; etc.

I've even tried a graphite snooker cue, and instantly hated it.
It could be me. I'm not a hammer breaking the balls up in 9 ball, but do recall you don't need to.
(i.e., Hit the white so it lands center table, make one ball, run the rest.). No hammer needed. Old school.

There is a beautiful finesse to the game when it is played well. It's poetic; dancelike; hypnotic; spiritual; melodic, and meditative. None of these can be modified by money. To your next point. Learn to play the game well. This applies to all games and sports.

"you should try lessons and practice."
So, true. When I started, I consumed all materials I could, and from any source. Books; Videos, and instruction. By instruction, I also mean discovering the hustlers that could quietly put my game to shame so well it was palpable. Watching others play well and digesting what they were doing, helps, just as the lessons I paid for from Don Feeney. I had the great privilege to meet and learn a few games from him. (carom, pool, and snooker.). This experience can't be compounded enough in a statement, but what I labored to expand on, you said in one concise statement. An important undeniable truth. Be as student of the game.

Now then, back to tips and chalk.
I've got old equipment, which I love. The newly acquired Ray Schuler, one of the cues I regret selling back in a time where I could visit Ray at his shop and chat with him around a billiard about cues. A mild mannered kind and highly intelligent conversationalist If ever I met one. The cue is warped but I found someone that is willing to take on the repair for a fair price. My next cue, will be a Mike Bender, of which I should also never have parted with so many years ago. I'm on a wait list for one of his great cues.

I've got 4 shafts that need re-tipping, and I only recall a few tips I used back in the day, my shafts actually have them on still. I was reading in this forum about Dennis Searing, and am fascinated by hand made products, and his tips certainly do qualify. After reading about Dennis and his attention to detail and perfection, I'm sensing a common theme, so relevant and important to keep alive in our time moving forward. Hand made, means so very much, and we should promote that. (Granted, his tips are layered, a kind of newer tech., but it works.).

Moving forward to Chalk, and close this post out.
I have had a relationship with Master Chalk dating 30 years. I have a vacuum sealed container of 48 cubes, somewhere. It boggles my mind because that container is 20 years old. I'm going to pause for effect here. So, when I see any product, like ROKU from Kamui, I'm kind of enticed to give it a try. After watching some reviews that can sway one either direction., one thing stood out to me. How long the chalk lasts. Not on your tip, because habitually one should garnish your tip every shot if not lightly just for good measure, and practice. The sheer life span of the chalk. I love the idea of one piece of chalk that can last 6 months maybe a year.

I think we over apply chalk to a nauseating degree, and much of it is left on the cue ball, as well the table. I don't mind splurging $30 personally for chalk, and $10 each per tip that will probably last me a good season of play. Now those $10 tips (Precision Layered from Dennis Searing) Give the man a plug here. Those are for my standard shafts and carom. The snooker shaft on the other hand is going to be an oddball trial of a tip made by a company not known for billiards. As a matter of fact, it's so other side of the spectrum, I'm confused as to why 80% plus of the world's pro snooker players use those tips. They are pig skin, and assumably last a very-very long time. They don't split. I have to try this non-new tech product. The company is Cuesoul, and I was able to buy them in a bag of 5 for $25 on Amazon. I got the super soft (SS) edition, and can't wait to give them a try.

So, my appeal here, forgive the long windedness, is to promote the old technology and hand made forms of the game, as well embrace where one can, some of the newer technology, at least when it benefits our enjoyment and longevity of the game. The less one has to replace a tip, or piece of chalk, the better. Efficiency and fluidity, in my opinion is the goal. One doesn't simply stop dancing in order to change their shoes because the song is different... That's my way of saying, I don't need or want a break stick. Two cues for me. One for carom and pool, and one specifically made for snooker.

If you managed to get this far without falling asleep. You must be an introvert like me, and we should be friends.
Cheers!

-M
 
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Grimper

Active member
The Roku 6 is a very clean chalk. Not quite as clean as the Taom v10, but close. I have actually been going back and forth between them for a few weeks. I like them both a lot, but I seem to prefer the Roku’s “grittiness” over the Taom.
 

spktur

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It's funny, but when I posted that I was thinking how much this is like golf with people buying all kinds of equipment thinking they will be able to hit it like the pro that endorses it. Getting good at anything requires work (practice) and is a lot easier if you learn to do it the right way (lessons) in the beginning.
 

spktur

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yet another person worried about how other people spend their own money.
No, as far as I'm concerned you can throw your money out the window, but buying a piece of chalk isn't going to make you a better player
 

chefjeff

If not now...
Silver Member
I learned real pool for the first time without tips or chalk.

So, any of it is good for me. 'cept that crap that sticks to the cue ball. Yuk.


Jeff Livingston
 

koogz

Member
i noticed mark allen is using a maple shaft with titanium ferrule
Yes. I’d go for that. I’m no fan of ash and brass. The sound is excruciating to me. Not sure how titanium compares however. On my other cough snooker cue I had a 9.5 tip with phenolic ferrule and conical rock maple shaft. Insane feel.
 

MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
No, as far as I'm concerned you can throw your money out the window, but buying a piece of chalk isn't going to make you a better player
Who said it would make anyone a better player? Some of us just value cleanliness more than others. Many of us use it on home tables and it makes a big difference in keeping things cleaner than most other chalks.
 

Greg M

Active member
i noticed mark allen is using a maple shaft with titanium ferrule
Kyren Wilson has also switched to Century's titanium ferrules on his cue, but his is ash.

Yes. I’d go for that. I’m no fan of ash and brass. The sound is excruciating to me. Not sure how titanium compares however. On my other cough snooker cue I had a 9.5 tip with phenolic ferrule and conical rock maple shaft. Insane feel.
Ash and brass is certainly what I'm used to. Out of the five cues I own, the only one that's maple and has a different ferrule material other than brass is my break cue for English pool.
 

spktur

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Who said it would make anyone a better player? Some of us just value cleanliness more than others. Many of us use it on home tables and it makes a big difference in keeping things cleaner than most other chalks.
Assuming you actually can read maybe you should go back and read this thread again and see that it's about playability and not how pretty or just clean the chalk is
Who said it would make anyone a better player? Some of us just value cleanliness more than others. Many of us use it on home tables and it makes a big difference in keeping things cleaner than most other chalks.
Assuming you actually can read you might go back and read this thread from the beginning when it was about playability and not about how pretty or clean a piece of chalk is
 

MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Assuming you actually can read maybe you should go back and read this thread again and see that it's about playability and not how pretty or just clean the chalk is

Assuming you actually can read you might go back and read this thread from the beginning when it was about playability and not about how pretty or clean a piece of chalk is
If you can cure your double vision (double posting) you'll see most of the talk is about cleanliness of the cue ball, table, floors, etc...
One less cup of coffee before posting might lessen your anger. And if you cannot afford premium chalk, please allow those of us who can afford it to buy it without criticism.
 

koogz

Member
Who said it would make anyone a better player? Some of us just value cleanliness more than others. Many of us use it on home tables and it makes a big difference in keeping things cleaner than most other chalks.
I like this.
Kyren Wilson has also switched to Century's titanium ferrules on his cue, but his is ash.


Ash and brass is certainly what I'm used to. Out of the five cues I own, the only one that's maple and has a different ferrule material other than brass is my break cue for English pool.

To be fair, the ash snooker cue was a powerglide, and I just couldn't get used to the hit. I'm not sure if I had played a bit with other makes such as a John Parris. I priced out a one piece at about £1,138.00. If given the chance, I'd give one a try, but he does offer a full maple. I say maple, and the more I consider the feel and hit, I do believe it's the brass on brass joint that was in my powerglide. It clicked too loud for me. I like a soft stiff hitting cue; hence the one piece would probably be the way to go.

The price for me at this point isn't worth the risk / reward. I know for the time frame and money, I'd rather commission an American Custom Cue maker to create my perfect snooker cue.
 

Greg M

Active member
To be fair, the ash snooker cue was a powerglide, and I just couldn't get used to the hit. I'm not sure if I had played a bit with other makes such as a John Parris. I priced out a one piece at about £1,138.00. If given the chance, I'd give one a try, but he does offer a full maple. I say maple, and the more I consider the feel and hit, I do believe it's the brass on brass joint that was in my powerglide. It clicked too loud for me. I like a soft stiff hitting cue; hence the one piece would probably be the way to go.

The price for me at this point isn't worth the risk / reward. I know for the time frame and money, I'd rather commission an American Custom Cue maker to create my perfect snooker cue.
If you want a perfect snooker cue, I'd say your best bet is Mike Wooldridge. Offers full maple shafts and a BlackSpin ferrule. My dream cue would have to be one of his Black Legend cues.

Was your Powerglide half-jointed or a 3/4?
 

koogz

Member
If you want a perfect snooker cue, I'd say your best bet is Mike Wooldridge. Offers full maple shafts and a BlackSpin ferrule. My dream cue would have to be one of his Black Legend cues.

Was your Powerglide half-jointed or a 3/4?
I’ll look him up.
It was 3/4 jointed.

Edit:
I looked him up. (Mike Wooldridge) and am fascinated at his ferrules, and the joint for his cues.
 
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L I F D 1

L S S T 10
Silver Member
which chalk is favored?
any good quality Green, i personally feel it mashes onto the tip better.
pre-flag master is good 👽
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Been workin' my way thru tips. I'm now using layered pig skin. Tried em once in the late 70's, they were too much $$.

This tip I've been hittin' with is a....G2 medium, I did not like the leather as much as the Mori medium leather quality.
My next order, one Mori medium and one Mori hard.
About $20 each but worth it.
Personally, I think the cue and the tip can do more to the shot, than chalk .
 
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