What type of Beeswax for slate joint sealing?

Robotron

Member
What type of beeswax should be used for slate joints?

I'm looking to buy some on amazon.ca (Canada) but most seem to say cosmetic grade???

Is it all the same stuff, what should I look for?

Any help appreciated!
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
Wax from Beehive, Michel's sells it under $10.00 for a big block. Beeswax is great for 5 or 6 other uses, natural lube nails, nuts, screws, etc.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
What type of beeswax should be used for slate joints?

I'm looking to buy some on amazon.ca (Canada) but most seem to say cosmetic grade???

Is it all the same stuff, what should I look for?

Any help appreciated!
Beeswax is for the birds. Use bondo. Mix it right on the slate surface, wipe it in with a metal scraper removing the excess as you go and then use a razor blade scraper to scrape it flat prior to when it's very hard. Scrape it when it's like semi hard plastic. If you do it right just a quick once over with a sanding block to knock off any tiny bit left behind. When you go to take it apart score the joint with a razor knife prior to separating the slates.
 

Cuebuddy

Mini cues
Silver Member
Beeswax is for the birds. Use bondo. Mix it right on the slate surface, wipe it in with a metal scraper removing the excess as you go and then use a razor blade scraper to scrape it flat prior to when it's very hard. Scrape it when it's like semi hard plastic. If you do it right just a quick once over with a sanding block to knock off any tiny bit left behind. When you go to take it apart score the joint with a razor knife prior to separating the slates.
I kinda like the tiny bits that may be left behind. Kinda like racking with an old triangle rather than a Magic rack. It leaves a little un-predictability in the game:p
 

Robotron

Member
I like the divided opinion :)

Does anyone know if there are different types of beeswax, and which are or are not best for slate joints?
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Tried to ask my bees but they kind of buzzed a little bit, guard bee came out all groggy and said “stfu & go away, we’re trying to hibernate here”

I would say some is harder than others but not enough to go searching special. IOW it is not graded or separated. Old oxidized dark brown comb seems harder. It is not something anyone without hives is going to accumulate or separate. OTOH there is some whitish stuff from a number of years back that is also crystalline & hard. Truthfully I never experimented.

smt
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
I like the divided opinion :)

Does anyone know if there are different types of beeswax, and which are or are not best for slate joints?
Ok let me just quit beating around the bush then .

There is no kind of bee's wax good for slate joints. 150 years ago it was the bee's knees.

Technology has since come up with better solutions.
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
beeswax is great if you have consistent humidity and temp. If a table has it, you should use it because all of it has to be removed to use bondo. Bondo does not stick to slate that has wax on it, It may appear to, but, i am confident it will come loose. Bondo is what I use on new table installs. my wife buys me unfiltered raw beeswax.

TFT
 

pocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Personal experience reinforces the idea that beeswax is not a great solution for you slate seams. Caused several issues on my table (table in a garage in so cal). so unless this will be stored in a climate controlled environment year round - stay away. Why not use bond, or I’ve seen that rock hard putty used. But my advice, avoid wax.

Even if it is ‘resin enhanced’ like was used on my old table.
 

Robotron

Member
Yes, I like the sound of the Bondo method. But the table was definitely waxed previously, and concerned I won't get a Good bond due to this :(
 

justnum

TesticularCancer Survivor
Silver Member
candle wax is cheap and easy to find. why do they cover it in the first place anyway?
 

nick serdula

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Brunswick used to train techs to mix plaster. Latex spackle and bees wax are easy and clean. Bondo sounds easy. Wax sounds easiest.
Nick :)
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
candle wax is cheap and easy to find. why do they cover it in the first place anyway?
if I ever finish the room to set up wife’s 1920’s 9’ BBC my tech will decide whether bondo or beeswax.
Could be wrong but I believe he uses either one depending on conditions.

However to suggest “candle wax” is just wrong. Unless you are stealing catholic altar candles :)

Most candles are paraffin wax which is brittle, crumbly, & melts at a lower temperature than pure beeswax.
Even altar candles are a mix, for lower cost & to burn better, which is probably not ideal for pool tables.

Beyond that I don’t know a thing about specialty engineered waxes of which there are a huge range including machinable waxes for proofing prototypes on cnc machines that behave more like plastics.
 

justnum

TesticularCancer Survivor
Silver Member
if I ever finish the room to set up wife’s 1920’s 9’ BBC my tech will decide whether bondo or beeswax.
Could be wrong but I believe he uses either one depending on conditions.

However to suggest “candle wax” is just wrong. Unless you are stealing catholic altar candles :)

Most candles are paraffin wax which is brittle, crumbly, & melts at a lower temperature than pure beeswax.
Even altar candles are a mix, for lower cost & to burn better, which is probably not ideal for pool tables.

Beyond that I don’t know a thing about specialty engineered waxes of which there are a huge range including machinable waxes for proofing prototypes on cnc machines that behave more like plastics.
when security features are placed to avoid people unscrewing something I understand, like a public streetlight.

but on a pool table why?
 
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